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Full text of "Apple Service Technical Procedures Macintosh Family - Volume One (1991-03)(Apple)[PN 072-0228]"

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Apple Service 
Technical Procedures 
Macintosh Family 
\folume One 



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Macintosh 



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Can be installed only in 
SIMM positions 3 and 4 
because of space 
constraints. 

Can be installed only in 
SIMM Bank A because 
of space constraints. 

Apple ships a compat- 
ible service exchange 
module when receiving 
one of the finished-goods 
SIMMs. You will not 
receive a finished-goods 
SIMM as a service 
exchange module. 



©Apple Computer, Inc. 
1988,1989,1990. 
Macintosh, Apple, and 
the Apple logo are 
registered trademarks 
of Apple Computer, Inc. 

rev. Oct. 90 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Family 

Document Control 

April 1991 



TECHNICAL PROCEDURES FILING INSTRUCTIONS 

REMOVE PAGES 
MACINTOSH FAMILY - VOLUME TWO 

VOLUME Table of Contents 2 page 



INSERT PAGES 



2 pages 



Macintosh II/IIx/IIfx 


i-iv, 3.1 


i-iv, 3.1 


Macintosh Ilci 


i-iii, 4.7, 
IPL.1-IPL.5 


i-iii, 4.7 
IPL.1-IPL.7 


Mac Multiple Product 
Diagnostics 


1.5, 1.9-1.12 


1.5, 1.9-1.12 



MACINTOSH FAMILY - VOLUME THREE 

VOLUME Table of Contents 2 pages 



AppleColor High-Res RGB 
Monitor 

Macintosh 12-Inch RGB 
Display 



3.9 



i, 1.1-1.6 
2.1, 2.19, 
IPL.1-IPL.3 



2 pages 



3.9 



i, 1.1-1.6 
2.1, 2.19, 
IPL.1-IPL.3 



MACINTOSH FAMILY - VOLUME FOUR 

Hard Disk 20 2.1-2.4 



2.1 



Macintosh Family 



Apr 1991 



Document Control / 1 






REMOVE PAGES INSERT PAGES 
MACINTOSH FAMILY - VOLUME FIVE 

VOLUME Table of Contents 1 page 1 page 

Macintosh Portable i-iv, 3.1-3.10 i-iv, 3.1-3.10 



Please store this Document Control Sheet behind the Table of 
Contents at the front of the manual 



Note: All Technical Procedures changes are highlighted by a double 
line I I in the outside margins. 



2 / Document Control Apr 1991 Macintosh Family 



) 



I 






Apple Service 
Technical Procedures 
Macintosh Family 

Volume One 

PN: 072-0228 



Copyright 1982-1889 by Apple Computer Inc. March, 1991 



) 



ft Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Family 

Volume One 

Table of Contents 



-Title page (contains build date) - 

Macintosh/ -Table of Contents 05/90 

Macintosh Plus -Basics 02/87 

(except pages 1.1-1.8) 03/90 

-Take-Apart 02/87 

(except page 2.14) 02/89 

(except page 2.18) 07/89 
(except pages 2.1-2.7, 2.9, 2.12, 

2.15-2.17) 03/90 

(except pages 2.1, 2.19, 2.20) 05/90 

(except page 2.13) 03/91 

-Diagnostics 02/87 

(except page 3.17) 03/89 

(except page 3.11) 09/89 

-Troubleshooting 02/87 

(except pages 4.2, 4.5) 09/88 

(except pages 4.1, 4.4-4.8) 09/89 

(except page 4.9) 03/91 

-Adjustments 02/87 

(except pages 5.1, 5.3-5.7, 5.9) 07/89 

(except page 5.8) 11/89 

—Additional Procedures 02/87 

(except pages 6.22, 6.25) 10/88 

(except page 6.6) 11/88 

(except page 6.19) 09/88 

(except page 6.20) 07/87 

(except page 6.21) 07/89 

(except pages 6.23, 6.24) 01/90 

(except pages 6.1-6.5, 6.7-6.16) 05/90 

-Illustrated Parts List 04/87 

(except pages 7.1, 7.18, 7.19) 10/88 

(except pages 7.3, 7.5, 7.9) 11/89 

(except page 7.13) 08/87 



.Continued on next page 



> 



Macintosh Family-Volume One Mar 1 991 Main TOC / 1 



Macintosh / 


(except page 7.17) 


02/89 


Macintosh Plus 


(except page 7.6) 


04/89 


(Continued) 


(except pages 7.7, 7.14, 7.15) 


10/90 


Macintosh SE and 


-Table of Contents 


11/90 


Macintosh SE/30 


—Basics 


02/89 




(except pages 1.2-1.15) 


08/89 




(except pages 1.1, 1.16) 


03/90 




—Take-Apart 


08/89 




(except page 2.37) 


11/89 




(except pages 2.2, 2.5-2.7) 


03/90 




(except pages 2.1, 2.30-2.35) 


10/90 




—Diagnostics 


08/89 




(except pages 4.18, 4.19) 


09/89 




(except page 4.8) 


05/90 




—Troubleshooting 


01/89 




(except pages 5.1, 5.3, 5.12) 


03/89 




(except pages 5.7, 5.13) 


08/89 




—Additional Procedures 


01/89 




(except pages 6.1-6.7) 


11/90 




(except pages 6.8, 6.9) 


01/90 




(except pages 6.29-6.31) 


08/89 




(except pages 6.10, 6.15, 6.16, 6.19, 






6.21) 


07/89 




(except pages 6.26-6.28) 


04/89 




—Illustrated Parts List 


02/89 




(except pages IPL.l, IPL.3) 


11/90 




(except pages IPL.6, IPL.7, IPL.9, 


08/89 




IPL.17) 






(except page IPL.10) 


11/89 




(except page IPL.13) 


10/89 




(except page IPL.16) 


06/89 




(except pages IPL.21, IPL.23, 






IPL.25, IPL.30, IPL.3D 


02/89 




(except pages IPL.ll, IPL.19) 


10/90 


Macintosh 


-Table of Contents 


12/90 


Classic 


—Basics 


10/90 




—Take-Apart 


10/90 




(except page 2.14) 


11/90 




(except page 3.3) 


01/91 




—Adjustments 


12/90 




—Diagnostics 


12/90 




—Troubleshooting 


10/90 




—Illustrated Parts List 


10/90 



I 






2 / Main TOC 



Mar 1991 



Macintosh Family-Volume One 






ft Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh and Macintosh Plus 

Technical Procedures 






□ TABLE OF CONTENTS 




Section 1 - 


1.2 


Macintosh and Macintosh Plus — Differences 


Basics 


1.3 


Memory 




1.3 


Disk Capacity 




1.3 


Keyboard 




1.3 


Interfaces 




1.3 


Internal Connections 




1.4 


Theory of Operation Overview 




1.4 


Introduction 




1.4 


Modules and Functions 




1.8 


Keyboard and Keyswitch Identification 


Section 2 - 


2.3 


Electrostatic Discharge Prevention 


Take-Apart 


2.3 


Cover 




2.6 


Discharging the Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.6 


Discharge Procedure 




2.7 


Anode Cap 




2.9 


Power/Sweep Board 




2.12 


Logic Board 




2.15 


Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.17 


Internal Disk Drive 




2.19 


Chassis 




2.20 


Keyboard 


Section 3 - 


3.2 


Introduction 


Diagnostics 


3.2 


MacTest 




3.2 


How to Use It 




3.3 


Things to Remember 




3.5 


Backup Procedure 




3.10 


Running MacTest 




3.10 


Materials Required 




3.11 


Pull-Down Menus and Icons 




3.12 


512K 




3.12 


Select Test 




3.14 


Options 




3.15 


Apple 

...Continued on next page 


Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 




rev. May 90 Contents / i 



Section 3 - 


3.16 


Diagnostics 


3.16 


(continued) 


3.19 


Section 4 - 


4.2 


Troubleshooting 


4.2 




4.2 




4.2 




- 4.2 




4.2 




4.3 




4.4 




4.4 




4.5 




4.7 




4.8 


Section 5 - 


5.2 


Adjustments 


5.2 




5.2 




5.3 




5.5 




5.5 




5.5 




5.5 




5.8 




5.8 




5.8 




5.9 


Section 6 - 


6.2 


Additional 


6.2 


Procedures 


6.3 




6.4 




6.7 




6.8 




6.8 




6.9 




6.9 




6.13 




6.14 




6.14 




6.16 




6.16 




6.16 



Miscellaneous Icons 
Running the Diagnostic 
Error Codes 



Introduction 

General Information 

Before You Start 

How to Use the Symptom Chart 

Exchanging the Logic Board 

Exchanging the Power/Sweep Board 
Things to Remember 
Symptom Chart 

Video Problems 

Drive Problems 

Peripheral Problems 

Miscellaneous Problems 



Power/Sweep Voltage Adjustment 

Introduction 

Materials Required 

Voltage Adjustment 
Yoke Adjustments 

Introduction 

Materials Required 

Adjustment Procedures 
Video Adjustments 

Introduction 

Materials Required 

Adjustment Procedures 



Macintosh Plus Kits 

Things to Remember 

Disk Drive and Logic Board Kits 

Macintosh Plus Disk Drive Kit 

Macintosh Plus Logic Board Kit 
Special Problems 

Alternate Chassis Screw Sizes 

800K Drive Exchange Compatibility 

800K Disk Ejection Problems 

Logic Board ROM Upgrade and 400K Drives 
Macintosh Plus RAM Upgrades 

Logic Board Configurations 
ROM Version Compatibility 

ROM Upgrades for Enhanced Macintosh Systems 

Replacing 512K Logic Boards 



■ 



ij / Contents 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Section 7 - 7.3 Macintosh External Housing (Figure 1) 

Illustrated 7.5 Macintosh Plus Chassis and Power Supply 

Parts List (Figure 2) 

7.7 Macintosh Exploded View (Figure 3) 

7.9 Macintosh Keyboard Assembly (Figure 4) 

7.11 Macintosh Numeric Keypad Assembly (Figure 5) 

7.13 Macintosh Plus Rear Housing (Figure 6) 

7.15 Macintosh Plus — Exploded View (Figure 7) 

7.17 Macintosh Plus Keyboard Assembly (Figure 8) 

7.19 Service Packaging, 800K/1.4 MB Drives 
(Figure 9) 






©Apple Computer, Inc., 1985-1990. No portion of this document may be reproduced in any form 
without the written permission of Apple Computer, Inc. 

MacTest, FDHD, and SuperDrive are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 

Macintosh, Apple, and the Apple logo are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 

Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. May 90 Contents / iii 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh and Macintosh Plus 

Section 1 - Basics 



□ CONTENTS 








1.2 


Macintosh and Macintosh Plus — Differences 




1.3 


Memory 




1.3 


Disk Capacity 




1.3 


Keyboard 




1.3 


Interfaces 




1.3 


Internal Connections 




1.4 


Theory of Operation Overview 




1.4 


Introduction 




1.4 


Modules and Functions 




1.8 


Keyboard and Keyswitch Identification 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Mar 90 Basics / 1 .1 



□ MACINTOSH AND MACINTOSH PLUS — DIFFERENCES 




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001 






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MICROPROCESSOR 



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00001 



00000000 

RAM 

00000000 



000 



12 3 4 5 6 



8 9 10 11 



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MACINTOSH 128K/512K LOGIC BOARD 



FIGURE 1 




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MACINTOSH PLUS 1 MEGABYTE LOGIC BOARD 



FIGURE 2 



i 



1 .2 / Basics 



rev. Mar 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 






Memory 



Macintosh 

128K or 512K bytes RAM 
64K bytes ROM 



Macintosh Plus 

1 MB RAM 

128K ROM 

256 bytes of 
user-selectable 
parameter memory 



Disk Capacity 



Macintosh 

400K bytes per disk 
single-sided 



Macintosh Plus 

800K bytes per disk 
double-sided 



Keyboard 



Macintosh 

58 key, software mapped 



Macintosh Plus 

78 key, software 
mapped, with 
built-in numeric 
keypad and 
direction keys 



Interfaces 



The numbers at the left of the list below correspond to 
the locations on both Figure 1 (Macintosh) and Figure 2 
(Macintosh Plus) unless otherwise noted. 



#1 



#2 
#3 
#4 



Two RS-232/RS-422 serial ports 
Macintosh uses DB-9 connectors 
Macintosh Plus uses 8-pin DIN connectors 
Mouse interface 
External disk interface 
Synchronous serial keyboard bus 



Macintosh Plus only (Figure 2) 

#5 Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) port: 
an industry-standard interface that provides 
extremely high-speed access to hard disks, tape 
backup systems, and other mass storage devices. 



Internal Connections 



The connector that runs from the power/sweep board to 
the logic board has been moved for the Macintosh Plus, 
as shown in Figures 1 and 2, #6. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .3 



□ THEORY OF OPERATION OVERVIEW 



Introduction 



Troubleshooting can be approached in many different 
ways. Apple recommends two methods in particular: 
logical troubleshooting and module swapping in a 
particular order for a particular symptom. Most 
troubleshooting charts in Apple Service Technical 
Procedures manuals are based upon the module- 
swapping method, but you can often save repair time by 
using logical troubleshooting before you start swapping. 



. 



Logical troubleshooting involves knowing the function 
of each module in the machine, and using that 
knowledge to narrow your search for the problem. This 
section will give you the information necessary to 
perform logical troubleshooting of the Macintosh and 
Macintosh Plus. The information here includes a 
description of each module in the Macintosh and 
Macintosh Plus and the various functions it performs. 
(For definitions of basic terms, refer to Section 4, 
Simplified Overview of a Microcomputer System, under 
the You Oughta Know tab.) 

Unless otherwise noted, all information included here 
is the same for the Macintosh and Macintosh Plus. 



Modules and Functions 



Macintosh modules and their functions are given below: 



Main Logic Board 



The Macintosh main logic board (Figure 3) is the heart 
of the system. It contains the components described 
below. A number after an IC in the descriptions that 
follow corresponds to a number in the figure to the left 
(indicating its general location on the logic board). 

The CPU, or 68000 microprocessor, gets instructions 
from memory, translates them, and carries them out. It 
communicates with all components on the logic board. 

The RAM, or storage capability, varies. The Macintosh 
can have 128K or 512K. The Macintosh Plus has 1 
megabyte of RAM installed on SIMM modules, which 
are mounted on the logic board. 

The ROMs (1 is HI, 2 is LO — see Figure 3) contain the 
operating code for the 68000. The Macintosh ROMs and 
the Macintosh Plus ROMs are different. Refer to 
Section 6, Additional Procedures, for specifics. 



1 .4 / Basics 



rev. Mar 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 




0000 1 
00001 



00000000 
00000000 



00 



12 3 4 5 6 



8 9 10 11 



FIGURE 3 

The IWM, or "Integrated Woz Machine" (named after 
Steve Wozniak), is a self-contained disk controller card 
on one IC. This IC supports both the internal and 
external disk drives. 






The SCC, or serial communications controller, handles 
the information received and sent from the two serial 
ports on the rear of the machine. The Macintosh has 
two nine-pin serial ports. The Macintosh Plus has two 
eight-pin DIN connectors. 

The VIA, or versatile interface adapter, is a dual-port 
parallel interface. This IC converts serial data (from 
input devices) to parallel data, so that the logic board 
can interpret the information correctly. It provides an 
interface for the mouse and the keyboard. 

The PALs, or programmable array logic (customized 
ICs), replace from five to ten ICs. They perform various 
control and synchronizing functions for the rest of the 
main logic board. 

The oscillator (timing device), generates the master 
clock pulse. The master clock pulse is broken down 
into various timing clocks needed by the ICs on the 
main logic board. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .5 



Power/Sweep Board 



The power/sweep board (Figure 4) is divided into two 
sections, described below. 



SWEEP (Ff^c 




w&ftsas-ffi ^ 



POWER 




FIGURE 4 

The speaker and the battery compartment are located on 
the power/sweep board. However, all the signals that 
operate these components are generated on the logic 
board; the power/sweep board does not use either of 
these items. 

The power supply section is located on the bottom half 
of the board. This is where the AC voltage is converted 
to DC voltage for use by the entire system. 

' The sweep section is located on the upper half of the 
board. There are circuits for both the horizontal and 
the vertical signals that are fed to the CRT. The flyback 
transformer is part of the sweep section and delivers 
high voltage directly to the CRT through the anode 
connector. 



CRT 



The CRT (cathode-ray tube) provides the high- 
resolution video display. The power/sweep board 
connects to the anode to apply high voltage to the CRT. 

The power/sweep board connects to the neck and to the 
yoke to supply various voltages and signals to the CRT 
to create the video display. 






1 .6 / Basics 



rev. Mar 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Disk Drives 



The internal disk drive connects to the main logic board 
through an internally installed connector. The external 
drive connects to the port on the back of the logic 
board. 



Reading and writing operations are controlled by the 
IWM on the logic board. The data passes through this 
IC on its way from the logic board to the disk in the 
drive, or from the disk drive to the logic board. 

The Macintosh has 400K disk drives. The Macintosh 
Plus has 800K disk drives. The 400K disks work on 
the 800K drives. The 800K disks do not work on the 
400K drives. 



Mouse 



The mouse connects to a nine-pin connector on the main 
logic board. The mouse is used to position the cursor 
on the screen. 






Keyboard 



The assemblies inside the mouse send a series of pulses 
to the SCC and the VIA. These ICs interpret and 
translate the information so that the logic board can 
utilize it. 



The keyboard connects to the logic board through a 
four- wire coil with a telephone-type connector. The 
keyboard has its own microprocessor, which is used to 
implement a serial bus for communicating with the logic 
board. 






The keyboard data is sent in serial form to the VIA, 
where it is converted into parallel data and translated 
so that the logic board can use it. 



Macintosh I Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .7 



□ KEYBOARD AND KEYSWITCH IDENTIFICATION 



The Macintosh keyboard without the numeric keypad 
uses Alps keyswitches (Figure 5). The locking 
keyswitch is used for the Caps Lock key, the other 
keyswitch for all other keys on the keyboard. 

The Macintosh Plus keyboard with the numeric keypad 
uses two versions of keyswitches, Alps and Mitsumi. 
The keyswitches are not interchangeable between 
boards. They can be identified by referring to Figure 5 
below. 

The procedure to replace a keyswitch is in Section 3, 
Keyswitch Replacement, under the You Oughta Know 
tab. 

Note: Macintosh foreign language keyboards use the 
same type of keyswitches as the U.S. Macintosh 
keyboards. 



i 



KEYSWITCH 



KEYBOARD 




705-0070 

ALPS LONG STEM 

("Extended") 

T 




705-0077 
ALPS ALPHA LOCK 
("Alternate Action") 



661-96154 
661-0322 




705-0104 

MITSUMI 

KEYSWITCH 




705-0044 

MITSUMI 

ALPHA LOCK KEYSWITCH 



661-0362 



FIGURE 5 



1 .8 / Basics 



rev. Mar 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh and Macintosh Plus 

Section 2 - Take-Apart 



□ CONTENTS 








2.3 


Electrostatic Discharge Prevention 




2.3 


Cover 




2.6 


Discharging the Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.6 


Discharge Procedure 




2.7 


Anode Cap 




2.9 


Power/Sweep Board 




2.12 


Logic Board 




2.15 


Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.17 


Internal Disk Drive 




2.19 


Chassis 




2.20 


Keyboard 



Note: If a step is underlined, detailed instructions for 
that step can be found elsewhere in this section. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. May 90 Take-Apart / 2.1 



□ ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE PREVENTION 



The Macintosh and the Macintosh Plus contain C-MOS 
components, and the Macintosh Plus RAM memory is 
installed on four small separate boards called SIMM 
modules. Both the C-MOS and the SIMM modules are 
very susceptible to ESD damage. 

Preventive measures must be taken to avoid ESD 
damage. When you are unwrapping, installing, or 
replacing any modules, observe the appropriate ESD 
precautions. 

For complete ESD prevention information, refer to You 
Oughta Know, Section 6. 



□ COVER 



Materials Required 



Pull-apart tool 
15-inch Torx screwdriver 
Soft cloth or foam pad 
Small, flat-blade screwdriver 



WARNING: Macintosh and Macintosh Plus computers 
contain high voltage and a high-vacuum picture tube. To 
prevent serious personal injury and property damage, be 
sure you read and understand the safety precautions in 
Section 8, CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab 
before you remove the back cover. Failure to follow the 
safety rules could result in serious injury. . 



Remove 



1. Turn the power off and disconnect the AC power 
cord from the source and from the back of the 
computer. 



Disconnect the mouse and all other external cables 
from the back of the computer. Disconnect the 
keyboard. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 90 



Take-Apart / 2.3 




) 



FIGURE 1 

3. Remove the reset/interrupt switch (if installed) by 
prying it off with a small flat-blade screwdriver 
(Figure 1, #1). 

4. Press down the tab at the top of the battery 
compartment cover (Figure 1, #2), and pull the tab 
toward you. 

5. Carefully place the computer face-down on a soft 
cloth or foam pad (to prevent scratching the bezel). 

6. Use a Torx screwdriver to remove the five screws 
(Figure 1, #3). 

7. Use the pull-apart tool to gently pry the cover 
loose. Carefully lift up the cover (there is a fragile 
picture tube inside), and set it out of the way. 

WARNING: The edges of the metal chassis may be 
sharp. When moving the computer with the cover 
removed, be sure to handle the metal chassis carefully. 






2.4 / Take- Apart 



rev. Mar 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Replace 



1. Make sure that the insulating paper is in the proper 
position (Figure 2, #1) and that all cables are 
connected. Carefully slide the cover back onto the 
computer and check to see that it is properly seated. 



2. Replace the five screws on the back of the 
computer. 

3. Replace the battery compartment cover. 

4. Replace the reset/interrupt switch if it was 
installed. 




FIGURE 2 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 90 



Take- Apart / 2.5 



□ DISCHARGING THE CATHODE-RAY TUBE 



Materials Required 



Safety goggles 

Foam pad (ungrounded) 

Needlenose pliers 

Alligator lead 

New CRT discharge tool (part number 076-0381) 

WARNING: Before starting, read the safety precautions 
and the CRT discharge procedure in Section 8, CRT 
Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. Alternative 
instructions for discharging the CRT using the older 
version of the discharge tool (and/or a screwdriver) are 
also given in that section. 



> 



Discharge 
Procedure 



1. Remove your grounding wriststrap and jewelry and 
put on safety goggles before beginning! 




FIGURE 3 



2. Attach the alligator clip on the CRT discharge tool 
to the metal part of the ground lug (Figure 3, #1). 

WARNING: If you discharge the Macintosh CRT to the 
metal chassis, the logic board may be destroyed because 
its circuitry is grounded to the chassis. You must 
discharge to the ground lug! ^^ 






2.6 / Take-Apart 



rev. Mar 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 






3. Put one hand in your pocket or behind your back 
and grasp the insulated handle of the CRT discharge 
tool. Insert the probe of the tool under the anode 
cap (Figure 3, #2) until it touches the anode ring. 

4. Remove the probe of the CRT discharge tool from 
under the anode cap. Remove the alligator clip from 
the ground lug. 

Note: The anode can build up voltage over time. To 
drain off any residual charges, establish an ongoing 
ground by fastening one end of an alligator lead to the 
ground lug and the other end to the anode aperture. 



Anode Cap 



For some procedures, you may have to remove the 
anode cap. To do so, peel back the anode cap until you 
can see the anode ring (or connector) at the center. 
Using needlenose pliers, compress the two prongs on 
the connector to free it from the anode aperture. 

To replace the anode cap, press together the two prongs 
of the anode connector so that you can insert it into the 
aperture. Tug on the anode wire to make sure it is 
firmly seated, then press down around the edges of the 
rubber anode cap to ensure a firm seal. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 90 



Take-Apart / 2.7 




FIGURE 4 




F 'GURE5 



2 -8 / Take-Aparf 



r ev. Feb 87 



Mac/ntosh/Macinto 



sh Plus 









□ POWER/SWEEP BOARD 



Materials Required 



Pull-apart tool 

15-inch Torx screwdriver 

Safety goggles 

Soft cloth or foam pad 

New Apple CRT discharge tool (part number 076-0381) 

WARNING: If you are using the older version of the 
discharge tool or a screwdriver with alligator leads, see 
the precautions in "Discharging the CRT" in Section 8, 
CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. 

If a new power/sweep board is installed, perform the 
voltage adjustment as shown in Section 5, Adjustments. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT to the 
ground hig . 

WARNING: Make sure the anode has been discharged 
before continuing. Failure to discharge the anode could 
result in serious injury. Also, if you discharge the 
Macintosh CRT to the metal chassis, the logic board may 
be destroyed. You must discharge to the ground lug! 

2. Remove the anode cap . 

3. Depress the tab on the yoke cable and unplug it 
(Figure 4, #1). 

4. Remove the main logic cable from the power/sweep 
board (Figure 4, #2). 

5. Remove the neck connector from the power/sweep 
board (Figure 4, #3). 



6. Turn the computer upright and remove the screw, 
lockwasher, and ground wire at the bottom of the 
chassis (Figure 4, #4). 

7. There are several versions of the insulating paper 
(Figure 5, #1). If there are no access holes for the 
three screws (Figure 5, #2), note how the paper is 
installed and then remove it. 

8. Remove three screws and washers (Figure 5, #2), 
and lift up and pull out the power/sweep board. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.9 




FIGURE 6 




2 -10/ Take-Apart 



FIGURE 7 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh/ Macintosh P/ Us 






Replace 1. Turn the computer upright and position the 

power/sweep board at the right hand side of the 
chassis. 

2. Connect the yoke cable (Figure 6, #1). 

3. Connect the main logic cable (Figure 6, #2). 

4. Slide the board into the slotted holders (Figure 7, 
#1) so that the three screw holes line up with the 
holes on the chassis (Figure 7, #2). 

5. Connect the CRT socket cable to the power/sweep 
board (Figure 6, #3). 

6. Replace the ground wire at the bottom of the chassis 
using a washer and Phillips head screw (Figure 6, 
#4). 

7. Replace the three screws and washers (Figure 7, 
#2). If replacement screws are needed, refer to 
Section 6, Additional Procedures. 

8. Replace the insulating paper if it has been removed 
(Figure 7, #3). 

9. Connect the anode connector to the CRT (Figure 6, 
#5). Put one prong of the connector in at an angle 
and push it against the edge of the anode ring. Then 
insert the other prong. 

10. Perform the voltage adjustment (refer to Section 5, 
Adjustments). 

11. Replace the cove r , 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Feb 87 Take-Apart / 2.1 1 



□ LOGIC BOARD 



Materials Required 



Pull-apart tool 

15-inch Torx screwdriver 

Safety goggles 

Soft cloth or foam pad 

New Apple CRT discharge tool (part number 076-0381) 



• 



WARNING: If you are using the older version of the 
discharge tool or a screwdriver with alligator leads, see 
the precautions in "Discharging the CRT" in Section 8, 
CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. 

Note: If a new logic board is installed, perform the 
voltage adjustment found in Section 5, Adjusments. 



Remove 



Remove the cover and discharge the CRT to the 
ground lug . 



WARNING: Make sure the anode has been discharged 
before continuing. Failure to discharge the anode could 
result in serious injury. Also, if you discharge the 
Macintosh CRT to the metal chassis, the logic board may 
be destroyed. You must discharge to the ground iugl 

2. Remove the main logic cable (Figure 8, #1) and the 
disk drive cable (Figure 8, #2) from the logic board. 




FIGURE 8 






2.12 /Take-Apart 



rev. Mar 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Replace 



CAUTION: DIP SIMMs, which may be installed on the 
logic board, are larger than other RAM SIMMs and can be 
easily damaged when removing the logic board. Use 
extra care when removing the logic board. 

3. Turn the computer face down. Gently slide the main 
logic board up and out of the chassis. Pull back 
(away from the chassis) on the top of the logic board 

while sliding it out so that any installed DIP SIMMs 
do not catch on the chassis. 



If you are replacing the logic board of an enhanced 512K 
system, or a 512K system with an 800K disk drive, you 
must swap ROMs from the customer's faulty logic board 
to the replacement logic board. Swapping the ROMs 
will ensure that you do not downgrade the customer's 
system. For additional information, see "ROM Version 
Compatibility" in Section 6, Additional Procedures. 




FIGURE 9 

Note: If you are replacing a bad Macintosh Plus logic 
board with a rev. D (or higher) replacement board, you 
should install a ground clip (Figure 9, #1) to the inner 
plastic lip on the bottom front bezel (below the 
keyboard connector opening). You can identify a 
revision D replacement board by the part number; the 
part number has the format 820-xxxx-D. Do not use the 
ground clip with any logic board lower than rev. D. 

CAUTION: Contact between the ground clip and pins or 
solder points on the underside of the logic board could 
cause a short, resulting in erratic keyboard behavior. 
Make sure the clip does not touch any solder points. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 91 



Take-Apart/ 2.13 




I 



FIGURE 10 

1. Gently slide the main logic board into the chassis 
until it is firmly seated. 

2. Connect the main logic cable (Figure 10, #1) and the 
disk drive cable (Figure 10, #2). 

3. Perform the voltage adjustment (refer to Section 5, 
Adjustments). 

4. Replace the cover (be sure the insulating paper is 
installed). 






2.14 /Take-Apart 



rev. Feb 89 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ CATHODE-RAY TUBE (CRT) 



Materials Required 



Pull-apart tool 

15-inch Torx screwdriver 

Safety goggles 

Soft cloth or foam pad 

New Apple CRT discharge tool (part number 076-0381) 

WARNING: If you are using the older version of the 
discharge tool or a screwdriver with alligator leads, see 
the precautions in "Discharging the CRT" in Section 8, 
CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT to the 
ground lug . 



WARNING: Make sure the anode has been discharged 
before continuing. Failure to discharge the anode could 
result in serious Injury. Also, if you discharge the 
Macintosh CRT to the metal chassis, the logic board may 
be destroyed. You must discharge to the ground lug! 

2. Remove the power/sweep board . 




FIGURE 11 

Place the computer face-down on a cloth or foam 
pad. Remove the four screws that fasten the CRT 
(Figure 11, #1) and the ground wire (Figure 11, #2). 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.15 




I 



FIGURE 12 

4. Gently remove the CRT socket cable (Figure 12, #3) 
by sliding it straight out from the neck. 

WARNING: Handle the CRT by its sides only, not the 
neck. Do not touch the anode. 

5. Remove the CRT. 

WARNING: If you need to dispose of the CRT, refer to 
"Disposing of the Cathode-Ray Tube" in Section 8, CRT 
Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. 



Replace 1. Set the CRT in the case with the anode facing away 

from the power/sweep board (see Figure 12). 

2. Connect the original CRT socket cable. A new CRT 
may have a small retainer on the neck pins. Remove 
it before replacing the CRT socket cable. 

3. Replace the four CRT screws (Figure 12, #1). Be 
sure to reinstall the ground wire (Figure 12, #2). 






2.16 / Take-Apart rev. Mar 90 Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 






□ INTERNAL DISK DRIVE 



Materials Required 



Pull-apart tool 

15-inch Torx screwdriver 

Safety goggles 

Soft cloth or foam pad 

New Apple CRT discharge tool (part number 076-0381) 

WARNING: If you are using the older version of the 
discharge tool or a screwdriver with alligator leads, see 
the precautions in "Discharging the CRT" in Section 8, 
CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT to the 
ground lug . 

WARNING: Make sure the anode has been discharged 
before continuing. Failure to discharge the anode could 
result in serious Injury. Also, if you discharge the 
Macintosh CRT to the metal chassis, the logic board may 
be destroyed. You must discharge to the ground lug! 

2. Remove the main logic board . Verify that the 
correct revision of ROM is installed. (Refer to 
Section 6, Additional Procedures.) 



3. Turn the computer over and place it face down on a 
foam pad or soft cloth. 

4. Locate the four Phillips screws that hold the disk 
drive and mounting bracket in position. Remove 
them from the chassis. 

5. Slide the disk drive out of the chassis. 

Note: All 400K drive mechanisms are shipped in their 
original internal drive shields. To exchange an 800K 
drive mechanism, you must first remove the drive 
mechanism from its original internal drive shield and 
install it in the Apple-approved packaging-and-shipping 
fixture. You should also install the dummy packing 
disk. See Figure 7 in the Illustrated Parts List for 
additional information. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.17 



Replace 



Read "800K Diskette Ejection Problems" in Section 6, 
Additional Procedures, before replacing the disk drive. 

Replacement 800K disk drive mechanisms should be 
installed in the customer's original internal drive 
shield. For 800K drives, you must first remove the 
shipping fixture and packing disk from the replacement 
drive mechanism before installing it in the original 
internal drive shield. 



Examine the chassis and determine whether the 
mounting holes for the screws are round or oval. 
perform the appropriate procedure below. 



Then 



Round 
Mounting Holes 



1. Slide the new drive into position. 

2. Align the mounting screw holes and tighten the four 
screws. 



Verify the placement of the disk drive by inserting 
a disk into the disk drive and checking that the 
disk slides in and out of the drive without rubbing 
against the case. 

3. Replace the main logic board and cover (be sure the 
insulating paper is installed). 



Oval 
Mounting Holes 



1. Slide the new drive into position. 

2. Align the front of the drive with the plastic stops 
on the front of the bezel. Insert and tighten the 
four mounting screws. 

Verify the placement of the disk drive by inserting 
a disk into the disk drive and checking that the 
disk slides in and out of the drive without rubbing 
against the case. 

3. Replace the main logic board and cover (be sure the 
insulating paper is installed). 






2.18 /Take-Apart 



rev. Jul 89 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ CHASSIS 



Not all Macintosh chassis are designed the same way. 
However, the following procedure can be used to 
replace any Macintosh or Macintosh Plus chassis. 



Materials Required 



Pull-apart tool 

15-inch Torx screwdriver 

Safety goggles 

Small flat-blade screwdriver 

Soft cloth or foam pad 

New Apple CRT discharge tool (part number 076-0381) 

WARNING: If you are using the older version of the 
discharge tool or a screwdriver with alligator leads, see 
the precautions in "Discharging the CRT" in Section 8, 
CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT to the 
ground hig . 

WARNING: Make sure the anode has been discharged 
before continuing. Failure to discharge the anode could 
result in serious injury. Also, if you discharge the 
Macintosh CRT to the metal chassis, the logic board may 
be destroyed. You must discharge to the ground lug! 

2. Remove the power/sweep board . 

3. Remove the main logic board . 

4. Remove the internal disk drive . 

5. With the computer face-down on a foam pad or soft 
cloth, remove the five torx screws that secure the 
chassis to the front bezel, and lift out the chassis. 



Replace 



1. Position the replacement chassis on the front bezel, 
and install the five torx screws. 

2. Replace the internal disk drive . 

3. Replace the main logic board . 

4. Replace the power/sweep board . 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. May 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.19 



5. Perform the voltage adjustment (refer to Section 5, 
Adjustments). 

6. Replace the cover (be sure the insulating paper is 
installed). 



i 



□ KEYBOARD 



Exchanging 
the Keyboard 



If you are exchanging the keyboard, do not remove 
the keyboard mechanism. Send the entire unit 
(without the cable) in for exchange. The procedure 
below is to be used for replacing keyswitches only. 



Materials Required 



Medium Phillips screwdriver 



Remove 



1. Disconnect the keyboard from the Macintosh or 
Macintosh Plus. 



2. Remove the six screws from the back of the 
keyboard. Remove the top plastic cover. 

3. Lift the mechanical assembly out of the bottom case. 

4. Use the replacement procedures for Macintosh 
keyswitches in You Oughta Know. To identify the 
keyswitches, refer to Section 1, Basics. 



Replace 



1. Set the mechanical assembly back into the bottom 
case. 



2. Position the top plastic cover. 

3. Hold the cover in place, turn the keyboard over, and 
install the six screws. 






2.20 / Take-Apart 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



fl Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh and Macintosh Plus 

Section 3 - Diagnostics 

□ CONTENTS 



3.2 


Introduction 


3.2 


MacTest 


3.2 


How to Use It 


3.3 


Things to Remember 


3.5 


Backup Procedure 


3.10 


Running MacTest 


3.11 


Materials Required 


3.12 


Pull-down Menus and Icons 


3.12 


512K 


3.12 


Select Test 


3.14 


Options 


3.15 


Apple 


3.16 


Miscellaneous Icons 


3.16 


Running the Diagnostic 


3.19 


Error Codes 



Note: Always use the most recent revision of MacTest. 
Refer to the Apple Service Programs Manual for the 
number of the latest revision. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Pius rev. Feb 87 Diagnostics / 3.1 



□ INTRODUCTION 



MacTest 



This section describes general procedures for using the 
MacTest diagnostic disk to test the Macintosh and 
Macintosh Plus logic board and disk drives. MacTest is 
a pass/fail diagnostic test, which indicates the area 
being tested and the kind of test being performed when 
a failure occurs. 



■ 



How to Use It 



The MacTest disk is used to identify module failures of 
the main logic board, keyboard, keypad, and disk drives 
on the 128K and 512K Macintosh as well as the 1024K 
Macintosh Plus. 



Before running MacTest, read the section entitled 
"Things To Remember." 

If you cannot boot the disk, check the power cable and 
internal cable connections. If all the cables are secure, 
turn to Section 3, Troubleshooting, and replace the 
module(s) specified for the problem you are 
experiencing. Attempt to boot the disk after each 
module swap to check whether the problem has been 
solved. 

Replace modules when indicated by test results. Verify 
that the problem has been corrected by retesting with 
the diagnostic disk. If correct operation is still not 
obtained, turn to the Troubleshooting section and 
follow its instructions. 

If you receive an error code while attempting to run 
MacTest, check the list at the end of this section for 
what you can do to correct the problem. 






3.2 / Diagnostics 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ THINGS TO REMEMBER 



Backup Information 



1. Make a backup diskette before you begin! When 
testing a defective Macintosh or Macintosh Plus, it 
is possible to erase and/or damage a section of the 
MacTest diskette. 



There are two copy routines included on the 
MacTest diskette. Be sure to follow the 
instructions included in this section under "Backup 
Procedure." 



Loopback Information 



2. Identify the machine as a Macintosh or a Macintosh 
Plus. Connect the correct loopbacks for the machine 
you are testing (see "Materials Required" for more 
information). 



Powering Off 



3. Whenever a dialog box appears indicating that an 
item is not connected or installed (keyboard or 
loopbacks, for example), click in the OK box. The 
test sequence will be aborted and an error code 
will be displayed. Connect the item and/or deselect 
the test from the Select Test menu, reboot, and run 
the diagnostic again. 

4. If the loopback cable and/or the SCSI loopback test 
card are not connected, be sure to deselect Serial 
Loopback and/or SCSI Loopback [Mac+] under the 
Select Test menu, and save the new configuration. 

If you do not deselect the tests, a dialog box will 
appear asking if the loopback cables are installed. 
Click in the OK box. The test sequence will 
automatically abort 

5. If the loopback cable and/or the SCSI loopback test 
card are installed, be sure to select Serial Loopback 
and/or SCSI Loopback [Mac+] under the Select Test 

menu, and save the new configuration. If you do not 
select the tests, the ports will not be tested. 

6. If you are using the SCSI loopback test card it must 
be correctly installed or the Macintosh Plus will be 
"recognized" as a 512K Macintosh. 

7. To eject the MacTest diskette, pull down the 
Options menu and select Shutdown. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Feb 87 



Diagnostics / 3.3 



Saving Configurations 



DeskTop Appears 



8. Under Options is an item called Save Configuration. 

This option allows you to save a favorite 
configuration on the diskette. The name of the file 
must be Options.OPTN to run. 

9. If the MacTest window does not appear but a screen 
with desktop and file icons does appear, you will 
need to: 



i 



Stopping Continuous Test 



a) Open the MacTest diskette icon, and highlight 
the MacTest file icon. 

b) Pull down the Special menu and select Set 
Startup. 

The internal disk drive will whir for a few 
seconds and stop. 

c) Reboot the MacTest diskette. 

10. To stop the continuous test, do the following (the 
mouse will respond slowly): 



a) Pull down the Options menu and select Auto 
Run Not Selected. 

b) Pull down the Options menu and select Save 
Configuration. 

The new configuration will be saved. The 
continuous test will stop after the next reboot 
cycle. 



Desk Accessories 



11. All Desk Accessories must be closed before running 
MacTest. 



External Drives 



12. MacTest cannot test an external drive that is 
connected through a Hard Disk 20. 






3.4 / Diagnostics 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ BACKUP PROCEDURE 



400K Drive Copy 



800K Drive Copy 



Two copy programs are included on the MacTest 
diskette for your convenience. Both routines require 
two disk drives. 

The destination diskette for the 400K Drive Copy must 
be a double-sided diskette, but it must be inserted into 
a 400K external disk drive. 

The 800K Drive Copy program must be run on the 
Macintosh Plus with 1024K of memory. The program 
will allow you to format and copy to either double- or 
single-sided diskettes. 



Procedure 



1. Write protect the MacTest diskette. 

2. Insert the MacTest diskette, and power on the 
system. 

The Service MacTest window will appear. 

3. Pull down the Options menu and select Quit to 
Finder. 

The drive will whir, and the desktop will appear 
with the MacTest diskette displayed in the upper 
right-hand corner. 

4. Open the MacTest diskette icon. 

The following file icons should be displayed. 



MacTest Disk 



6 items 



321Kindisk 



78K available 



O 



System Folder 800K Drive Copy MACTEST 

□ <^ 

Options .OPTN 400K Drive Copy 



M. 



J2 



o 



a 



5. Open either the 400K Drive Copy or the 800K 

Drive Copy icon. Follow the apropriate instructions 
on the next few pages. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Feb 87 



Diagnostics/ 3.5 



400K Drive Copy 



1. The following window will appear. 



i 



Format-Copy Utilities 



Notes- 



r 


1 n lernu 1 - 
MacTest Disk 




c 
c 
c 

c 
c 
c 






get file ] 








copy disk > ] 








format disk ] 








zero disk ] 








uerify disk ] 








Lur boot blk ] 








eject disk ] 



Ex lernu 1 

No Diskette Inserted 




( get file ] 




[ < copy disk ] 




[ format disk ] 




( zero disk ] 




[ uerify disk ] 




[ wr boot blk ] 




[ eject disk ] 



Dialog Box Appears 



The message under Internal Disk should be 
"MacTest." 

2. Insert a blank or a diskette you wish to copy over 
(double-sided) into the external drive. If a dialog 
box appears asking "Do you want to initialize it?": 

a) Click in the box labeled Initialize. 

b) A dialog box will appear asking you to name the 
diskette. Enter a name and then click in the box 
labeled OK. 

c) The copy window will again be displayed. The 
name of the diskette in the external drive will 
appear in the block labeled External Drive. 

d) Continue to step 3. 



...Continued on next page 



3.6 /Diagnostics 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



No Dialog Box Appears 



If the dialog box does not appear: 

a) The name of the diskette will appear in the 
block labeled External Drive. 



b) Under the box labeled External is a column of 
boxes with various commands. Click in the box 
labeled Format. The external drive will whir 
and the message "Disk Format In Progress" will 
appear in the box labeled Notes. On completion 
the message "Disk Format Was Successful" will 
appear in the box labeled Notes. 

c) Continue to step 3. 

3. Under the box labeled Internal is a column of boxes 
with various commands. Click on the box labeled 
<CopyDisk>. 

The message "Disk Copy In Progress" will appear in 
the box labeled Notes. The drives will whir for a 
few minutes. The external drive will eject the 
diskette on completion of the copy. The message 
"Disk Successfully Copied" will appear under the 
box labeled Notes. 

4. You now have two choices: 

If you wish to make additional copies: 

a) Insert a blank or a diskette you wish to copy 
over into the external drive. 

b) Repeat steps 2 and 3. 

c) Repeat steps 4a and b until you have the number 
of copies you desire. 

If you wish to quit making copies, pull down the 
Utility menu and select Quit. The desktop will 
appear. 

You now have one or more copies of the MacTest 
diskette. Place the original in a safe place. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Feb 87 



Diagnostics / 3.7 



800K Drive Copy 



1. The following window will appear. 



Disk Duplication 



Master Disk- 



MacTest Disk — >One sided format 



[ DouunLoad j 



[ Eject Disk ) 



Loader- 



No tes- 



Hemory avai lable:87018 

Doub I e-S i ded bu f f ers a I I oca ted . 



Done: 



Passed : 



Rejected: 



i 



Wait till the Watch icon disappears. 

2. Click in the box labeled DownLoad. 

The message "Disk Download in progress...." will 
appear in the box labeled Notes. The drive will 
whir for approximately one minute, and then it will 
eject the MacTest diskette. The message "Disk 
Successfully Downloaded" will appear in the box 
labeled Notes. 

3. Insert a blank or a diskette you wish to copy over 
(double-sided) into the external disk drive. 

4. Click in the box labeled Start. 

The message "Format/Copy in progress" will appear 
in the box labeled Notes. The drive will whir, and 
the message will change to "Verify in progress." 
The message will change to "Disk Copy is 
successful" and the copy will be ejected from the 
external disk drive. 






3.8/ Diagnostics 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 






5. You now have two choices. 

a) If you wish to make additional copies: 

1) Insert a blank or a diskette you wish to copy 
over into the external drive. 

The program will make another copy without 
any commands being entered. 

2) Repeat this until you have the number of 
copies you desire. 

b) If you wish to quit making copies. 

1) Click in the box labeled Stop. 

2) Pull down the Options menu and select Quit. 

3) Insert the MacTest diskette, as instructed in 
the dialog box. 

The desktop will return. 

You now have a copy of the MacTest diskette. Place 
the original in a safe place. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Feb 87 Diagnostics / 3.9 



□ RUNNING MACTEST 



I 



Materials Required 



Identify which Macintosh you have by examining the 
connectors on the rear of the machine (see Section 1, 
Basics). Locate the following equipment for the 
Macintosh or for the Macintosh Plus. 



Note. The loopback equipment does not need to be 
installed to run the diagnostic. However, to test the 
machine completely the loopbacks should be used. 
Refer to "Things to Remember" at the beginning of this 
section. 



Macintosh 



MacTest diagnostic diskette 

DB 9 Serial Port Plug (Set of 2) 

Blank 400K formatted diskette for External Drive Test 



The DB 9 loopback connectors should be installed on 
the two serial ports on the rear of the machine. 



Macintosh Plus 



MacTest diagnostic diskette 

DIN-8 to DIN-8 Serial Port Cable (loopback connector) 

SCSI Loopback Test Card 

Blank formatted 400K diskette for External Drive Test 



The loopback cable with DIN-8 connectors should be 
installed between the two serial ports on the rear of 
the machine. 



TO SCSI PORT ON REAR 
OF MACINTOSH PLUS 



TO MOUSE PORT ON REAR 
OF THE MACINTOSH PLUS 



fc= 



CONNECT THE MOUSE HERE 




FIGURE 1 






3.10/ Diagnostics 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



The SCSI Loopback Test Card should be connected to 
the Macintosh Plus (Figure 1). The cable connected to 
the SCSI port will need to be folded over in order to 
reach the port on the Macintosh Plus. 

CAUTION: Always power off the system when you 
connect or disconnect the SCSI loopback card 

The new-style mouse with the small connector must be 
used. Gently jiggle the mouse connector onto the board 
at the location indicated below. 



Pull-Down 
Menus and 
Icons 



The following window should appear (on a 512K 
Macintosh). 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^= Coriiir-ck MnrToct ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^= 












HPjHptffc 








fi§§:ji§ 




=> 




START 

L ) 




. 


] 
















r > 
PRSS 




FAIL 

) 



















The following pages will explain how to use and what 
to expect from each of the features listed under the 
four pull-down menus. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Sep 89 



Diagnostics/ 3.11 



51 2K 



Memo 



i 



Memory Size 



This pull-down menu indicates the amount of memory in 
the Macintosh or Macintosh Plus you are working on. 
For a 128K machine, 128K would be displayed. For the 
Macintosh Plus, 1024K Mac+ would be displayed. 



Select Test 



Select Test 



Uideo Alignment Screen 
v'Main Logic I, encept RAM Tests 
•Main Logic II, RAM Tests 
v/Short RAM Tests, [3 Min per 51 2K] 

Long RAM Tests, [6 min per 512K] 
^/Serial LoopBack 
•SCSI UiGpliwk [M<k • only! 
^Internal Disk Driue 

EKternal Disk Driue 



The Select Test menu lists the various tests available to 
you. 

To select a test, pull down the menu and highlight the 
test you want, then release the mouse button. Pull 
down the menu again and notice the check mark that has 
appeared. 

To deselect a test, pull down the menu and highlight 
the test you want, then release the mouse button. If 
you pull down the menu again, you will notice that the 
check mark is gone. The tests are described below. 



Video Alignment 
Screen 



The Video Alignment Screen is a white screen, with 
twelve grayscale squares for focus. The screen may be 
used to properly align and focus the video display. 



Main Logic I, 
except RAM Tests 




When selected, the Main Logic I verifies the working 
condition of various hardware items on the board. 






3.12/ Diagnostics 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



The loopbacks do not have to be installed to run this 
test. However, if they are not installed, the Serial 
Loopback and SCSI Loopback [Mac+] tests should be 
deselected. 

If the loopback tests are selected but the loopbacks are 
not installed, a dialog box will appear asking if the 
loopback connectors are installed: click in the OK box. 
The test sequences will automatically abort when you 
click in the OK box. Then you can either deselect the 
tests for the ports, save the configuration, and rerun 
MacTest, or install the loopbacks and rerun MacTest. 

If the loopback cables are installed and you want the 
ports tested, you will need to select one or both of the 
loopback tests and save the configuration. 

The icon shown above is displayed in the Service 
MacTest window when this test is being performed. 



Main Logic II, 
RAM Tests 




When selected, the Main Logic n, RAM Tests option 
verifies the RAM installed on the logic board. In order 
to test the RAM completely, you also need to select 
either the Short RAM Tests [3 MIN per 512K] or the 
Long RAM Tests [6 Min per 512K]. These selections 
will determine how long the RAM will be tested. 
When the RAM test is running, the menu bar at the top 
of the screen will flash slowly. 

The icon above is displayed in the Service MacTest 

window when this test is being performed. 



Internal Disk Drive 




When selected, the Internal Disk Drive test verifies 
the functionality of the internal disk drive. The icon 
above is displayed in the Service MacTest window 
when this test is being performed. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Feb 87 



Diagnostics/ 3.13 



External Disk Drive 




i 



When selected, the External Disk Drive test verifies 
the functionality of the external drive. Insert a blank 
formatted diskette into the external drive before 
testing. The icon above is displayed in the Service 
MacTest window when this test is being performed. 



Options 



Options 



Shorn GoNoGo Window 



Ruto Run Selected 
v/fluto Run Not Selected 
Saue Configuration 



Quit to Finder 
Shut Down 



This Options menu lists the various features available 
when using the MacTest diskette. Check marks indicate 
options that are currently selected. 



Auto Run Selected 



Auto Run allows you to run the Logic I, Logic II (which 
must be selected) and Internal Disk Drive tests in a 
continuous loop. Appropriate loopback connectors must 
be installed to use the Automatic Run feature 
effectively. The External Disk Drive test may be 
selected, but it will run only once. Under Auto-Run 
MacTest will run automatically until a failure occurs. 
To stop the automatic test sequence, refer to Things to 
Remember. 



Auto Run Not Selected 



If Auto Run Not Selected is displayed, MacTest will run 
each selected test once and will then reboot and display 
the results with an icon. 



3.14 /Diagnostics 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Save Configuration 



IMPORTANT: The diskette must be unlocked before you 
try to save a configuration. The program does not warn 
you when the disk is locked. 

Save Configuration allows you to customize your 
MacTest diskette. Select the tests you want to run and 
select this feature. A window will appear with a file 
named Options.OPTN displayed. Click in the Save box. 

The file you save must be named "Options.OPTN" to run. 



Quit to Finder 



Quit to Finder returns you to the desktop with the disk 
and file icons displayed. 



Shut Down 
Apple 



Shutdown ejects the diskette and reboots the system. 



Alarm Clock 

Calculator 

Key Caps, Macintosh 

Key Caps, Macintosh Plus 

Note Pad 

Macintosh T*?s1 Software B 

BOM uersion 10069 



The Apple (#) menu allows you to test the keyboard, 
keypad, and speaker for the machine you are testing. 
Perform the logic board test before performing any of 
these tests. 

IMPORTANT: All desk accessories must be closed before 
running MacTest 



Calculator 



When selected, Calculator displays a window with a 
calculator. Press each key on the keypad and verify 
that it is highlighted in the window. If a key is not 
highlighted, the keyswitch is bad and the numeric 
keypad (Macintosh) or the keyboard (Macintosh Plus) 
should be replaced. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Feb 87 



Diagnostics/ 3.15 



Key Caps 



There are two Key Caps tests, one for the Macintosh 
and one for the Macintosh Plus. Choose the appropriate 
test. When selected, this feature displays a window 
with a keyboard. Press each key on the keyboard and 
verify that the display block for that key is highlighted. 
If the key is not highlighted, the keyswitch is bad and 
the keyswitch should be replaced. If numerous keys 
are not highlighted, exchange the keyboard. 



> 



Miscellaneous Icons 




Pass 



If all tests pass, the Macintosh/Macintosh Plus reboots 
after a few minutes, briefly highlights the PASS icon 
box, and displays a "happy face" icon like the one above. 



Fail 






If a test fails, a bad module is indicated by a "sad face" 
icon of the specific module. If any test fails, the tests 
stop running and the FAIL icon box is highlighted. The 
icons are (above from left to right): the logic board, the 
internal disk drive, and the external disk drive. 



Running the 
Diagnostic 



The following are abbreviated procedures for running a 
standard test, a customized test, or a continuous test. 
The amount of time you need to run the diagnostic will 
range from two minutes to twenty minutes, depending 
on your machine and the tests you select. 



If you need additional information, refer to "Things to 
Remember" and "Pull-Down Menus and Icons." 



Standard 



The MacTest disk is shipped configured to run the 
Logic I test, Logic II test, and the Internal Drive tests. 



1. Install the appropriate connectors for the machine 
you are testing. 






3.16 /Diagnostics 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



2. Turn on the machine. 

An icon of a disk with a flashing question mark 
should appear. 

3. Insert the MacTest disk into the internal drive. 

The Service MacTest window should appear. The 
amount of memory will be displayed in the menu 
bar. 

4. Click the Start icon box. 

MacTest will run the tests selected under the menu 
Select Test. 

If the tests pass, the machine will reboot and the 
"happy Macintosh" icon will appear. 

If a test fails, a "sad Macintosh" icon of the bad 
module will appear. 

5. Pull down the Apple menu and perform the Key 
Caps and Calculator tests, if applicable. 



Customized 



This test allows you to select the modules you want to 
test, be it one module or any combination of modules. 

1. If the logic board is to be tested, install the 
appropriate loopback connectors for the machine you 
are testing. 

2. Turn on the machine. 

An icon of a disk with a flashing question mark 
should appear. 

3. Insert the MacTest disk into the internal drive. 

The Service MacTest window should appear. The 
amount of memory will be displayed in the menu 
bar. 

4. Select the test(s) you want to run from the Select 
Test pull-down menu. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 89 



Diagnostics/ 3.17 



5. On completion, pull down the Options menu and 
select Save Configuration. 

A dialog box will appear with the message "Save 
Test Data as: Options. OPTN." 

Click in the Save box. 

A dialog box will appear asking, "Replace existing 
Options. OPTN?" 

Click in the Yes box. 

The disk will whir for a few seconds and the 
Service MacTest window will be displayed. 

6. Click in the Start icon box. 

MacTest will run the tests selected under the menu 
Select Test. 

If the tests pass, the machine will reboot and the 
"happy face" icon will appear. 

If a test fails, a "sad face" icon of the bad module 
will appear. 



i 



Continuous 



This test allows you to run the Logic I test, the Logic II 
test, and the Internal Disk Drive test continuously or 
overnight to check for intermittent problems. 

1. The appropriate loopbacks must be installed to use 
the continuous test feature effectively. 

2. Turn on the machine. 

An icon of a diskette with a flashing question mark 
should appear. 

3. Insert the MacTest diskette into the internal drive. 

The Service MacTest window should appear. The 
amount of memory will be displayed in the menu 
bar. 

4. Verify that the tests listed above are selected in the 
Select Test pull-down menu. 

If they are not selected, select them now. 

5. On completion, pull down the Options menu and 
select Auto Run Selected. 



3.18/ Diagnostics 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



6. Then pull down the Options menu and select Save 
Configuration. 

A dialog box will appear with the message "Save 
Test Data as: Options. OPTN". 

Click in the Save box. 

A dialog box will appear asking "Replace existing 
Options. OPTN?" 

Click in the Yes box. 

The disk will whir for a few seconds and the 
Service MacTest window will be displayed. 

7. Click in the Start icon box. 

MacTest will run the tests selected under the menu 
Select Test. 

If the tests pass, the machine will reboot and the 
"happy face" icon will appear. The cycle will be 
repeated continuously until stopped. 

If a test fails, a "sad face" icon of the bad module 
will appear and the testing will stop. 

8. To stop the continuous test do the following: 

a) Pull down the Options menu and select Auto 
Test Not Selected. 

b) Pull down the Options menu and select Save 
Configuration. 

The new configuration will be saved and the continuous 
test will stop after the next reboot cycle. 



Error Codes Error codes may appear when you run the MacTest 

diskette. The following chart lists the various error 
codes that may be displayed (the X's in the error code 
can be ignored) and the things you should check to 
correct the problems. 

Before using the chart, verify that you are using a 
known-good MacTest diskette. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Feb 87 Diagnostics / 3.1 9 



If an error code is displayed, find it in the list below 
and check the items listed to the right. After each step, 
run MacTest to see if the error code is still displayed. 



i 



Error Code 

100XX.XXXX 



Things to Check 



1. Keyboard connected correctly? 

2. Exchange keyboard cable. 

3. Exchange keyboard. 

4. Exchange logic board. 



200XX.XXXX 



1 Appropriate loopback connectors installed? 

2. Dialog box appeared asking if cables were 
connected? 

3. Loopback connectors work OK on another machine? 

4. Exchange logic board. 



300XX.XXXX 



1. Check items listed for 200XX. 

2. Exchange logic board. 



400XXXXXX 



1. MacTest diskette unlocked? 

2. Exchange internal disk drive. 



500XXXXXX 



1. Blank formatted 400K diskette installed in external 
disk drive before running test? 

2. Formatted diskette unlocked? 

3. Exchange external disk drive. 



600XXXXXX 



- Exchange Logic Board. 



Macintosh Plus Error ONLY 



800XX.XXXX 



1. SCSI Loopback Test Card connected? 

2. Dialog box appeared asking if cables were 
connected? 

3. SCSI Loopback Test Card works OK on another 
machine? 

4. Exchange logic board. 






3.20 / Diagnostics 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



ft Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh and Macintosh Plus 

Section 4 - Troubleshooting 



□ CONTENTS 








4.2 


Introduction 




4.2 


General Information 




4.2 


Before You Start 




4.2 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




4.2 


Exchanging the Logic Board 




4.2 


Exchanging the Power/Sweep Board 




4.3 


Things to Remember 




4.4 


Symptom Chart 




4.4 


Video Problems 




4.5 


Drive Problems 




4.7 


Peripheral Problems 




4.8 


Miscellaneous Problems 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Sep 89 Troubleshooting / 4.1 



□ INTRODUCTION 

General 
Information 



i 



Use this troubleshooting section if the diagnostics are 
unable to detect a module failure or if the diagnostic 
disk cannot be booted. After you repair the system, run 
the diagnostic test to verify system operation. 



Before You 
Start 



Read the section entitled "Things to Remember" before 
you begin troubleshooting. There are a number of 
things you should know about the Macintosh or 
Macintosh Plus to troubleshoot them effectively. 



How to Use 
the Symptom 
Chart 



Use the left-hand column to find the symptom that most 
nearly describes the problem of the defective unit. For 
that symptom, perform the corrective action(s) in the 
order listed. If a corrective action does not fix the 
problem, proceed to the next step. If a board is 
replaced but does not fix the problem, the original 
board should be reinstalled before you perform the 
next step. 



Exchanging the 
Logic Board 



Boot ROMs for the Macintosh Plus and Macintosh 512K 
enhanced systems exist in several versions that cannot 
be mixed on the same logic board. For more 
information, see "ROM Version Compatibility" in 
Section 6, Additional Procedures. 



When exchanging 512K logic boards, make sure that 
you do not downgrade the customer's system. If the 
customer has a 512K enhanced system (new ROMs 
installed on the logic board), you will need to swap 
ROMs so that the customer keeps the same ROMs. 
Refer to "ROM Version Compatibility" in Section 6, 
Additional Procedures, for more information. 



Exchanging the 

Power/Sweep 

Board 



When sending Apple a defective power/sweep board 
from a Macintosh or Macintosh Plus, be sure to include 
the power/sweep-to-logic-board cable. Make sure the 
contrast control knob and battery have been removed 
from the defective board and reinstalled onto the 
exchange board. 






4.2 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Sep 88 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ THINGS TO REMEMBER 






1. Follow the basic ESD precautions when 
troubleshooting. (Refer to Section 2, Take-Apart, 
for more information.) 

2. Be sure you read all the safety precautions before 
removing or installing any modules (refer to Section 
1, Basics). 

3. Be sure you discharge the CRT before removing or 
installing any modules. (Refer to Section 2, Take- 
Apart, for specific information.) 

4. Be sure the software you use is known-good. Bad 
software can produce symptoms that appear to be 
hardware problems. 

5. When exchanging the logic board or the 
power/sweep board, you must adjust the voltage. 
(Refer to Section 5, Adjustments, for complete 
instructions.) 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Feb 87 Troubleshooting / 4.3 



□ SYMPTOM CHART 



Video Problems Solutions 



. 



• No video, but audio 1. 

tone is present and 2. 

drive operates 3. 



Turn contrast control fully clockwise. 
Check video cable connections. 
Replace neck cable. 
Replace power/sweep board. 
Replace logic board. 



Screen is bright 1. 

and audio is present, 2. 
but no video information 
is present 



Replace power/sweep board. 
Replace logic board. 






4.4 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Sep 89 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Drive Problems 



Solutions 



IMPORTANT: When exchanging an 800K drive, either 
internal or external, refer to Section 6, Additional 
Procedures, for exchange module compatibility 
information. 



Disk ejects; display 
shows disk icon 
with blinking "X" 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Replace drive cable. 

3. Replace disk drive. 

4. Replace logic board. 



• Unable to insert 
disk all the way 



1. Insert a paper clip into the small hole beside the 
drive slot, -or power off the system and hold the 
mouse button down while powering on to ensure 
the eject cycle has been' completed. Then insert the 
disk with the metal slot forward and the write- 
protect tab on the bottom. 

2. Replace the disk drive. 



Drive will not eject 
disk 



Refer to Section 6, Additional Procedures. 



• Will not read disks 
on internal drive 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Replace drive cable. 

3. Replace Mylar RFI shield. 

4. Replace internal drive. 

5. Verify ROMs on the logic board (refer to Section 6, 
Additional Procedures). 

6. Replace logic board. 



Will not read disks 
on external drive 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Replace drive cable. 

3. Replace Mylar RFI shield. 

4. Replace external drive. 

5. Verify ROMs on the logic board (refer to Section 6, 
Additional Procedures). 

6. Replace logic board. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.5 



Drive Problems 
(continued) 



Solutions 



Audio tone sounds at 
power on, video is 
present but drive 
does not operate 



1. Replace disk drive cable. 

2. Replace disk drive. 

3. Replace main logic board. 



• Disk drive runs 
continuously 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Replace drive cable. 

3. Replace disk drive. 

4. Replace logic board. 



• 400K drive 
will not boot 



1. 



2. 



If the logic board has Rev. A ROMs and the drive 
stepper motor is serial number F518 or higher, 
upgrade to Rev. B ROMs (refer to Section 6, 
Additional Procedures). 
Replace disk drive. 






4.6 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Sep 89 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Peripheral Problems 



Solutions 



Cursor does not move 



1. Connect mouse. 

2. Replace mouse. 

3. Replace logic board. 



• Cursor moves but 1. 

clicking mouse 2. 

produces no response 



Replace mouse. 
Replace logic board. 



No response to any 
key on keyboard 



1. Replace keyboard cable. 

2. Replace keyboard. 

3. Replace logic board. 



No response from 
a particular key 



1. Replace keyswitch. 

2. Replace keyboard. 

3. Replace logic board. 



Known-good 
I mage Writer or 
Image Writer II 
will not print 



1. Replace software with known-good. 

2. Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 
are set correctly. 

3. Replace interface cable. 

4. Replace logic board. 



Known-good 
LaserWriter 
will not print 



1. Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 
are set correctly. 

2. Replace software with known-good. 

3. Refer to Apple Service Technical Procedures: 
Networks. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.7 



Miscellaneous Problems Solutions 



When turned on, the 
Macintosh Plus 
continuously beeps 
and tries to power up 



Replace power/supply board, main logic board, and 
internal drive; then turn on the Macintosh Plus. 
Replacing only the power/sweep board may damage 
the new power/sweep board. 



Clicking or chirping 
sound 



1. Connect logic board cable. 

2. Perform the voltage adjustment (refer to Section 5, 
Adjustments). 

3. Replace power/sweep board. 

4. Replace logic board. 



• Smoke/odor issues 
from the Macintosh 



- Replace power/sweep board. 



No video, no audio 
tone, and no drive 
operation 



1. Connect power cord. 

2. Turn power on. 

3. Replace power cord. 

4. Check fuse. 

5. Replace power/sweep board. 

6. Replace logic board. 



MacTest displays 
128K/512K when 
a 1 megabyte 
Macintosh Plus is 
tested 



Replace Macintosh Plus logic board. 



When the developer's 
switch is installed, the 
Macintosh Plus 
sometimes will reset 
intermittently 



- Remove switch and file it down about 1/16 of an 
inch. 






4.8 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Sep 89 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Miscellaneous Problems 
(continued) 



Solutions 



Macintosh Plus hangs 
on startup 



If the logic board has the ROMs 342-0341-A or B 
(ROM HI) and 342-0342-A (ROM LO) and a 
peripheral device is connected to the SCSI port, the 
peripheral device must be turned on before 
powering on the Macintosh Plus. For additional 
information on ROM versions, refer to Section 6, 
Additional Procedures. 



• Macintosh 5 12K 
enhanced has two 
RFI Shrouds 



Some of these machines have two RFI shrouds 
installed. The two RFI shrouds can be replaced by 
one RFI shroud, which is orderable as a service part. 



Stripped or lost 
Macintosh chassis 
screws 



Refer to Section 6, Additional Procedures. 



• Macintosh Plus boots 
but keyboard 
behaves erratically 



1. Replace keyboard. 

2. Check that logic board grounding clip is not 
touching solder points beneath logic board. 

3. Replace logic board. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Mar 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.9 



m Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh and Macintosh Plus 

Section 5 - Adjustments 



□ CONTENTS 








5.2 


Power/Sweep Voltage Adjustment 




5.2 


Introduction 




5.2 


Materials Required 




5.3 


Voltage Adjustment 




5.5 


Yoke Adjustments 




5.5 


Introduction 




5.5 


Materials Required 




5.5 


Adjustment Procedures 




5.8 


Video Adjustments 




5.8 


Introduction 




5.8 


Materials Required 




5.9 


Adjustment Procedures 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Jul 89 Adjustments / 5.1 



□ POWER/SWEEP VOLTAGE ADJUSTMENT 



Introduction 



i 



The voltages must be verified whenever the logic board 
or the power/sweep board is exchanged. If the 
voltages are outside of the specified tolerances, the 
adjustments must be performed. 

The adjustments are done with the power on, and all 
voltage measurements are taken on the disk drive port 
with no peripheral devices attached. The internal disk 
drive should not be running when the measurements are 
being taken. 

WARNING: Read and follow all the safety precautions in 
Section 1, Basics, before performing any adjustments. 
Failure to follow the safety rules could result in serious 
injury. 



Materials Required 



Macintosh voltage test cable 

Plastic alignment tool 

Digital voltmeter (accurate to within 0.01 volts) 




FIGURE 1 






5.2 / Adjustments 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Voltage 
Adjustment 



1. Switch off computer power and disconnect the AC 
power cord from the back of the computer. 

2. Remove the cover . 

3. Connect the voltage test cable to the external disk 
drive port at the back of the computer. 

Note: The end of the voltage test cable that is not 
connected to the external drive port has four 
colored test leads. You will be using the orange 
and red leads to check computer voltages. 

4. Set up the voltmeter as follows: 

a) Set the voltmeter to the proper voltage range. 

b) Connect the black voltmeter test lead between 
the ground terminal on the voltmeter and the 
computer chassis (ground). 

c) Connect the orange test cable lead (12-volt lead) 
to the voltage input terminal on the voltmeter. 

WARNING: If the banana plugs on the test cable short to 
one another, the Macintosh will be damaged. Make sure 
that the banana plugs are insulated by their rubber hoods 
when not in use. 

5. Connect the AC power cord, switch on computer 
power, and check the voltage reading. 

The voltage reading must be between 11.90 and 
12.75 volts. If the voltage is not within these 
tolerances, use the alignment tool to adjust the 
voltage regulator (Figure 1, #1) on the 
power/sweep board to 12.75 volts. 

6. Switch off computer power. Disconnect the orange 
test lead and replace its insulating hood. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Ju! 89 



Adjustments / 5.3 







FIGURE 2 

7. Connect the red test lead (5-volt lead) to the 
voltage input terminal on the voltmeter, switch on 
computer power, and check the voltage reading. 

The voltage reading must be between 4.85 and 5.15 
volts. If the voltage is not within these tolerances, 
use the alignment tool to adjust the voltage 
regulator (Figure 2, #1) on the power/sweep board 
to the specified limits. 

8. Switch off computer power. Disconnect the red test 
lead and replace its insulating hood. 

9. Repeat steps 4 through 8 to verify that both 
voltages are within the specified tolerances. 

If the power/sweep board cannot be adjusted so that 
both voltages fall within the tolerances indicated 
above, the board should be exchanged. 

10. Disconnect the AC power cord and all test leads 
from the computer. 

11. Replace the cover . 






5.4 / Adjustments 



rev. Jul 89 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ YOKE ADJUSTMENTS 



Introduction 



If you replace the CRT, you will probably need to 
adjust the yoke. To determine if yoke adjustments are 
required, turn the power on and observe the CRT 
screen. If the picture is tilted, perform the tilt 
adjustment. If the picture is off center, perform the 
centering rings adjustment. 



Yoke adjustments are made from the rear of the 
computer. You will need to position a mirror so that 
you can view the front of the computer. Do not try to 
adjust by reaching around the computer; you can't see 
what your hands are going to touch. 

WARNING: Read and follow all the safety precautions in 
Section 1, Basics, before performing adjustments. Failure 
to follow the safety rules could result in serious injury. 



Materials Required 



Small flat-blade screwdriver 
CRT discharge tool 
Soft cloth or foam pad 
Mirror 



Adjustment 
Procedures 



Remove the cover and discharge the CRT to the 
ground lug (refer to Section 2, Take-Apart). 



2. Turn the computer with its back facing you and 

position the mirror so that the CRT screen is visible 
in the mirror. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Jul 89 



Adjustments / 5.5 



Tilt 



Loosen the yoke clamp screw (Figure 3, #1) two or 
three turns. 



4. Connect the power cord to the Macintosh, and then 
connect the other end to an electrical outlet. Turn 
the power on. 

5. Put one hand behind your back and with your other 
hand grasp only the plastic spokes of the yoke 
collar (Figure 3, #2). Rotate the yoke and observe 
the effects on the picture. Rotate the yoke until the 
top and bottom edges of the picture appear parallel 
with the top and bottom edges of the bezel. 

6. Turn the power off and unplug the computer. 
Discharge the CRT to the ground lug. Hold the 
plastic collar in position and carefully tighten the 
yoke clamp screw just enough so that the collar will 
not slip. Do not overtighten. 




FIGURE 3 



5.6 / Adjustments 



rev. Jul 89 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Yoke Centering Ring 



Connect the power cord and turn the power on. 
Locate the two centering rings on the yoke 
assembly (Figure 3, #3). The adjustment of these 
rings determines whether the picture is centered or 
offset to one side. 



8. Rotate each ring about half a turn and observe the 
effect on the screen. 

9. Now center the picture by first holding the front 
ring steady and moving the rear ring, then holding 
the rear ring steady and moving the front ring. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Jul 89 



Adjustments / 5.7 



□ VIDEO ADJUSTMENTS 



Introduction 



Video adjustments must be performed whenever the 
CRT or power supply/sweep board is replaced. 



Materials Required 



Alignment tool 

Mirror 

Ruler 




FIGURE 4 



5.8 / Adjustments 



rev. Nov 89 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Adjustment 
Procedures 



Brightness and Contrast 



1. 



2. 



Put on safety goggles and remove all jewelry, 
including rings and necklaces. 

Turn the contrast control fully clockwise. (The 
contrast control is on the front of the Macintosh, 
the left side, under the Apple logo.) 



on 



3. Adjust the brightness control (Figure 4, #1) with 
the alignment tool: turn it fully counterclockwise 
so that white lines are visible on the screen. Then 
turn it back in the opposite direction until the 
white lines just disappear. 



Size Adjustments 



5. 



Turn the contrast control on the front panel 1/8 of a 
turn counterclockwise. This is the ideal adjustment. 

Use the alignment tool to adjust the width 
(Figure 4, #2) until the picture is approximately 7 
inches wide. 



Focus Adjustment 



6. Use the alignment tool to adjust the height 
(Figure 4, #4) until the picture is approximately 4.7 
inches high. 

7. Turn the focus adjustment (Figure 4, #3) all the way 
clockwise until it doesn't turn any more. Now turn 
it back in the opposite direction (counterclockwise) 
1/8 of a turn. This setting gives the best overall 
sharpness at all points on the screen. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Jul 89 



Adjustments / 5.9 



■4 Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh and Macintosh Plus 

Section 6 - Additional Procedures 



□ CONTENTS 



6.2 Macintosh Plus Kits 

6.2 Things to Remember 

6.3 Disk Drive and Logic Board Kits 

6.4 Macintosh Plus Disk Drive Kit 

6.7 Macintosh Plus Logic Board Kit 

6.8 Special Problems 

6.8 Alternate Chassis Screw Sizes 

6.9 800K Drive Exchange Compatibility 
6.9 800K Disk Ejection Problems 

6.13 Logic Board ROM Upgrade and 400K Drives 

6.14 Macintosh Plus RAM Upgrades 
6.14 Logic Board Configurations 
6.16 ROM Version Compatibility 

6.16 ROM Upgrades for Enhanced Macintosh Systems 

6.16 Replacing 512K Logic Boards 



Note: If a step is underlined, detailed instructions for 
that step can be found in the Take- Apart section. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. May 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.1 



□ MACINTOSH PLUS KITS 



WARNING: Macintosh and Macintosh Plus computers 
contain high voltage and a high-vacuum picture tube. To 
prevent serious personal injury and property damage, be 
sure you read and understand the safety precautions in 
Section 8, CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab 
before you remove the back cover. Failure to follow the 
safety rules could result in serious injury. 



Things to Remember 



When installing the Macintosh Plus Disk Drive Kit 
or the Macintosh Plus Logic Board Kit, pay special 
attention to the following: 



1. Discharge the CRT as specified in Section 1, Take- 
Apart. Failure to do so can result in damage to the 
logic and power/sweep boards. 

2. Follow the ESD prevention rules explained in 
Section 2, Take-Apart. 

3. You may use 400K disks in the 800K drive, but be 
aware that the 800K drive may emit a squealing 
sound. This does not indicate a problem and will 
not cause damage to either the disk or the 800K 
drive. 

4. The shipping instructions must be followed exactly 
as stated on the sheet included with the kit. 

5. The 800K disk drive is shipped with a packing disk 
installed. This packing disk should be given to the 
customer. Whenever the machine is transported, the 
packing disk should be inserted to prevent damage 
to the drive. 

6. Remind your customers that all their disks have to 
be updated with the most recent system files. The 
files are included in the kit and should be given to 
customers. Instructions for performing the system 
file upgrades are given in the manuals that 
accompany the kits. 

7. When the drive kit is installed, the customer should 
be given the Macintosh Plus Internal Drive Manual. 






6.2 / Additional Procedures 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



8. When the drive kit and the logic board kit are 
installed, the customer should be given the 
Peripheral Adapter Cable, the Macintosh Plus 
Owner's Guide, the Macintosh Plus Internal Drive 
Manual and the Macintosh Plus Information Sheet. 

9. The Macintosh Plus displays a gray screen for 5 to 
10 seconds before booting from any disk. (The 
Macintosh Plus is running a self-check.) 

10. The Macintosh Plus Disk Drive Kit is not 
recommended for the 128K Macintosh. 

11. Insert the yellow packing disk into the new 800K 
disk drive to prevent damage during transport. 



Disk Drive 
and Logic 
Board Kits 



If you are installing the Macintosh Plus Disk Drive Kit 
and Logic Board Kit at the same time, follow these steps: 

1. Turn to "Macintosh Plus Disk Drive Kit" and follow 
steps 1-4. 

2. Turn to "Macintosh Plus Logic Board Kit" and follow 
step 5. 

3. Turn back to "Macintosh Plus Disk Drive Kit" and 
follow steps 6-9. 

4. Insert the yellow packing disk into the new 800K 
disk drive. 

5. Return the old ROMs, the 400K drive, and the old 
128K/512K logic board to Apple as instructed in the 
kits. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. May 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.3 



Macintosh Plus 
Disk Drive Kit 



Read "Things to Remember" before beginning. 

The Macintosh Plus Disk Drive Kit contains an 800K 
internal disk drive and two new boot ROMs. When 
installing it, you will replace the 400K internal disk 
drive and two socketed boot ROMs on the 512K 
Macintosh logic board. The new ROMs support both the 
400K and 800K external disk drives. 



Return Information 



The shipping instructions must be followed exactly as 
stated on the sheet included with the Macintosh Plus 
Disk Drive Kit. 



Procedures 



1. Power off the Macintosh and remove the power 
cable from the machine. 



2. Remove the rear housing and RFI shroud. 

3. Discharge the CRT as specified in Section 2, Take- 
Apart. 

WARNING: Make sure the anode has been discharged 
before continuing. Failure to discharge the anode could 
result in serious injury. Also, if you discharge the 
Macintosh CRT to the metal chassis, the logic board may 
be destroyed. You must discharge to the ground lug! 

4. Remove the Macintosh logic board. Using an IC 
extractor, remove the old ROMs installed at 
locations D5 and D8. (Refer to Figure 1, Macintosh 
128K/512K Logic Board.) 

5. Install the two new ROMs in the appropriate 
locations: ROM HI (P/N 342-0341) at location D5, 
ROM LOW (P/N 342-0342) at location D8. (Refer to 
Figure 1, Macintosh 128K/512K Logic Board.) There 
is a notch at one end of each ROM. This notch 
should face the front of the machine. 



6.4 / Additional Procedures 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 






\Msmn i — i j | 

i 5 






68000 
MICROPROCESSOR 



trrrrrrrTrrrrrTTrrrrrrrTrrrrTTTB 



00001 

o o o 

00001 



00000000 

RAM 

00000000 



01 



12 3 4 5 6 




9 10 11 



ROM HI 

Old 342-0220-Aor 

342-0220-B 
New 342-0341 




ROM LOW 

Old 342-0221 -A or 

342-0221 -B 
New 342-0342 



MACINTOSH 128K/512K LOGIC BOARD 

FIGURE 1 

6. Remove the internal disk drive (refer to Section 1, 
Take- Apart). 

7. Reinstall the Macintosh logic board and install the 
new 800K internal disk drive. 

8. Replace the RFI shroud and rear housing. 

9. Run MacTest to verify that the machine is still 
working correctly. 

10. Return the old ROMs and 400K disk drive to Apple 
(refer to instructions included in the kit). 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. May 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.5 



[mens □! 4 
EZ] 




0000 1 

00661 



10000000 

RAM 

J0000Q0 



12 3 4 5 6 



8 9 10 11 



MACINTOSH 128K/512K/512KE LOGIC BOARD 



FIGURE 2 



For128K/512K 

ROM HI 

342-0220 

ROM LOW 

342-0221 



For512KE 
ROM HI 
342-0341 
ROM LOW 
342-0342 



i 



0000 

ooog 

1 ? 3 4 5. 



a LQ LL 



MACINTOSH PLUS 1 MEGABYTE LOGIC BOARD 

FIGURE 3 




ROM HI 

New 342-0341 



ROM LOW 

New 342-0342 






6.6 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Nov 88 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Macintosh Plus 
Logic Board Kit 



Read "Things to Remember" before beginning. 

The Macintosh Plus Logic Board Kit cannot be installed 
unless the Macintosh Plus Disk Drive Kit has been 
installed. You will need the new ROMs which were 
installed for the disk drive kit. The logic board kit 
includes a Macintosh Plus logic board with 1 megabyte 
of memory, an RFI shroud, and a new rear housing. 



Return Information 



The shipping instructions must be followed exactly as 
stated on the sheet included with the Macintosh Plus 
Logic Board Kit. 



Procedures 






1. Power off the Macintosh and remove the power 
cable from the machine. 

2. Remove the old rear housing and RFI shroud. 

3. Discharge the CRT as specified in Section 1, Take- 
Apart. 

WARNING: Make sure the anode has been discharged 
before continuing. Failure to discharge the anode 
could result in serious injury. Also, if you discharge 
the Macintosh CRT to the metal chassis, the logic board 
may be destroyed. You must discharge to the 
ground lug! 

4. Remove the 128K/512K Macintosh logic board. 
Using an IC extractor, remove the two Revision D 
ROMs. ROM HI is at location D5, and ROM LOW is 
at location D8. (Refer to Figure 2, Macintosh 
128K/512K Logic Board.) 

5. Install the two ROMs in the appropriate locations 
on the new logic board: ROM HI (P/N 342-0341) at 
location D5, ROM LOW (P/N 342-034£) at location 
D8. (Refer to Figure 3, Macintosh Plus 1 Megabyte 
Logic Board.) There is a notch at one end of each 
ROM. This notch should face the front of the 
machine on installation. 

6. Install the new Macintosh logic board with the 
ROMs. Install the new RFI shroud and the new rear 
housing. 

7. Run MacTest to verify that the machine is still 
working correctly. 

8. Return the old logic board (with no ROMs), the old 
RFI shroud, and the old rear housing to Apple. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. May 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.7 



□ SPECIAL PROBLEMS 



Alternate 
Chassis 
Screw Sizes 



i 



Some Macintosh systems have been shipped with non- 
standard chassis screws. The standard Macintosh uses 
three 2.9 x 10 mm screws to attach the power/sweep 
board to the chassis, and one 2.9 x 6 mm screw to attach 
the ground lug to the chassis. The non-standard systems 
use one of the following types of screw for both the 
board and the ground lug: 



• #6 x 3/8" Type A sheet metal screw, Phillips pan 
head, with external tooth start washer attached, 
steel, with zinc or cad plating 

• #4-40 x 3/8" machine screw 

To determine which screw is needed, compare the 
screw holes with the figures below. Systems with pern 
nuts or nutserts (Figures 4 and 5) use the machine 
screw. Systems without them (Figure 6) use the sheet 
metal screw. 

These screws are available at any hardware store. 



WASHER 



CHASSIS 



"YS 



PEM NUT 



FIGURE 4 



WASHER 



CHASSIS 



■^ 



NUTSERTS 



FIGURE 5 



WASHER 



CHASSIS 



FIGURE 6 



' 



6.8 / Additional Procedures 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



800K Drive 

Exchange 

Compatibility 



There are three series of 800K drive mechanisms. 
All three mechanisms can be used as an internal drive, 
but only with the cable specified below. If you do not 
use the correct cable, the drive will not work 
correctly. 



Series Number 



Cable Needed 



800K Disk 

Ejection 

Problems 



MFD-51W-03 (Red on Silver Label) Yellow 
MFD-51W (Black on Silver Label) Red 

51W-10 (Black on Silver Label) Red 

For additional information refer to the Disk Drives tab. 



Whenever a disk from an internal or external 800K 
drive does not fully eject, the user must push the disk 
back in and attempt to eject it electronically. 

WARNING: If the disk becomes "frozen " and does not 
fully eject, the user must not force the disk by pulling it out 
from the drive. Using force may result in damage to the 
mechanism. 

The following three ways of ejecting the disk should 
be tried: 

1. Hold down the < Shift > and < Command > keys and 
press 1 (for the internal drive) or 2 (for the 
external drive). 

2. Pull down the File menu and select Eject. Attempt 
this two or three times. 

3. As a last resort, insert a paper clip in the pin hole 
located beneath and to the right of the slot where 
the disk is inserted. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. May 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.9 



The following factors can also affect the insertion and 
ejection of a disk: 

• A disk should be inserted by pressing the disk 
gently into the drive. Avoid grasping and pushing 
the disk, as this may cause the disk to go in only 
part way and stop. If this happens, the user should 
attempt to eject the disk as described above. 

• Disks with three or more labels may not slide 
easily into and out of the disk slot in the Macintosh 
case. 

Technicians should also be careful when removing or 
installing a disk drive mechanism. If the disk opening 
in the disk drive mechanism is not properly centered, 
binding or friction may cause ejection problems. If the 
internal mounting bracket is warped or bent, the drive 
will not align properly with the bezel and the mounting 
bracket will need to be exchanged. Refer to Section 2, 
Take-Apart, for the proper installation procedure. 






Left 
Side 




FRONT VIEW 



FIGURE 7 




FIGURE 8 






6.10 / Additional Procedures 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Removing 
Disks That 
Will Not Eject 



If a disk becomes "jammed" in a customer's disk 
drive, use the following procedure to remove it 
before you return the disk drive. 

1. Remove the disk drive (refer to Section 2, Take- 
Apart). 

2. Place the disk drive and RFI shield assembly upside 
down on a flat surface. 

3. Remove the four screws securing the disk drive 
mechanism to the RFI shield. 

4. Remove the disk drive mechanism from the RFI 
shield. 

5. Place the disk drive mechanism on a flat surface, 
with the printed circuit board facing down and the 
disk opening facing you (Figure 7). 

If the disk is not already fully inserted into the 
disk drive, push it in until it is properly seated. 

6. Press the eject lever at the right side of the disk 
drive (Figure 7, #1). 

Turn the disk drive so that the left side is facing 
you. 

7. Locate the small arm with a cylindrical cog at its 
end. This arm is located near the left-to-right 
center of the drive mechanism (Figure 8, #1). The 
cog will be caught in the half-moon depression of 
the disk case. 



8. Insert a small screwdriver at the position shown in 
Figure 8, #2, and gently move the arm away from 
the disk until the disk pops forward slightly. 
Remove the disk from the disk drive. 

9. Return the defective disk drive to Apple and follow 
the instructions in Section 2, Take-Apart, to align 
the new disk drive with the front bezel. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. May 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.11 




68000 
MICROPROCESSOR 



TTTTTTTTT7TTTT7TTTTTTTTTTTTTTT7T 



nnnni 

Ltf Lsr L*F i_±f I 

o o <=> 

0000 



00000000 
0000 



RAM 



! ii II If] 

o o o 

000 



12 3 4 5 



8 9 10 11 



ROM HI 

342-0220-B 



i 



ROM LOW 

342-0221 -B 



FIGURE 9 



6.12 / Additional Procedures 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Logic Board 
ROM Upgrade and 
400K Drives 



Current 400K disk drives contain a new stepper motor, 
which may require the replacement of the two boot 
ROMs on older Macintosh logic boards (both 128K and 
512K). Both of these ROMs are socketed. The new 
ROMs are compatible with both the new and old 
stepper motors. 

The 128K/512K Macintosh should have ROM HI 342- 
0220-B at location D5, and ROM LOW 342-0221-B at 
location D8. If these ROMs are not installed, you need 
to upgrade the logic board by replacing the boot ROMs. 



Installation 
Procedures 



1. Power off the Macintosh and remove the power 
cable from the machine. 



2. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT (refer to 
Section 2, Take- Apart). 

WARNING: Make sure the anode has been discharged 
before continuing. Failure to discharge the anode could 
result in serious injury. Also, if you discharge the 
Macintosh CRT to the metal chassis, the logic board may 
be destroyed. You must discharge to the ground lug! 

3. Remove the Macintosh logic board. Referring to 
Figure 9, locate the two ROMs and verify that the 
old ROMs are installed. 

4. Using an IC extractor, remove the ROMs and place 
them on a piece of antistatic foam. 

5. Install the new ROMs in the appropriate location 
[ROM HI (P/N 342-0220-B) at location D5, ROM 
LOW (P/N 342-0221-B) at location D8]. There is a 
notch at one end of each ROM. This notch should 
face the front of the machine on installation. 

6. Reinstall the Macintosh logic board. 

7. Replace the back cover. 

8. Run MacTest to verify that the machine is still 
working correctly. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. May 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.13 



□ MACINTOSH PLUS RAM UPGRADES 



Introduction 



The Macintosh Plus may be configured in three ways: 
1 MB (which is standard) and 2.5 MB or 4 MB (which 
are both upgrades or expansions). The expansions must 
follow strict guidelines that involve modifying the 
Macintosh logic board and installing the SIMMs. 



i 



Note: For installation purposes, the SIMMs are labeled 
Bank A (Figure 10, #3) and Bank B (Figure 10, #4). 
Each bank or row is composed of two slots, and both 
slots must have a SIMM installed. 

Note: When removing SIMMs from the logic board, use 
the SIMM removal tool. See You Oughta Know. 



Logic Board 
Configurations 



There are two resistors, located on the upper-left side 
of the logic board, that give the Macintosh important 
information about the size of the installed SIMMs. 



If you have more than one bank of SIMMs installed, 
the ONE ROW, R9 (Figure 10, #1) resistor should 
be cut out using insulated wire cutters. 

If you have 256K SIMMs in both Bank A (Figure 10, 
#3) and Bank B (Figure 10, #4), the resistor marked 
256K BIT, R8 (Figure 10, #2) must be installed. 

If either bank has 1 MB SIMMs, resistor R8 (256K 
bit) must be removed. 




FIGURE 10 






6.14 / Additional Procedures 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



The following chart summarizes the various SIMM 
configurations that the Macintosh Plus and the system 
software support. 

RAM Bank A (Figure 11 #1) Bank B (Figure 11 #2) 

1 MB Two 256K SIMMs Two 256K SIMMs 

2.5 MB Two 1 MB SIMMs Two 256K SIMMs 

4 MB Two 1 MB SIMMs Two 1 MB SIMMs 

IMPORTANT: Other configurations, such as a single 
SIMM or a pair of differently sized SIMMs, will not function 
correctly. __ 

Note: For further information on the SIMMs currently 
available for the Macintosh Plus, see the standalone 
chart titled "# Quick Reference: SIMM Compatibility." 



The following chart summarizes the amount of RAM 
installed in various resistor configurations. 



RAM 

1 MB 
2.5 MB 
4 MB 



256K BIT (R8^ 

Present 

Removed 

Removed 



ONE ROW (R9) 

Removed 
Removed 
Removed 





rn ~^i 



ros 






rff^ 



301 



rns 



oni 



DDO 

ID n 



FIGURE 11 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. May 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.15 



□ ROM VERSION COMPATIBILITY 



ROM Upgrades 
for Enhanced 
Macintosh Systems 



i 



Since March, 1987, the Macintosh 512K enhanced 
system, the Macintosh Plus, and the 800K disk drive 
upgrade kit have been shipped with a new set of high- 
boot and low-boot ROMs. These ROMs correct SCSI 
device problems that were being experienced with 
older ROMs. The new ROMs are fully compatible with 
512K systems, but you must not mix old and new ROMs. 

The following list gives the part number and the 
version letter of the old and new ROMs. 



Old ROMs 



New ROMs 



High Boot: 



342-0341-A 
342-0341-B 



342-0341-C 



Low Boot- 342-0342-A 



342-0342-B 



Replacing 51 2K 
Logic Boards 



The 512K logic board (P/N 661-96236) is shipped with 
a high-boot ROM (P/N 342-0220) and a low-boot ROM 
(P/N 342-0221) that support only the 400K disk drive. 
When the 512K logic board is used to replace a 
defective 512K enhanced system logic board, or a 
defective 512K system logic board with a 800K disk 
drive, you must replace its ROMs with ROMs from the 
customer's logic board. The customer's ROMs, which 
support 800K disk drive systems, have part numbers 
342-0341 (high-boot ROM) and 342-0342 (low-boot 
ROM). 






6.16 / Additional Procedures 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



Materials Required 



Rubbing Alcohol 
X-acto knife 
Mylar washers (4) 

Rags or paper towels for cleaning up 
Small stiff brush (a very stiff toothbrush or a cut-off 
acid brush works best) 

WARNING: There is high voltage and a high-vacuum 
picture tube inside the Macintosh computer. To prevent 
personal injury and property damage, make sure you have 
read the safety information in Section 1, Basics, before 
you perform this procedure. 



Procedure 



1. Put on safety goggles and remove the CRT (refer to 
Section 2, Take-Apart). Make sure the CRT has been 
discharged and the anode wire removed before 
going on to step 2. 

2. Place the CRT face down on a workbench so that 
you are viewing the area shown in Figure 10. 

3. Inspect the area around the bottom of the metal band 
that goes around the CRT. If the CRT has any 
adhesive tape extending out from under the band 
(Figure 10, #1), hold the CRT steady with one hand 
(be careful not to touch the anode) and use an X-acto 
knife to cut the tape back to the edge of the band. 
Cut away the tape on all sides of the CRT. If there 
is no tape extending out, go on to the next step. 

4. Check along the bottom edge of the band for any 
overspray of the conductive spray (Figure 10, #2). 
Scrub the glass along the edge of the band with a 
brush that has been dipped in rubbing alcohol. 

5. Now check your work: the area below the edge of 
the band should be shiny like the glass on the 
screen of the CRT. Any dull or dark-looking areas 
should be scrubbed again. 



...Continued on next page 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Feb 87 



Additional Procedures / 6.17 



6. With the bezel face down, apply a mylar washer to 
each of the four CRT mounting holes on the bezel 
(Figure 11, #1). Each washer should be centered 
with its center hole matching the screw hole in the 
bezel. 

7. Make sure that the face of the CRT is clean, and 
then carefully seat the CRT on the bezel and install 
the CRT mounting screws. 

8. Connect the anode wire to the CRT and replace the 
cover. 




FIGURE 11 






6.18 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ ROM VERSION COMPATIBILITY 



ROM Upgrades 
for Enhanced 
Macintosh Systems 



Since March, 1987, the Macintosh 512K enhanced 
system, the Macintosh Plus, and the 800K disk drive 
upgrade kit have been shipped with a new set of high- 
boot and low-boot ROMs. These ROMs correct SCSI 
device problems that were being experienced with 
older ROMs. The new ROMs are fully compatible with 
512K systems, but you must not mix old and new ROMs. 

The following list gives the part number and the 
version letter of the old and new ROMs. 



High Boot: 



Old ROMs 

342-0341-A 
342-0341-B 



New ROMs 

342-0341-C 



Low Boot: 



342-0342-A 



342-0342-B 



Replacing 51 2K 
Logic Boards 



The 512K logic board (P/N 661-96236) is shipped with 
a high-boot ROM (P/N 342-0220) and a low-boot ROM 
(P/N 342-0221) that support only the 400K disk drive. 
When the 512K logic board is used to replace a 
defective 512K enhanced system logic board, or a 
defective 512K system logic board with a 800K disk 
drive, you must replace its ROMs with ROMs from the 
customer's logic board. The customer's ROMs, which 
will support 800K disk drive systems, will have part 
numbers 342-0341 (high-boot ROM) and 342-0342 (low- 
boot ROM). 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Sep 88 



Additional Procedures / 6.19 



□ CRT DISCHARGE TOOL VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



The CRT discharge tool does not cause a spark or a 
crackle. You may verify that the CRT discharge tool did 
its job with the following procedure. If you receive a 
spark or crackle when performing this procedure, the 
CRT discharge tool is defective and needs to be 
replaced. 

WARNING: Do not perform this procedure until you have 
discharged the anode using the CRT discharge tool. 



! 



Materials Required 



Lead with alligator clips on each end 
Flatblade screwdriver with insulated handle 



WARNING: Discharge the anode to the metal part of the 
ground lug. Failure to do so will damage the logic and 
power/sweep boards 

1. Remove any jewelry (rings, bracelets, necklaces, 
watches, etc.) and your grounding wriststrap and set 
them aside. Put on safety goggles. 

2. Attach one alligator clip to the large flatblade 
screwdriver and the other to the metal part of the 
ground lug on the CRT. 

3. Put one hand in your pocket or behind your back 
and grasp the insulated handle of the screwdriver 
with your other hand (without touching the metal). 

4. Hold the screwdriver parallel to the tube surface 
and insert it under the anode cap until it touches 
the anode ring. Do not use force. 



6. 



Remove the screwdriver from under the anode cap. 
To be sure the CRT is discharged, repeat step 4. 

Remove the alligator clip from the ground lug. Set 
the tool aside where it will be out of the way. 



Note: The anode can build up voltage over a period 
of time. To drain off any residual charges, establish 
an ongoing ground by fastening one end of an 
alligator lead to the ground lug and the other end to 
the anode aperture. 






6.20 / Additional Procedures 



Jul 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ MACINTOSH PLUS RAM UPGRADES 



Introduction 



The Macintosh Plus may be configured in three ways: 
1M (which is standard) and 2.5M or 4M (which are both 
upgrades or expansions). The expansions must follow 
strict guidelines that involve modifying the Macintosh 
logic board and installing the SIMMs. 



Note: For installation purposes, the SIMMs are 
labeled Bank A (Figure 12, #3) and Bank B (Figure 
12, #4). Each bank or row is composed of two slots, 
and both slots must have a SIMM installed. 

Note: When removing SIMMs from the logic board, 
use the SIMM removal tool. See You Oughta Know. 



Logic Board 
Configurations 



There are two resistors, located on the upper-left side 
of the logic board, that give the Macintosh important 
information about the size of the installed SIMMs. 



If you have more than one bank of SIMMs installed, 
the ONE ROW, R9 (Figure 12, #1) resistor should 
be cut out using insulated wire cutters. 

If you have 25 6K SIMMs in both group A (Figure 12, 
#3) and group B (Figure 12, #4), the resistor 
marked 256K BIT, R8 (Figure 12, #2) must be 
installed. 

If either bank has 1M SIMMs, resistor R8 (256K bit) 
must be removed. 




FIGURE 12 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Jul 89 



Additional Procedures / 6.21 



The following chart summarizes the various SIMM 
configurations that the Macintosh Plus and the system 
software will support. 

RAM Bank A (Figure 13 #1) Bank B (Figure 13 #2^ 

1M Two 256K SIMMs Two 256K SIMMs 

2.5M Two 1M SIMMs 

4M Two 1M SIMMs 



Two 256K SIMMs 
Two 1M SIMMs 



The following chart summarizes the amount of RAM 
installed in various resistor configurations. 



RAM 2S6KBIT(R8^ 

1M Present 

2.5M Removed 

4M Removed 



QNE RQW (R9) 

Removed 
Removed 
Removed 



i 



IMPORTANT: Other configurations, such as a single 
SIMM or a pair of differently sized SIMMs, will not function 
correctly. 




FIGURE 13 



6.22 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Oct 88 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 






SIMM 
Identification 



The SIMMs are available with two sizes of RAM — 1 MB 
and 256K — and come in several configurations that can 
be used interchangeably. 



CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to damage from 
ESP and skin acid. Handle only by the edges! 



Speed 



The Macintosh and Macintosh Plus require 150 ns (or 
faster) SIMMs. The RAM speed is usually indicated by 
the -xx number after the manufacturer's part number. 
For example, -15 indicates 150 ns SIMMs and -12 
indicates 120 ns SIMMs. 



1 MB SIMMs 



The 1 MB SOJ (Single Out-line JLead) SIMM (Figure 14) 
contains eight surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has ten pins 
(or legs) on each of two sides. 



°0QDDDDDD° 

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 



FIGURE 14 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Jan 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.23 



256K SIMMs 



The 256K SIMMs come in four configurations: 

• 256K SOJ SIMM (Figure 15, #1) 

The 256K SOJ (Single Out-line JLead) SIMM contains 
two surface-mounted ICs, each with ten pins (or legs) 
on each of two sides. 



i 



256K DIP SIMM (Figure 15, #2) 
The 256K DIP (Dual In-line Package) SIMM contains 
two ICs mounted through the printed circuit board. 
Each 1C has ten pins (or legs) on each of two sides. 

256K PLCC SIMM (Figure 15, #3) 
The 256K PLCC (Plastic Leaded Contact Chip) SIMM 
contains eight surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has five 
pins (or legs) on each of two sides and four pins on 
each of the other two sides. 

256K DIP SIMM (Figure 15, #4) 

This DIP SIMM contains eight ICs. Each IC has 

eight pins (or legs) on each of two sides. 



, nnnnn nnnnn. 



.nnnnn nnnnn. 



l uuaua — uuuuu ' ' uuuuu — uuuuu ' 

nnn nnn nn n nnn nnnnnnnnnnnnn n nnnn 




1 



.nnnnnnnnnn. 



° E I t> I ° 

'uuuuuuuuuu' 'uuuuuuuuuu' 

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 




o! 




n n n nn nnnnn nn nn n n nn nn n nn nnnnnnn 




n nnn n nnnnnnnnnnnnn n nnn n nnnnnnn 



FIGURE 15 






6.24 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Pius 






□ CHASSIS REPLACEMENT 



Not all Macintosh chassis are designed the same. 
However, if you ever need to replace one, the chassis 
replacement procedure that follows can be used to 
replace any Macintosh or Macintosh Plus chassis. 



Materials Required 



CRT discharge tool 

Pull-apart tool 

15-inch Torx screwdriver 

Safety goggles 

Small flatblade screwdriver 

Soft cloth or foam pad 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT to the 
ground lug . 

WARNING: Make sure the anode has been discharged 
before continuing. Failure to discharge the anode could 
result in serious injury. 

2. Remove the power/sweep board . 

3. Remove the main logic board . 

4. Remove the internal disk drive . 

5. With the computer face down on a foam pad or soft 
cloth, remove the five torx screws that secure the 
chassis to the front bezel, and lift out the chassis. 



Replace 






1. Position the replacement chassis on the front bezel, 
and install the five torx screws. 

2. Replace the internal disk drive . 

3. Replace the main logic board . 

4. Replace the power/sweep board. 

5. Perform the voltage adjustment (refer to Section 5, 
Adjustments). 

6. Replace the cover (be sure the insulating paper is 
installed). 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Oct 88 



Additional Procedures / 6.25 



* Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh and Macintosh Plus 

Section 7 - Illustrated Parts List 



□ CONTENTS 



7.3 Macintosh External Housing (Figure 1) 
7.5 Macintosh Plus Chassis & Power Supply 

(Figure 2) 
7.7 Macintosh Exploded View (Figure 3) 
7.9 Macintosh Keyboard Assembly (Figure 4) 
7.11 Macintosh Numeric Keypad Assembly (Figure 5) 
7.13 Macintosh Plus Rear Housing (Figure 6) 
7.15 Macintosh Plus — Exploded View (Figure 7) 
7.17 Macintosh Plus Keyboard Assembly (Figure 8) 
7.19 Service Packaging, 800K/1.4 MB Drives 

(Figure 9) 



The figures and lists in this section include all piece 
parts that can be purchased separately from Apple for 
the Macintosh, along with their part numbers. These 
are the only parts available from Apple. Refer to your 
Apple Service Programs manual for prices. 



Note: Only items unique to the Macintosh Plus are 
called out on Figures 6, 7, and 8. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Oct 88 Illustrated Parts List / 7.1 







7.2 / Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Apr 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 









□ MACINTOSH EXTERNAL HOUSING (Figure 1) 
Item Part No. Description 



1 


630-5139 


2 


742-0003 


3 


426-1007 


4 


815-0737 




815-0763 


5 


815-0938 




815-0971 


6 


825-4018 




825-1014 


7 


825-0742 




825-1065 


8 


825-0613 


9 


435-5002 


10 


590-0138 




590-0131 


11 


865-0051 


12 


825-0547 


13 


661-96155 




661-0400 


14 


699-8001 


15 


815-0409 



Rear Housing with Label 

Battery, Alkaline, 4.5 V 

Screw, Tap, M 4.22 x 1.41 x 16, Torx, Zinc 

Reset/Interrupt Switch, Beige 

Reset/Interrupt Switch, Smoke 

Macintosh Battery Door, Beige 

Macintosh Plus Battery Door, Platinum 

Agency Approval Label 

Agency Approval Label, 512K Enhanced 

Macintosh Label 

Macintosh Signature 512K Label 

Logo Label (Housing) 

Screw, Tap, 8-32 x .625 Fill, Torx, Black Zinc Oxide 

Power Cable, Beige 

Power Cable, Smoke 

Macintosh Foot 

Logo Label (Bezel) 

Macintosh Mouse 

Apple Mouse, Platinum 

Rubber-Coated Mouseball 

Mouseball Retainer 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Nov 89 Illustrated Parts List / 7.3 




UJ 






7.4 / Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Apr 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ MACINTOSH / MACINTOSH PLUS— CHASSIS AND POWER 
SUPPLY (Figure 2) 



item 


Part No. 


Description 


1 


661-0461 


Power Supply, Beige 




661-0462 


Power Supply, Platinum 




661-76214 


Power Sweep Board, 220 V 


2 


470-2101 


Screw, 2.9 x 10 mm 


3 


805-0576 


Lower Ground Clip 


4 


805-0766 


Macintosh Chassis 


5 


490-0002 


Screw, Tap, 6-32 x .375 (Chassis Grounding) 


6 


865-0029 


Brightness Knob, Smoke 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Nov 89 Illustrated Parts List / 7.5 




I 



7.6 /Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Apr 89 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ MACINTOSH— EXPLODED VIEW (Figure 3) 



Item Part No. 



l 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 

7 
8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 



805-0765 

805-0217 

661-76156 

661-0345 

590-0167 

590-0437 

725-0011 

590-0184 

740-0300 

740-0060 

426-1001 

661-96152 

661-96236 

805-0577 

661-0221 

661-0220 

462-3100 

590-0160 

725-0018 

810-0373 

076-0103 



Description 

Shield for Internal Drive 

Shield for Internal 800K Drive (512K enhanced) 

400K Mechanism, Apple 3.5 Drive 

800K Mechanism, Apple 3.5 Drive (512K enhanced) 

Cable, Internal 3.5-inch Drive (red striped) 

Cable, Internal 3.5-inch Drive (yellow striped) 

Insulator Shield (back of power supply) 

Power-Supply-to-Logic-Board Cable 

U.S. Power Supply Fuse, 2.5 A 250 V 

Int'l Power Supply Fuse, 1.6 A 250 V 

Screw, Tap, M 4.22 x 1.41 x 13 (CRT and chassis) 

128K Main Logic Board* 

512K Logic Board* 

RFI Shroud 

ROM, Low, Macintosh with 400K Floppy** 

ROM, High, Macintosh with 400K Floppy** 

Screw, M 3 x .5 x 6 

CRT Socket Cable 

Mylar Washer 

Front Bezel 

CRT and Yoke Assembly 



* If the logic board fails, refer to Section 6, Additional 
Procedures, for instructions. 



**These ROMs are used on 128K logic boards and on 
512K logic boards that have not been upgraded with 
ROMs that support the 800K Disk Drive. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



rev. Oct 90 



Illustrated Parts List / 7.7 






7.8 / Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ MACINTOSH— KEYBOARD ASSEMBLY (Figure 4) 
Item Part No. Description 

Keyboard, Beige (replacing part number 661-96154) 

Keycap Set 

Keyboard Top Case 

Keyboard Bottom Case 

Screw, Tap 2.20 x 6.25 (Keyboard Case) 

Alps Long-Stem Keyswitch, Macintosh/ 

Macintosh Plus* 
Keyboard/Keypad Cable, Beige 
Keyboard/Keypad Cable, Smoke 
Alps Alpha Lock Keyswitch, Macintosh/ 

Macintosh Plus* 



Note: Keycaps are not available for international 
keyboards. For Macintosh Plus keycap set, see 
Figure 8, "Macintosh Plus Keyboard Assembly." 

*Refer to keyswitch identification in Appendix section. 



1 


661-0322 


2 


658-7039 


3 


815-0728 


4 


815-0754 


5 


430-1025 


6 


705-0070 


7 


590-0144 




590-0170 


8 


705-0077 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Nov 89 Illustrated Parts List / 7.9 




If) 

UJ 

ce 

3 

o 



i 



> 



7.10 /Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ MACINTOSH - NUMERIC KEYPAD ASSEMBLY (Figure 5) 

item Part No. Description 

1 658-4045 Keypad Assembly 

2 865-0051 Macintosh Foot 

3 430-1025 Screw, Tap, 2.2 x 6.25 



Note: The keyswitch used on the Macintosh Numeric 
Keypad is the same as that on the Macintosh Keyboard: 
Alps Longstem Keyswitch (p/n 705-0070). See 
Appendix A for illustration. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Apr 87 Illustrated Parts List / 7.1 1 








LjJ 

q: 
z> 



7.12 /Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ MACINTOSH PLUS - REAR HOUSING (Figure 6) 

Item Part No. Description 

1 630-5211 Rear Housing, Beige 
630-5235 Rear Housing, Platinum 

2 815-0938 Battery Door, Beige 
815-0971 Battery Door, Platinum 

3 825-1254 Agency Approval Label, Beige 
825-1345 Agency Approval Label, Platinum 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Aug 87 Illustrated Parts List / 7.13 




FIGURE 7 






7.14/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Oct 90 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 






□ MACINTOSH PLUS— EXPLODED VIEW (Figure 7) 

Item Part No. Description 

1 805-0217 Shield for Internal Drive 

2 661-0345 Drive Mechanism, 800K 

3 590-0167 Cable, Internal 3.5-inch Drive (red stripe) 
590-0437 Cable, Internal 3.5-inch Drive (yellow stripe) 

4 661-0525 Logic Board (without RAM; replaces part number 

661-0321) 

5 661-0402 SIMM, 256K, 120 ns 
661-0403 SIMM, 1 MB, 120 ns 
661-0494 SIMM, DIP, 256K, 120 ns 

6 101-4151 Resistor, 150 Ohms, 1/4 W, ±5% 

7 805-5047 RFI Shroud 

8 661-0633 ROM, Low 

9 661-0632 ROM, High 

10 003-0003 Packing Disk, 2-sided (for transporting) 

11 462-3401 Screw, M 3 x 6, with two washers 

12 805-5050 Shipping Fixture, 1.4 MB Drive Mechanism 

13 805-0910 Ground Clip 

14 825-1256 Logo Plate Label 

15 810-0379 Front Bezel 



Macintosh / Macintosh Pius rev. Oct 90 Illustrated Parts List / 7.15 



I 





* It ♦ i| 

I 
j l jU ( in |M* I 

[IDLE. 



00 

bJ 
QC 






7.16 / Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Feb 87 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 






□ MACINTOSH PLUS - KEYBOARD ASSEMBLY (Figure 8) 

Item Part No, Description 

1 66 1-0322 Macintosh Plus Keyboard, Beige (with cable) 
66l-04l6 Macintosh Plus Keyboard, Platinum (with cable) 
C661-0416 Macintosh Plus Keyboard, Platinum, French Canadian 
D661-0416 Macintosh Plus Keyboard, Platinum, German 

E66 1-0416 Macintosh Plus Keyboard, Platinum, Spanish 

F661-0416 Macintosh Plus Keyboard, Platinum, French 

T661-0416 Macintosh Plus Keyboard, Platinum, Italian 

2 815-0936 Top Cover, Macintosh Plus K/B, Beige 
815-0983 Top Cover, Macintosh Plus K/B, Platinum 

3 815-0937 Bottom Cover, Macintosh Plus K/B, Beige 
815-0984 Bottom Cover, Macintosh Plus K/B, Platinum 

4 658-5186 r Macintosh Plus Keycap Set, Beige 
658-5190 Macintosh Plus Keycap Set, Smoke 

5 705-0104 Mitsumi Keyswitch* 

705-0070 Alps Long-Stem Keyswitch, Macintosh/ 

Macintosh Plus* 

6 705-0044 Mitsumi Locking Keyswitch* 
705-0077 Alps Alpha Lock Keyswitch, Macintosh/ 

Macintosh Plus* 

*Refer to keyswitch identification in Basics section. 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus rev. Feb 89 Illustrated Parts List / 7.1 7 



I 




FIGURE 9 






7.18 /Illustrated Parts List 



Oct 88 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus 



□ SERVICE PACKAGING, 800K/1.4 MB DRIVES (Figure 9) 

Item Part No. Description 

602-0210 Service Packaging, 800K/1.4 MB Drives 



Macintosh / Macintosh Plus Oct 88 Illustrated Parts List / 7.1 9 



« Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 



Technical Procedures 



□ TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Section 1 - 


1.2 


Product Description 


Basics 


1.2 


Macintosh SE Features 




1.3 


Macintosh SE/30 Features 




1.6 


FDHD Disk Drive 




1.7 


Connector Identification 




1.10 


Internal Expansion Connectors 




1.11 


Theory of Operation 




1.11 


Introduction 




1.11 


Main Logic Board 




1.14 


Power Supply 




1.14 


Analog Board 




1.14 


CRT and Video Board 




1.15 


Disk Drive(s) 




1.15 


SCSI Hard Disk 




1.15 


Apple Desktop Bus Keyboard and Mouse 




1.16 


Care and Handling 


Section 2 - 


2.2 


Cover 


Take-Apart 


2.5 


Discharging the Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.5 


Discharge Procedure 




2.7 


Anode Cap 




2.8 


Analog Board and Power Supply 




2.14 


Main Logic Board 




2.16 


Identifying Macintosh SE Logic Boards 




2.22 


SIMMs 




2.25 


Video Board 




2.28 


Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.31 


Internal SCSI Hard Disk Drive 




2.31 


Identifying 20SC Revision A and B Drives 




2.33 


Upper Internal Disk Drive 




2.36 


Lower Internal Disk Drive 




2.38 


Fan Assembly 




2.42 


Speaker, Front Bezel, and Slot Cover 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Nov 90 



Contents / i 



Section 3 - 


3.2 


Adjustments 


3.2 




3.2 




3.3 




3.3 




3.4 




3.4 




3.4 




3.5 


Section 4 - 


4.2 


Diagnostics 


4.2 




4.3 




4.4 




4.4 




4.6 




4.6 




4.6 




4.8 




4.9 




4.14 




4.16 




4.17 




4.17 




4.17 




4.20 




4.22 




4.26 




4.28 




4.29 




4.29 




4.30 


Section 5 - 


5.3 


Troubleshooting 


5.3 




5.3 




5.3 




5.4 




5.4 




5.6 




5.7 




5.8 




5.9 




5.10 




5.12 




5.12 




5.12 




5.12 



Yoke Adjustments 

Introduction 

Materials Required 

Tilt Adjustment 

Centering Ring Adjustment 
Video Adjustments 

Introduction 

Materials Required 

Adjustment Procedures 



Introduction to MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 

Program Similarities 

Program Differences 
Making Backup Disks 

Copying MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 Disks 
Running MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 

Materials Required 

Starting MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 

Installing the Loopbacks 

Using the MacTest SE and SE/30 Menus 

Running the Tests 
Introduction to AppleCAT SE and AppleCAT SE/30 
Running AppleCAT SE and AppleCAT SE/30 

Materials Required 

Setting Up Test Station and UUT 

Establishing Communication 

Using the AppleCAT Menus 

Running the Tests 

Repair Confirmation Codes 
SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure 

To Determine If a Jumper Is Needed 

To Install the Jumper 



Introduction 

General Information 

How to Use the Symptom Chart 

Things to Remember 
Symptom Chart 

Video Problems 

Peripheral Problems 

Drive Problems 

SCSI Problems 

Miscellaneous Problems 
Isolating a Faulty Macintosh SE SIMM 
Battery Verification 

Introduction 

Materials Required 

Verification Procedure 






ii / Contents 



rev. Nov 90 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Section 6 - 

Additional 

Procedures 



6.3 Battery Replacement 

6.3 Introduction 

6A Battery Identification 

6.5 Replacing Soldered Batteries (SE only) 

6.7 Replacing Batteries in Battery Holders 

6.8 SIMM Identification 
6.8 Speed 

6.8 1 MB SIMMs 

6.9 256K SIMMs 

6.10 Macintosh SE SIMM Upgrades 

6.10 RAM Configurations 

6.11 SIMM Arrangements 

6.12 Logic Board Identification 

6.14 Solder-Type Logic Board 

6.15 Solder-Type Upgrades 

6.17 Jumper-Type Logic Board 

6.18 Jumper-Type Upgrades 

6.20 Macintosh SE/30 SIMM Upgrades 

6.20 RAM Configurations 

6.20 SIMM Arrangements 

6.21 SIMM Upgrades 

6.24 Macintosh SE Chassis Tab Modification 

6.24 Introduction 

6.24 Modification Procedure 

6.25 Chassis Assembly 
6.25 Introduction 

6.25 Assembly Procedure 

6.26 Macintosh SE/30 Logic Board Upgrade 
6.26 Introduction 

6.26 Installation 

6.29 FDHD Upgrade for the Macintosh SE 

6.29 Introduction 

6.29 Materials Required 

6.29 Upgrade Procedure 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Nov 90 



Contents / iii 



Section 7 - 


This 


SE-Bus PC Card 




Illustrated 


IPL.3 


Parts List 


IPL.5 




IPL.7 




IPL.9 




IPL.ll 




IPL.13 




IPL.15 




IPL.17 




IPL.17 




IPL.19 



This section has moved to Macintosh Family Cards. 



Internal View (Figure 1) 

Chassis Assembly (Figure 2) 

External Rear Housing (Figure 3) 

Front Bezel (Figure 4) 

Logic Board — Macintosh SE (Figure 5) 

Logic Board — Macintosh SE/30 (Figure 6) 

Analog Board (Figure 7) 

Shipping Fixture, 800K/1.4 MB Drives (Figure 8) 

Dual Internal 800K Drives (Figure 9) 

Internal HDA (Figure 10) 



Note: The labels FDHD and FDHD/SuperDrive refer to 
the same product. 



©Apple Computer, Inc., 1987-1990. No portion of this document may be reproduced in any form 
without the written permission of Apple Computer, Inc. 

MacTest, FDHD, Apple Desktop Bus, and SuperDrive are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 

Macintosh, AppleCAT, AppleTalk, Apple, and the Apple logo are registered trademarks of Apple 
Computer, Inc. 

MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. 

NuBus™ is a trademark of Texas Instruments. 



iv / Contents rev. Nov 90 Macintosh SE and SE/30 



ft Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 



Section 1 - Basics 



□ CONTENTS 








1.2 


Product Description 




1.2 


Macintosh SE Features 




1.3 


Macintosh SE/30 Features 




1.6 


FDHD Disk Drive 




1.7 


Connector Identification 




1.10 


Internal Expansion Connectors 




1.11 


Theory of Operation 




1.11 


Introduction 




1.11 


Main Logic Board 




1.14 


Power Supply 




1.14 


Analog Board 




1.14 


CRT and Video Board 




1.15 


Disk Drive(s) 




1.15 


SCSI Hard Disk 




1.15 


Apple Desktop Bus Keyboard and Mouse 




1.16 


Care and Handling 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Mar 90 



Basics/ 1.1 



□ PRODUCT DESCRIPTION 



Macintosh SE 
Features 



The Macintosh® SE is an enhanced Macintosh Plus that 
supports internal and external customized expansion 
options. This Macintosh comes with 1 or 2 megabytes 
of RAM installed, with upgrades to 2.5 and 4 megabytes 
available. The system also contains an internal 
connector for expansion of the CPU bus, and provides 
the customer with a choice of two drive configurations: 

• Two internal floppy disk drives 

• One internal floppy disk drive and one internal, 
20 MB or 40 MB SCSI hard disk drive 

The high-density (1.4 MB) Apple Floppy Drive High 
Density (FDHD) disk drive is now the standard internal 
drive for all Macintosh SEs, Macintosh SEs sold before 
August 1989 were furnished with 800K internal disk 
drives. 

The Macintosh SE supports the same peripherals as the 
Macintosh Plus, and will accept any keyboard or mouse 
that connects to the new Apple Desktop Bus™. 



Macintosh SE 

Internal 

Features 



The Macintosh SE includes these new or improved (as 
compared to the Macintosh Plus) internal features: 

• 1 MB or 2 MB of RAM on repositioned, slanted 
Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs) 

• New 256K ROM with modifications that support the 
Apple Desktop Bus and FDHD disk drive, and 
improve support of the Small Computer System 
Interface (SCSI) and AppleTalk 

• Choice of internal 20 MB or 40 MB SCSI hard disk 
or second internal floppy disk drive 

• Higher capacity 80-watt, wide-input-range power 
supply 

• Fan for cooling 

• Improved hardware handshaking on the SCSI port 






1 .2 / Basics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






• 96-pin Euro-DIN bus connector for internal 
expansion board or other I/O device (mounting 
holes provided) 



• Swing-away logic board mounting to allow easy 
removal when an internal expansion board is 
installed 

• One or two 1.4 MB, 3.5-inch FDHD disk drives 

• SWIM disk controller chip, which replaces the IWM 
chip for controlling disk drives 

• Long-life lithium battery for clock and RAM cache 



Macintosh SE 

External 

Features 



The Macintosh SE includes these external features: 

• Two Apple Desktop Bus connectors that support the 
detached keyboard and mouse 



• Snap-out door at the rear to support optional 
external I/O device 



Macintosh SE/30 
Features 



The Macintosh SE/30, which is named for its 16-MHz 
68030 microprocessor, is the next generation in the 
compact Macintosh SE line. The system is designed to 
provide increased performance (up to four times faster 
than the Macintosh SE), greater memory expandability 
(up to 8 megabytes), and larger hard disk capacity. 



Macintosh SE/30 

System 

Configurations 



The Macintosh SE/30 requires System 6.0.3 (or later) 
software. The system comes with 1 or 4 megabytes of 
RAM installed, and contains a 120-pin, vertically 
mounted expansion connector. The system also includes 
an internal FDHD disk drive. The customer can choose 
from three standard configurations: 

• 1 MB of RAM and the FDHD drive 

• 1 MB of RAM, FDHD drive, and 40 MB SCSI hard 
disk 

• 4 MB of RAM, FDHD drive, and 80 MB SCSI hard 
disk 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Basics / 1 .3 



Macintosh SE/30 

System 

Features 



The Macintosh SE/30 includes the following system 
features: 



68030 microprocessor running at 16 MHz 

68882 floating-point (numerics) coprocessor 

1 MB or 4 MB of RAM on vertically mounted Single 
In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs) 

Eight repositioned SIMM sockets that can 
accommodate system expansion to 8 MB 

Single 32-bit, 120-pin expansion slot ("030 Direct 
Slot") 

Four 256K ROMs on a SIMM, upgraded to support 
the FDHD disk drive 

SWIM disk controller chip, which replaces the IWM 
chip for controlling disk drives 

Single 1.4 MB, 3.5-inch FDHD disk drive 

Choice of internal 40 MB or 80 MB SCSI hard disk 
drive 

Removable, seven-year lithium battery 



i 



Macintosh SE/30 
Logic Board 



At the heart of the Macintosh SE/30 is the Motorola 
68030 microprocessor (Figure 1, #1). The 68030 is a 
true 32-bit microprocessor that is fully compatible with 
earlier 16- and 24-bit Macintosh microprocessors. This 
high-performance microprocessor runs at 16 MHz and is 
designed to handle paged memory management 
(incorporates the PMMU chip available for the 
Macintosh II logic board). A 68882 numerics coprocessor 
(Figure 1, #2) enhances system performance by assisting 
with the floating-point calculations common in 
spreadsheet applications. 



1 .4 / Basics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 




FIGURE 1 

The Macintosh SE/30 logic board includes new ROM 
chips soldered on a SIMM board (Figure 1, #3). These 
ROM chips include code that supports the FDHD disk 
drive and SWIM disk controller chip. The SWIM chip 
(Figure 1, #4) enables the FDHD to read and write both 
GCR (Group-Coded Recording) data formats and MFM 
(Modified Frequency Modification) data formats. 

RAM memory in the Macintosh SE/30 is packaged in 
256K or 1 MB Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs). 
The Macintosh SE/30 logic board has two banks of 
sockets that will hold up to eight SIMMs. Bank A 
(Figure 1, #5) and Bank B (Figure 1, #6) each contain 
four slots. Each bank, if used, must be filled with 
identical 256K or 1 MB SIMMs. The following chart 
illustrates RAM configurations that the Macintosh SE/30 
will support: 



RAM 



Bank A 



Bank B 



1 MB 


Four 256K SIMMs 


Empty 


2 MB 


Four 256K SIMMs 


Four 256K SIMMs 


4 MB 


Four 1 MB SIMMs 


Empty 


5 MB 


Four 1 MB SIMMs 


Four 256K SIMMs 


8 MB 


Four 1 MB SIMMs 


Four 1 MB SIMMs 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Basics / 1 .5 



FDHD The 3.5-inch, 1.4 MB FDHD disk drive is a high-density 

Disk Drive data storage system for both the Macintosh SE and the 

Macintosh SE/30. Special high-density, 3.5-inch media 
are required to take full advantage of the increased 
data storage capacity of the FDHD drive. Do not, 
however, use the high-density media in a 400K or 800K 
disk drive; such data will be unreliable. A simple rule- 
of-thumb is always to use media that are appropriate for 
the drive of lowest capacity; if you have both 800K and 
1.4 MB disk drives, to be safe use only 800K media. 

When used with the Apple File Exchange utility, the 
FDHD disk drive also enables Apple systems (GCR data 
format) to exchange data with MS-DOS systems (MFM 
data format). The FDHD disk drive can read/write and 
format 400K, 800K, and 1.4 MB Macintosh disks; 720K 
and 1.4 MB MS-DOS disks; and 800K ProDOS disks. 
When reading data in other formats, the Macintosh 
SE/30 first copies MS-DOS- or ProDOS data files using 
the FDHD drive and Apple File Exchange utility, and 
then uses special file translators to convert the data 
from one application format to another. Some 
applications, such as Microsoft Word, perform their own 
translations. 



1 .6 / Basics rev. Aug 89 Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Connector Identification 



The external connectors on the Macintosh SE and 
Macintosh SE/30 are the same, but the internal 
connectors differ slightly between models. The following 
section shows the location of all external and internal 
connectors on the Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30. 



Back Panel 
Connectors 



The back panel of the Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 
has seven installed ports, and a slot for the installation 
of an additional expansion port. The number beside the 
port name below corresponds to the numbered arrow in 
Figure 2. 



#1 Apple Desktop Bus (mini DIN-4) 

#2 Apple Desktop Bus (mini DIN-4) 

#3 External drive port (DB-19) 

#4 SCSI port (DB-25) 

#5 Printer port (mini DIN-8) 

#6 Modem port (mini DIN-8) 

#7 Sound port (RCA phono jack) 

#8 Slot for optional expansion port 




FIGURE 2 






Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Basics / 1 .7 



Macintosh SE 
Main Logic Board 
Connectors 



There are six connectors on the Macintosh SE logic 
board. In the list below, the number beside the 
connector name corresponds to the numbered arrow in 
Figure 3. 



i 



#1 Power connector 

#2 Connector for lower internal drive 

#3 Connector for upper internal drive 

#4 Internal hard disk SCSI 50-pin ribbon cable 

connector 

#5 Speaker connector 

#6 96-pin Euro-DIN expansion connector 




FIGURE 3 



1 .8 / Basics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Macintosh SE/30 
Main Logic Board 
Connectors 



There are five connectors on the Macintosh SE/30 logic 
board. In the list below, the number beside the 
connector name corresponds to the numbered arrow in 
Figure 4. 



#1 Power connector 

#2 Connector for internal 1.4 MB, 3.5-inch FDHD 

disk drive 
#3 Internal hard disk SCSI 50-pin ribbon cable 

connector 
#4 Speaker connector 
#5 120-pin, 32-bit, "030 Direct Slot" expansion 

connector 




FIGURE 4 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Basics / 1 .9 



Internal 

Expansion 

Connectors 



The Macintosh SE contains a 96-pin, right-angle 
connector for supporting Apple and third-party 
expansion cards. This connector has been replaced in 
the Macintosh SE/30 by a 120-pin connector that is 
vertically mounted to simplify installation. 






Macintosh SE 
96-pin Expansion 
Connector 



The 96-pin Euro-DIN connector on the Macintosh SE 
logic board may be used in either of two ways: 

• To attach a third-party coprocessor board directly to 
the logic board via a right-angle connector. The 
coprocessor board (measuring about 4X8 inches) 
would lie above and parallel to the logic board, 
supported by standoffs that may be installed in the 
logic board holes provided for that purpose. 

• To attach a cable that is then routed to an external 
I/O device. From the connector on the logic board, 
the cable is routed up through the forward hole in 
the bottom of the metal chassis, through the 
mounting bracket on the rear of the chassis, and out 
through the snap-out accessory door on the rear of 
the case. (Remove the rear accessory door from 
inside the case.) 

Note: Protruding tabs on some Macintosh SE chassis 
may interfere with the installation of third-party 
coprocessor boards, cards, or cables. If you encounter 
such an installation problem, perform the "Chassis Tab 
Modification" procedure (see Additional Procedures). 



Macintosh SE/30 
"030 Direct Slot" 
Expansion 
Connector 



The internal expansion connector in the Macintosh SE/30, 
known as the "030 Direct Slot," enables Apple and 
third-party expansion cards to directly access the 32-bit 
address and data bus of the 68030 microprocessor. This 
new slot architecture delivers the improved 
performance of the 32-bit bus and has other benefits for 
expansion card developers. However, the greater pin 
demands of the 32-bit bus require using a 120-pin 
connector in the Macintosh SE/30. As a result, most 
accelerator and video expansion cards designed to 
utilize the 1 6-bit data bus in the Macintosh SE cannot 
be used in the Macintosh SE/30. 



1.10 /Basics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






□ THEORY OF OPERATION 



Introduction 



The Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 have eight basic 
functional units: 



Main logic board 

Power supply 

Analog board 

Internal disk drive(s) 

Internal SCSI hard disk (optional for Macintosh SE) 

Video board 

Video display (CRT) 

Apple Desktop Bus keyboard and mouse 



"Module swapping," or repair by replacement of faulty 
modules, is much faster if you have a basic understanding 
of the function of each module in the unit. If you know 
what each module does when it is functioning normally, 
you can more easily decide which module is at fault when 
a particular function is missing or degraded. This is 
called "logical troubleshooting." The following section 
describes the Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 
modules and the functions they perform. 



Main Logic 
Board 



The main logic boards of the Macintosh SE and 
Macintosh SE/30 contain the components described 
below. Components unique to one system or the other 
are identified as such. 



CPU 



Macintosh SE : The Central Processing Unit (CPU) in the 
Macintosh SE is a Motorola 68000 microprocessor. The 
microprocessor gets instructions from memory, translates 
them, and carries them out. It communicates with all 
components on the logic board, and with all peripherals. 

Macintosh SE/30 : At the heart of the Macintosh SE/30 is 
the Motorola 68030 microprocessor with a 32-bit 
external address and data bus. This high-performance 
microprocessor operates at 16 MHz — double the clock 
speed of the 68000. The 68030 microprocessor also 
supports paged memory management, thereby eliminating 
the need for a separate PMMU chip. Paged memory 
management is a type of parallel processing that enables 
the computer to swap pages of data from a disk into 
RAM memory, as needed, which makes the Macintosh 
SE/30 appear to have more memory than it actually has. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Basics/ 1.11 



The Macintosh SE/30 logic board also includes the 
68882 math coprocessor composed of IEEE P754 
standard floating-point ICs. The 68882 provides a high 
degree of precision and speed for Macintosh programs. 



RAM Macintosh SE : Macintosh SE RAM (Random-Access 

Memory) is installed on 150-nanosecond Single In-line 
Memory Modules (SIMMs). Each SIMM is a small printed 
circuit card with mounted ICs. The logic board has four 
sockets for SIMMs. The Macintosh SE comes with four 
256K SIMMs installed for 1 MB of RAM, or with two 
1-MB SIMMs installed for 2 MB of RAM. 

Macintosh SE/30 : The Macintosh SE/30 has two banks 
of four SIMM sockets, and comes with 1 MB or 4 MB of 
RAM. The amount of RAM on the logic board can be 
changed by installing SIMMs of higher memory capacity. 
Each bank must be filled with four SIMMs of the same 
size, and Bank A (the first four rows closest to the 
edge of the board) must be filled first, or filled with 
the SIMMs of higher capacity. Both 256K and 1 MB 
SIMMs are currently available, allowing 1 MB, 2 MB, 
4 MB, 5 MB, or 8 MB configurations. The Macintosh 
SE/30 can use only 120-nanosecond SIMMs. 

Every time the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 is 
powered on, the system performs a memory test to 
determine how much RAM is present in the machine. 



ROM Macintosh SE : The two ROM (Read-Only Memory) 

chips in the Macintosh SE contain the operating code for 
the 68000. The Macintosh SE ROM supports the Apple 
Desktop Bus, SCSI devices, AppleTalk networks, and 
(since August, 1989) the FDHD disk drive. The ROM 
chips at positions D6 and D7 on the logic board are 
socketed. These ROMs should be replaced only when 
installing the FDHD Upgrade Kit. 

Macintosh SE/30 : The four custom chips making up 
system ROM for the Macintosh SE/30 are mounted on a 
single SIMM module. This design facilitates feature set 
upgrades, and allows the technician to easily install 
upgraded or customized ROM. Included in the 256K of 
permanent ROM memory for the Macintosh SE/30 are 
routines for supporting the FDHD disk drive and SWIM 
disk controller, NuBus slot manager, and Apple sound 
manager. 



1.12/ Basics rev. Aug 89 Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Disk 

Controller 

Chip 



Macintosh SE : Macintosh SEs sold after August 
1989, or Macintosh SEs upgraded to run the 1.4 MB 
FDHD disk drive, use the SWIM disk controller chip 
(see the description under "Macintosh SE/30" below). 
Macintosh SEs sold before August 1989 use the IWM 
chip, a self-contained disk controller on one IC that 
supports all Apple format (GCR, for Group Code 
Recording), 3.5-inch internal and external disk drives. 
The IWM simplifies the microprocessor's task of 
reading from and writing to the disk drives. The IWM, 
located at position D8 on the logic board, is socketed 
and may be replaced by the technician. 

Macintosh SE/30 : The Macintosh SE/30 and all current 
versions of the Macintosh SE use a SWIM disk 
controller chip. The SWIM chip incorporates the 
functionality of the IWM, and also enables the FDHD 
disk drive to exchange data between Apple and MS- 
DOS systems. The SWIM chip interprets, converts, and 
outputs dual disk (clock/time) and file (data) signals as 
appropriate for either GCR (variable rotational speed) 
or MFM (constant rotational speed) formats. The SWIM 
chip enables the FDHD drive to read, write, and format 
in both GCR (Apple 400K and 800K) and MFM (MS-DOS 
720K and 1.4 MB; and Apple 1.4 MB) data formats. 



Serial 

Communications 

Controller 



The Serial Communications Controller (SCO handles 
information sent to and received from the serial ports 
on the back of the machine. 



Versatile 
Interface 
Adaptor 



The Versatile Interface Adaptor (VIA) converts serial 
data (from input devices) to parallel data, so that the 
logic board can interpret the information correctly. 



Gate Array 



The Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 incorporate the 
gate array implementation of PAL (Programmable Array 
Logic) and other discrete logic devices. The gate array 
handles control and synchronizing functions for the 
main logic board. 



Oscillator 



The oscillator, or timing device, generates the master 
clock pulse, which is broken down into the various 
timing signals needed by the ICs on the logic board. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Basics/ 1.13 



Battery 



The Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 are equipped 
with a single long-life lithium battery that provides 
power to the system clock and calendar. This battery is 
installed in a battery holder and can be replaced without 
cutting and soldering. In earlier versions of the 
Macintosh SE, the battery is soldered to the logic board. 



Sound Chip 



The sound chip supports the internal speaker connector 
and the external sound jack. The Macintosh SE/30 logic 
board contains a new, full-stereo sound chip. 



SCSI Bus 



The Apple SCSI manager supports up to seven daisy- 
chained SCSI devices. 



Apple 

Desktop 

Bus 



The Apple Desktop Bus is a method and protocol for 
connecting computers with human input devices. The 
Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 control the flow of 
data to connected devices by issuing commands through 
the Apple Desktop Bus. 



Power 
Supply 



The power supply is attached to the bottom half of the 
analog board. This is where AC voltage is converted to 
DC voltage for use by the entire system. The power 
supply operates on standard line voltage and outputs 
various DC voltages, which are used by the logic board, 
the video display, and by some peripheral devices. 



Analog Board 



The analog board contains circuits for both horizontal 
and vertical signals that are fed to the CRT. The 
flyback transformer on the analog board delivers high 
voltage directly to the CRT through the anode 
connector. 



CRT and 
Video Board 



The Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) provides the high- 
resolution video display. The anode of the CRT 
receives high voltage from the flyback transformer on 
the analog board. The analog board also supplies the 
voltages and signals to the neck and yoke of the CRT 
that enable the CRT to create the video display. There 
is a separate video board on the neck of the CRT that 
provides video amplification and overvoltage protection. 



1.14 /Basics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Disk Drive(s) 



The internal disk drive (or drives) used in the 
Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 connect to the main 
logic board through two internally installed connectors. 
An external disk drive may be connected to the disk 
drive port on the back of the logic board. The flow of 
data between the logic board and the disk drives is 
channeled through a disk controller chip, which 
controls reading and writing operations. 

The internal disk drive in the Macintosh SE and 
Macintosh SE/30 is the high-density, 1.4 MB FDHD 
(Floppy Drive High Density) disk drive. The FDHD 
drive reads/writes and formats both GCR and MFM 
format disks, thereby providing data exchangeability 
between MS-DOS, ProDOS, and Macintosh systems. An 
application-specific translator within the Apple File 
Exchange utility program must be used to translate the 
exchanged data for use within an application program. 



SCSI 
Hard Disk 



The SCSI hard disk (optional on the Macintosh SE) 
connects to the logic board through the internal SCSI 
connector. Other SCSI devices may be daisy-chained to 
the Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 through the 
external SCSI port. The SCSI bus on the logic board 
will support a total of seven SCSI devices. 



Apple Desktop 
Bus Keyboard 
and Mouse 



The keyboard connects to the Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) 
port on the Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30. The 
mouse connects to the keyboard or to the computer's 
other ADB port. All devices made for the Apple 
Desktop Bus have a microprocessor that makes them 
intelligent devices. All Apple Desktop Bus devices 
communicate with the logic board via a mini DIN-4 
connector. All except the mouse have ports for daisy- 
chaining other ADB devices. The mouse must be the 
last device in the chain because it has no port. 






Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Basics/ 1.15 



□ CARE AND HANDLING 



I 



The Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 are small 
enough to be somewhat portable. However, the 
computers contain a CRT (cathode-ray tube — the picture 
tube), which operates at very high voltages and contains 
a high vacuum. If cracked or broken, the CRT can 
implode (collapse into itself), then explode. 

WARNING: Before working inside this computer, read 
Section 8, CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. 

Both computers may also contain hard disks (a hard disk 
drive comes standard with the Macintosh SE/30, and is 
optional for the Macintosh SE). The hard disk is a 
mechanical device with moving parts. Rough handling 
such as jarring or bumping, especially while the hard 
disk is running, could result in a mechanical failure or 
damage to the information stored on the hard disk. 
Careless handling accounts for more drive failures than 
all other factors combined. 

With these facts in mind, always be sure to: 

• Leave the Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30, and 
the CRT and hard disk drive modules, in shipping 
containers until use. 

• Use the shipping containers and packing materials 
when transporting the computer or modules. 

• Place the computer on a protective padded surface 
before beginning any repair procedure. 

• Never move a computer with a hard disk drive 
during power-down. After the power is turned off, 
the hard disk will slow down and the heads will 
land within 15 seconds. Any jolts to the drive 
during power-down may cause the heads to crash 
into the media surfaces. 

• Never drop a Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30. 
Even a drop of one inch to a hard surface could 
cause implosion of the CRT and/or a hard disk drive 
failure. 



1.16/ Basics rev. Mar 90 Macintosh SE and SE/30 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 

Section 2 - Take-Apart 



□ CONTENTS 








2.2 


Cover 




2.5 


Discharging the Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.5 


Discharge Procedure 




2.7 


Anode Cap 




2.8 


Analog Board and Power Supply 




2.14 


Main Logic Board 




2.16 


Identifying Macintosh SE Logic Boards 




2.22 


SIMMs 




2.25 


Video Board 




2.28 


Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.31 


Internal SCSI Hard Disk Drive 




2.31 


Identifying 20SC Revision A and B Drives 




2.33 


Upper Internal Disk Drive 




2.36 


Lower Internal Disk Drive 




2.38 


Fan Assembly 




2.42 


Speaker, Front Bezel, and Slot Cover 



Note: If a step is underlined, detailed instructions for 
that step can be found elsewhere in this section. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Oct 90 Take-Apart / 2.1 



□ COVER 



WARNING: Macintosh SE and SE/30 computers contain 
high voltage and a high-vacuum picture tube. To prevent 
serious personal injury and property damage, be sure you 
read and understand the safety precautions in Section 8, 
CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab before you 
remove the back cover. Failure to follow the safety rules 
could result in serious injury. 

CAUTION: Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) can cause 
severe damage to sensitive microcircuits. The Macintosh 
SE and Macintosh SE/30 logic boards contain C-MOS 
components, among the most sensitive chips in use 
today. Printed circuit assemblies and ICs (integrated 
circuits, or "chips"), especially those that are removable, 
must also be handled with extreme care. The Macintosh 
SE and Macintosh SE/30 also have removable ROMs, 
ROM SIMMs, and RAM SIMMs, which contain the RAM 
memory. The C-MOS chips, ROMs, and SIMMs are very 
susceptible to ESD damage. To prevent ESD damage to 
these components, follow the precautions outlined for 
ESD prevention in You Oughta Know. 



Materials Required 



Foam pad 

Small flat-blade screwdriver 
15-inch Torx screwdriver 
Pull-apart tool 



Remove 



Remove the cover as follows: 



1. Place the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 on the 
foam pad in an area where you will have ample room 
to remove the cover. Don't put it under shelves 
containing objects that could fall on the CRT and 
break it. 

Note: Be especially careful when handling a 
Macintosh SE/30, or a Macintosh SE with an internal 
hard disk. Read "Care and Handling" in the Basics 
section before continuing. 

2. Turn off the power and disconnect the power cord. 

3. Disconnect the keyboard and mouse cables and all 
other peripheral cables from the back of the 
Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30. 






2.2 / Take-Apart 



rev. Mar 90 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 







FIGURE 1 

4. If a reset/interrupt switch (Figure 1, #1) is present, 
pry it off with a small flat-blade screwdriver. 

5. Place the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 face- 
down on the pad. 

6. Use the Torx screwdriver to remove the four case 
screws (Figure 1, #2). 

7. Carefully lift up the cover and set it out of the way. 
If the cover is difficult to remove, use the pull-apart 
tool. (To prevent cosmetic damage to the cover and 
bezel, do not use a screwdriver to pry off the cover.) 

8. Remove the insulating paper shroud from the bottom 
of the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30. 



Replace 



Replace the cover as follows: 

WARNING: The edges of the metal chassis may be 
sharp. When moving the computer with the cover 
removed, be sure to handle the metal chassis carefully. 

1. Place the computer face-down on the foam pad. 

2. Replace the insulating paper shroud over the bottom 
of the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Apr 89 



Take- Apart / 2.3 







FIGURE 2 

3. Slide the cover over the chassis and fit it into the 
front bezel, making sure the video ground cable 
(Figure 2, #1) is out of the way of the case screw 
holder (Figure 2, #2). 

4. Reinstall the four case screws (Figure 3, #2). 

Note: The two black screws should be installed in 
the bottom of the case and the two silver screws in 
the top. 

5. Reinstall the reset/interrupt switch (Figure 3, #1). 




FIGURE 3 



2.4 / Take-Apart 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






□ DISCHARGING THE CATHODE-RAY TUBE (CRT) 



The CRT in the Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 is 
equipped with a bleeder resistor that automatically 
drains the charge from the CRT when the power is shut 
off. Nevertheless, you must follow the discharge 
procedure below to protect yourself in the event that 
the resistor has failed and the anode is still charged. 



Materials Required 



Safety goggles 

Foam pad (ungrounded) 

Needlenose pliers 

Alligator lead 

New CRT discharge tool (part number 076-0381) 



WARNING: Before starting, read the safety precautions 
and the CRT discharge procedure in Section 8, CRT 
Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. Alternative 
instructions for discharging the CRT using the older 
version of the discharge tool (and/or a screwdriver) are 
also given in that section. 



Discharge 
Procedure 



1. Remove your grounding wriststrap and jewelry and 
put on safety goggles before beginning! 



WARNING: Do not touch the yoke wires (Figure 4, #1), 
the anode wire (Figure 4, #2), the anode connector 
(Figure 4, #3), or the flyback transformer (Figure 4, #4). 




FIGURE 4 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Mar 90 



Take-Apart / 2.5 



2. Remove the cover . 

3. Set the monitor upright on the ungrounded foam pad, 
with the back of the monitor facing you. 



i 




FIGURE 5 

4. Attach the alligator clip on the CRT discharge tool 
to the metal part of the ground lug (Figure 5, #1). 

CAUTION: Discharge the anode to the metal part of the 
ground lug displayed in Figure 5, #1. Failure to do so will 
damage the main logic board and/or the analog board, 

5. Put one hand behind your back and grasp the handle 
of the discharge tool with your other hand. 

WARNING: Use only one hand when discharging the 

CRT This is to prevent you from becoming a path for 
current should your hand slip and touch the metal part of 
the discharge tool. While discharging the CRT, grasp only 
the insulated handle of the discharge tool. 

6. Hold the CRT discharge tool to the tube surface, and 
insert it under the anode cap (Figure 5, #2) until it 
touches the anode ring. 



2.6 / Take-Apart 



rev. Mar 90 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



7. Remove the CRT discharge tool from under the 
anode cap. Remove the alligator clip from the 
ground lug. Set the tool aside where it will be out 
of the way. 



Note: If the bleeder resistor fails, a secondary charge 
can build up over time, even after you have discharged 
the CRT. If repairs are not finished within 30 minutes, 
the anode should be discharged again. Or, to ensure 
that any residual charge is dissipated during the service 
procedure, establish a path for anode current to ground 
by fastening one end of an alligator lead to the metal 
ground lug and connecting the other end to the anode 
ring. 



Anode 
Cap 



For some of the following procedures, you may have 
to remove the anode cap. To do so, peel back the 
anode cap until you can see the anode ring at the 
center. Look at the metal connector in the center of the 
cap and notice how it is clipped into the CRT. Use the 
needlenose pliers to compress the two prongs on the 
clip to free it from the CRT, and lift it off the tube. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Mar 90 



Take-Apart / 2.7 



□ ANALOG BOARD AND POWER SUPPLY 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Small Phillips screwdriver 



i 



Remove 



To remove the analog board and power supply: 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Remove the anode cap (Figure 6, #1). 




FIGURE 6 

3. Move the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 onto a 
soft, grounded workbench pad and put on your 
grounding wriststrap. (Never do this until after the 
CRT is discharged.) 

4. Carefully pull the video board (Figure 6, #3) off the 
neck of the CRT. 



2.8 / Take- Apart 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



5. Remove the following cables from the analog board: 

• Yoke cable (Figure 6, #2) (First depress the tab.) 

• Main logic board cable (Figure 6, #4) 

• Video board cable (Figure 6, #5) 

• Hard disk power cable, if present (Figure 6, #6) 

6. Remove the screw holding the power supply ground 
wire to the chassis (Figure 6, #7). 




FIGURE 7 

7. Using the small Phillips screwdriver, remove the 
two lower left analog board screws and the metal 
clip (Figure 7, #1). 

8. Remove the two lower right analog board screws 
(Figure 7, #2). 

9. Place the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 face 
down on the grounded workbench pad. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



Take-Apart / 2.9 




FIGURE 8 

10. Carefully move the analog board (with power supply 
attached) up and away from the chassis, taking care 
not to bump the CRT or the brightness control knob 
(Figure 8, #1) at the lower front of the analog 
board. 

WARNING: Do not grasp the analog board by the fan. 
Hold the analog board by the edges, using your fingertips. 

11. Disconnect the power supply cable (Figure 8, #2) 
from the analog board. 




FIGURE 9 



2.10 /Take- Apart 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



12. Place the board on the grounded workbench pad with 
the power supply down, and remove the four power 
supply screws (Figure 9, #1). Lift the board free. 




FIGURE 10 

13. If you are returning the analog board to Apple, first 
remove the brightness knob (Figure 10, #1) and put 
the knob on the replacement analog board. 



Replace 



Follow the steps below to replace the power supply and 
analog board. Also, if you are installing a new analog 
board on a Macintosh SE, and a clip-on ferrite bead is 
packaged with the new analog board, you may have to 
install the ferrite bead on the video board cable. Check 
your video board; if a ferrite bead is not on the cable, 
install the clip-on ferrite bead enclosed with the new 
analog board on the video board cable (see the Video 
Board procedure). 

1. Place the power supply on the inside of the analog 
board, using the painted outline on the board as a 
guide (Figure 10, #2). 

2. Holding the power supply in position, flip the 
analog board and power supply to a face-down 
position with the power supply underneath. Do not 
grasp the analog board by the fan. 

3. Replace the four power supply screws (Figure 9, #1). 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.11 




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FIGURE 11 

4. Reconnect the power supply cable (Figure 11, #1). 

5. With the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 face down 
on the grounded workbench pad, carefully place the 
analog board/power supply unit in the chassis, 
taking care not to bump the CRT or the brightness 
knob at the lower front of the analog board. It is 
easiest if you slide the corner with the brightness 
knob in first, then maneuver the power supply cage 
past the metal bracket at the back of the chassis. 
Again, do not grasp the analog board by the fan. 

6. Replace the metal clip and the two lower-left analog 
board screws (Figure 12, #1). 




FIGURE 12 



2.12 /Take-Apart 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 




FIGURE 13 

7. Replace the two lower-right analog board screws 
(Figure 12, #2). 

8. Reconnect the following cables to the analog board: 

• Yoke cable (Figure 13, #1) 

• Main logic board cable (Figure 13, #3) 

• Video board cable (Figure 13, #4) 

• Hard disk drive power cable (Figure 13, #5), if 
present 

9. Replace the anode cap (Figure 13, #6). 

10. Reconnect the video board (Figure 13, #2) to the 
neck of the CRT. It fits only one way. 

11. Replace the screw that secures the power supply 
ground wire to the chassis (Figure 13, #7). 

12. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.13 



□ MAIN LOGIC BOARD 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Small Phillips screwdriver 
IC extractor 



i 



Remove 



Follow these steps to remove the main logic board: 
1. Remove the cover. 



2. Discharge the CRT . 

3. Put on your grounding wriststrap. (Never do this 
until after the CRT has been discharged.) 

CAUTION: In the following step, pull only on the pulltabs 
or on the connectors themselves, not on the cables. 

4. Carefully pull the video board (Figure 14, #4) off 
the neck of the CRT. 




FIGURE 14 



2.1 4 /Take- Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



5. Remove these connectors from the main logic board: 

• Hard disk drive cable, if present (Figure 14, #1) 

• Internal disk drive cable(s) (Figure 14, #2) 

• Power supply cable (Figure 14, #3) (You must 
depress the holding clip on this connector 
before you can pull it out.) 

6. Place the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 face 
down on a grounded workbench pad, with the 
bottom of the main logic board facing you. You will 
see that the right edge of the board is notched and 
the left edge is smooth. 




FIGURE 15 

7. Holding the board by the edges, slide it up until the 
tabs on the right edge of the board exactly match the 
notches in the right metal bracket (Figure 15, #1). 

8. Swing the right edge of the board free of the metal 
bracket and lift the board out of the metal chassis. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.15 



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FIGURE 16 

9. With the main logic board held upright beside the 
computer, disconnect the speaker cable 
(Figure 16, #1). Place the board on the grounded 
workbench pad. 



Identifying 
Macintosh SE 
Logic Boards 



Two logic boards are available as exchange modules for 
the Macintosh SE. If you are replacing the logic board 
of a Macintosh SE that was originally shipped with an 
FDHD drive, use logic board 661-0536. If your 
customer's computer was originally shipped with an 
800K internal drive, or has been upgraded to use an 
FDHD drive, use replacement logic board 661-0526. 

Be sure to use an exchange logic board that is 
configured the same as the customer's original board. 

Use the following procedure to identify the correct 
exchange module: 



2.1 6 /Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






1. Identify the customer's battery configuration 
(Figure 17, #1): 



a) If the battery is installed in a battery holder 
(Figure 17, #2), use replacement logic board 
661-0536 and go directly to the steps for 
replacing the logic board (see "Replace"). 

b) If the battery is soldered to the logic board 
(Figure 17, #3), perform step 2 next. 





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FIGURE 17 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.17 



2. Identify the customer's disk controller chip 
(Figure 18, #1): 

a) If the part number on the disk controller chip 
is 344-0062 (SWIM chip), use replacement 
logic board 661-0526 and perform step 3 next. 

b) If the part number on the disk controller 
chip is not 344-0062, use replacement logic 
board 661-0526 and go directly to the steps 
for replacing the logic board (see "Replace"). 






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FIGURE 18 



IMPORTANT: Failure to transfer the customer's SWIM chip 
and upgraded ROMs to the replacement logic board will 
prevent an FDHD drive from utilizing high -density media. 

3. Using the IC extractor, remove the following chips 
from the customer's logic board and install them in 
the same positions on the replacement logic board. 
(The notched end of the chips should face the front 
of the logic board. For more information see "1.4 MB 
Apple FDHD Upgrade for the Macintosh SE" in 
Section 5, Additional Procedures.) 

• SWIM (Figure 18, #1) 

• Low ROM (Figure 18, #2) 

• Hi ROM (Figure 18, #3) 

Return the ROMs and IWM chip to Apple on the 
customer's faulty logic board. 



2.18 /Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Replace 



1. Position the main logic board at the rear of the 
Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30. The tabbed edge 
of the board should be on the right. 

2. Reconnect the speaker cable (Figure 19, #1) to the 
main logic board. 



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FIGURE 19 

3. Fit the smooth left edge of the main logic board into 
the slot in the metal frame. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.19 



4. Exactly align the tabs on the right edge of the board 
with the notches on the right metal bracket 
(Figure 20, #1), and settle the right edge of the 
board into the right metal bracket. Slide the board 
down until you hear it click into place. 







FIGURE 20 

5. Place the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 upright, 
so that you can see the inside of the chassis. 






2.20 /Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 







FIGURE 21 

6. Reconnect the following to the main logic board: 

• Internal disk drive cable(s) (Figure 21, #1) 

• Power supply cable (Figure 21, #2) 

• Hard disk drive cable, if present (Figure 21, #3) 

7. Reconnect the video board (Figure 21, #4) to the 
neck of the CRT. It fits only one way. 

8. Replace the cover . 

Note: If the diagnostics indicates that the replacement 
logic board is bad, and the original board had been 
upgraded for the FDHD drive, you may have swapped 
bad ROM or SWIM chips. Run AppleCAT and observe 
the test results displayed on the Status line. If any 
ROM or SWIM chips are faulty, replace the bad chips 
and reinstall the customer's original logic board. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Take-Apart / 2.21 



□ SIMMs 



Macintosh SE : The Macintosh SE logic board has four 
SIMM sockets, as shown in Figure 22. It comes with 1 
megabyte of RAM installed on four 256K Single In-line 
Memory Modules (SIMMs), or with 2 megabytes of RAM 
installed on two 1 MB SIMMs. The original 256K and 1 
MB SIMMs for the Macintosh SE are 150 nanosecond; 
replacement SIMMs are 120 nanosecond. (The 120- and 
150-nanosecond SIMMs are interchangeable in the 
Macintosh SE.) 

Macintosh SE/30 : The Macintosh SE/30 logic board has 
two banks of four SIMM sockets, as shown in Figure 23. 
It comes in a 1-megabyte configuration that has four 
256K SIMMs installed in bank A, or in a 4-megabyte 
configuration with four 1 MB SIMMs installed in bank A. 
All Macintosh SE/30 SIMMs are 120 nanosecond. 

Note: Refer to Section 7, Additional Procedures, for 
procedures specifically addressing memory upgrades. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 



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FIGURE 22 



2.22 / Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Bank B< 



Bank A 




FIGURE 23 



Remove 



Follow the steps below to remove a SIMM from the 
main logic board: 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Put on your grounding wriststrap and place the 
Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 on the grounded 
workbench pad. (Never put on the grounding 
wriststrap until after the CRT has been discharged.) 

3. Remove the main logic board . 



4. To remove a SIMM, use the SIMM removal tool. See 
You Oughta Know for instruction on tool usage. 

CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to ESD and skin 
acid damage. Handle only by the edges. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Take-Apart / 2.23 









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FIGURE 24 



Replace 



Follow the steps below to replace a SIMM: 

1. With the contacts (Figure 24, #1) on the SIMM 
pointing down, insert the module into the connector 
at an angle (bottom forward). 

2. Push back on the top corners of the module. You 
will hear a click when the module snaps into place. 

3. Replace the main logic board and the cover . 



2.24 / Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






□ VIDEO BOARD 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Torx screwdriver 



Remove 



Follow the steps below to remove the video board: 

1. Remove the cover . 

2. Discharge the CRT . 

WARNING: Leave your safety goggles on for the 
remainder of this procedure. 

3. Put on your grounding wriststrap and place the 
Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 on the grounded 
workbench pad. (Never put on the grounding 
wriststrap until after the CRT has been discharged.) 

CAUTION: Whenever working on the upper part of the 
chassis, always pull the video board off the neck of the 
CRT or remove it totally. This will help avoid damage to 
the CRT 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Take-Apart / 2.25 







FIGURE 25 

4. Carefully pull the video board (Figure 25, #3) off 
the neck of the CRT. 

5. Disconnect the video board connector (Figure 25, 
#1) from the analog board. 

6. Remove the Torx screw holding the video ground 
wire to the upper-left CRT mounting bracket 
(Figure 25, #2). 



Replace 



CAUTION: The redesigned, vertically mounted video 
board must be installed with the new axial fan. The new 
axial fan will not allow for adequate vibration clearance 
when installed with the old, horizontally mounted video 
board. 

New video boards come with an attached ferrite bead 
(Figure 26, #1) to reduce interference. If your video 
board does not have a ferrite bead attached to the cable, 
and you are installing a new analog board that is 
packaged with a clip-on ferrite bead, install the ferrite 
bead on the video board cable as shown in steps 1 and 2 
below. 



2.26 /Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 







FIGURE 26 

1. Position the clip-on ferrite bead (Figure 26, #1) 
around the video board cable as near the video 
board connector (Figure 26, #2) as possible. Snap 
the ferrite bead shut. 

2. Install a plastic tie-wrap (Figure 26, #3) on the 
cable to hold the ferrite bead near the connector. 
Cut off excess tie- wrap. 

3. Place the video ground wire tab over the upper-left 
CRT mounting bracket and replace the Torx screw 
(Figure 25, #2). Be sure the ground wire is routed 
away from the case screw holder (Figure 25, #4). 

4. Reconnect the video board connector (Figure 25, #1) 
to the analog board. 

Note: A plastic guide may be installed over the 
leads on the tip of the CRT. If so, pull the guide off 
before reconnecting the video board to the CRT. 

5. Reconnect the video board (Figure 25, #3) to the 
neck of the CRT. It fits only one way. 

Note: Before replacing the cover, make sure the 
video picture is adjusted to the right height and 
width. Refer to the "Size Adjustments" steps under 
"Video Adjustments" in Section 3. 

6. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Aug 89 Take-Apart / 2.27 



□ CATHODE-RAY TUBE (CRT) 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Torx screwdriver 



i 



Remove 



Follow the steps below to remove the CRT: 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

WARNING: Leave your safety goggles on for the 
remainder of this procedure. 

2. Remove the anode cap. 

3. Move the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 onto a 
soft, grounded workbench pad and put on your 
grounding wriststrap. (Never put on the grounding 
wriststrap until after the CRT is discharged.) 

4. Remove the video board . 

5. Remove the analog board . (Do not remove the 
power supply from the analog board.) 




FIGURE 27 



2.28 /Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



I 



6. Using the Torx screwdriver, remove the three 
remaining mounting screws from the corners of the 
CRT (Figure 27, #1). 

7. Lift the CRT free from the bezel. 



Replace 



Follow the steps below to replace the CRT: 

1. Place the CRT face down in the bezel, with the 
anode aperture (Figure 27, #2) on the left, as shown. 

2. Replace the three CRT mounting screws shown in 
Figure 27, #1. 




FIGURE 28 

3. Replace the analog board/power supply . 

4. Replace the video board (Figure 28, #1). 

Note: Directions for replacing the fourth CRT 
mounting screw (Figure 28, #2) are included in the 
video board procedure. 

5. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Take-Apart / 2.29 







FIGURE 29 




Revision A 




Revision B 
FIGURE 30 






2.30 / Take-Apart 



rev. Oct 90 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






□ INTERNAL SCSI HARD DISK DRIVE 



Apple currently ships two versions of the internal Hard 
Disk 20SC. To the customer, the Hard Disk 20SC 
Revision A drive and the Hard Disk 20SC Revision B 
drive are identical, but these drives must be replaced 
like-for-like. To differentiate between the drives, 
refer to "Identifying 20SC Revision A and B Drives." 
For part numbers, refer to Illustrated Parts List or your 
Apple Service Programs binder. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Medium Phillips screwdriver 



Remove 



Follow the steps below to remove an internal SCSI hard 
disk drive. The same steps apply to all SCSI drives 
available in the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30. 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 onto a 
soft, grounded workbench pad, and put on your 
grounding wriststrap. (Never put on the grounding 
wriststrap until after the CRT is discharged.) 

3. Remove the video board . 

4. Disconnect the hard disk drive cable from the main 
logic board (Figure 29, #1). 

5. Disconnect the hard disk drive power cable from 
the analog board (Figure 29, #2). 

6. Remove the two Phillips screws that secure the 
hard disk drive housing to the lower drive housing 
(Figure 29, #3), and lift out the hard disk assembly. 

7. Before returning the hard disk assembly to Apple, 
remove the 50-pin SCSI connector cable. 



Identifying 20SC 
Revision A and B Drives 



20SC Revision A and Revision B drives must be 
replaced like-for-like. To differentiate between drive 
versions, check their circuit boards. For Revision A 
drives the component side of the board is up 
(Figure 30, #1); for Revision B boards the solder side 
is up (Figure 30, #2). 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.31 



Replace 1. Replace the 50-pin SCSI connector cable on the hard 

disk assembly. 

2. Slide the hard disk assembly over the lower drive 
so that the tabs on the bottom of the hard drive 
housing mesh with the top holes on the lower drive 
housing. 

3. Replace the two screws that secure the hard disk 
housing to the lower drive housing (Figure 29, #3). 

4. Reconnect the hard disk drive power cable to the 
analog board (Figure 29, #2). 

5. Reconnect the hard disk drive cable to the main 
logic board (Figure 29 #1). 

6. Replace the video board . 

7. Replace the cover . 



■ 



2.32 / Take-Apart rev. Oct 90 Macintosh SE and SE/30 



□ UPPER INTERNAL DISK DRIVE 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Medium Phillips screwdriver 



Remove 



Follow the steps below to remove the optional upper 
internal drive from the Macintosh SE (only): 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh SE onto a soft, grounded work- 
bench pad and put on your grounding wriststrap. 
(Never put on the grounding wriststrap until after 
the CRT is discharged.) 




FIGURE 31 

3. Remove the video board . 

4. Disconnect the upper internal disk drive cable from 
connector J7 on the main logic board (Figure 31, #1). 

5. Remove the two screws (Figure 31, #2) from the 
metal bracket that holds the two drive housings 
together. Lift off the metal bracket. 

6. Slide the upper internal drive forward and lift it out. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.33 



Replace 



1. Remove the dummy packing disk from the 
replacement internal drive mechanism. 

2. To place the upper drive into the chassis over the 
installed lower drive, slide the upper internal drive 
forward, then back over the lower internal drive so 
that the tabs on the top of the lower drive housing 
mesh with the holes on the bottom of the upper 
drive housing (Figure 32, #1). 




FIGURE 32 

Place the metal bracket over the two drive housings 
so that the slot in the bracket (Figure 33, #1) fits 
over the tab on the upper housing. 




FIGURE 33 






2.34 / Take-Apart 



rev. Oct 90 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Replace the two Phillips screws (Figure 33, #2) that 
secure the metal bracket to the lower internal drive 
housing. 




FIGURE 34 

5. Reconnect the upper internal disk drive cable to 
connector J7 on the main logic board 

(Figure 34, #1). 

Note: You must use the longer of the two available 
yellow-coded internal disk drive cables for the 
upper drive. The shorter cable will not reach to the 
main logic board. (The two cables are identical 
except for length.) 

6. Replace the video board . 

7. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.35 



□ LOWER INTERNAL DISK DRIVE 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Medium Phillips screwdriver 






Remove 



Although the disk drives may be different, follow the 
steps below to remove the lower internal disk drive 
from a Macintosh SE or from a Macintosh SE/30. 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 onto a 
soft, grounded workbench pad and put on your 
grounding wriststrap. (Never put on a grounding 
wriststrap until after the CRT is discharged.) 

3. Remove the video board . 

4. Remove the hard disk drive or upper internal drive , 
whichever is present. 

5. Remove the main logic board . 




FIGURE 35 



2.36 / Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






6. With the bottom of the chassis facing you, remove 
the four Phillips screws (Figure 35, #1) that secure 
the lower internal drive to the bottom of the metal 
chassis. Lift the drive free. 



Replace 



1. Remove the dummy packing disk from the 
replacement drive mechanism. 




FIGURE 36 

2. Place the drive into the chassis so that the tabs on 
the bottom of the metal drive housing fit into the 
holes provided in the chassis frame (Figure 36, #1). 

3. Replace the four Phillips screws (Figure 35, #1) 
that secure the internal drive to the bottom of the 
metal chassis. 

4. Replace the main logic board . 

5. Replace the hard disk or upper internal drive . 

6. Replace the video board . 

7. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Nov 89 



Take-Apart / 2.37 



□ FAN ASSEMBLY 



CAUTION: There are two fan styles: the older cross-flow 
(cylindrical) fan and the newer axial (round) fan. The axial 
fan, since it is wider, must be installed with the redesigned, 
vertically mounted CRT video board. The axial fan will not 
allow adequate vibration clearance with the old, 
horizontally mounted CRT video board. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Exacto knife 
Soldering iron 
Torx screwdriver 



Remove 



Follow the steps below to remove the fan assembly: 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 onto a 
soft, grounded workbench pad and put on your 
grounding wriststrap. (Never put on a grounding 
wriststrap until after the CRT is discharged.) 

3. Remove the video board . 



4. Remove the analog board . 

5. Remove the power supply from the analog board. 

6. Remove the fish paper from the board. (To do this, 
compress and remove the arrow clips.) 

7. The electrical connection of the fan to the analog 
board has been achieved in several different ways. 
In most designs, one or two wires from the fan are 
soldered to the analog board. First check to see if 
any wires are present. They may be routed along 
the front (Figure 37, #1) or the back (Figure 38, 
#1) of the analog board. 

If there are no fan wires, go to step 8. 

If a wire or wires are present, locate the solder 
point(s) on the back of the board and desolder them. 
Using the exacto knife, cut away any excess 
bonding material holding the wire(s) in place. 



2.38 / Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 







FIGURE 37 




FIGURE 38 

8. Next, locate the two solder points (Figure 38, #2) 
on the back of the board that connect to the fan, and 
desolder if there is solder present. 

9. Remove the four screws (one is shown at Figure 38, 
#3) that hold the fan assembly to the analog board 
and lift the fan off. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Take-Apart / 2.39 



Replace 



1. Orient the new (axial) fan assembly (Figure 39, #1) 
so that the holes in the bracket match the screw 
holes on the analog board. 




FIGURE 39 

2. Holding the fan in place, turn the analog board over 
and install the four mounting screws (one is shown 
in Figure 40, #1). 




FIGURE 40 



2.40 / Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






3. Route the two fan wires through the hole below the 
fan on the analog board (Figure 39, #2). 

Note: This hole was used for the insertion of one of 
the arrow clips that hold the fish paper on the 
board. The arrow clip for this hole can no longer be 
used. 

4. On the noncomponent side of the board, solder the 
black wire to the first lower solder point (Figure 40, 
#2) of connector P3. 

5. On the noncomponent side of the board, solder the 
yellow wire to the fifth lower solder point 
(Figure 40, #3) of connector P3. 

6. Replace the fish paper by reinstalling the arrow 
clips. (Do not put an arrow clip in the hole shown in 
Figure 39, #2.) 

7. Replace the power supply . 

8. Replace the analog board . 

9. Replace the video board . 

CAUTION: The redesigned, vertically mounted video 
board must be installed with the new axial fan. The new 
axial fan will not allow for adequate vibration clearance 
when installed with the old, horizontally mounted video 
board. 



10. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Aug 89 Take-Apart / 2.41 



□ SPEAKER, FRONT BEZEL, AND SLOT COVER 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Exacto knife 
Soldering iron 
Torx screwdriver 



i 



Remove 



Follow the steps below to remove the speaker, slot cover, 
or bezel from a Macintosh SE (only): 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh SE onto a soft, grounded 
workbench pad and put on a grounding wriststrap 
(after discharging the CRT). 

3. Remove the video board and the main logic board . 

4. Remove the analog board . (Do not remove the 
power supply from the analog board.) 

WARNING: The edges of the metal chassis may he 
sharp. Handle the metal chassis carefully. 

5. Remove five Torx screws (Figure 41, #1) and lift 
out the metal chassis with hard disk and/or drive(s). 

6. If you are removing the speaker, use an exacto 
knife to cut away the melted plastic that secures 
two corners of the speaker to the inside of the 
front bezel (Figure 42, #1), and lift the speaker out. 




FIGURE 41 



2.42 / Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 




FIGURE 42 

7. If you are removing the slot cover from a Macintosh 
SE, use an exacto knife to cut away the melted 
plastic that secures two corners of the slot cover to 
the inside of the front bezel (Figure 42, #3). Gently 
push the slot cover through the slot and lift it out. 

8. If you are removing the bezel, first remove the CRT . 



Replace 



Follow the steps below to replace the speaker, slot cover, 
or bezel: 



1. Place the bezel face down on the grounded work- 
bench pad. 

2. If you are replacing the speaker, position the 
speaker in the bezel (see Figure 42). Touch a 
heated soldering iron to the two previously 
unmelted plastic posts that now protrude through 
the corners of the speaker (Figure 42, #2). The 
plastic will spread as it melts, then harden and hold 
the speaker in place. 

3. If you are replacing the slot cover on a Macintosh SE, 
position the slot cover in the bezel (see Figure 42) 
with the plastic LED window beside the small hole on 
the front bezel. Touch a heated soldering iron to the 
two unmelted plastic posts on the slot cover (Figure 
42, #4). The plastic will melt, then harden and hold 
the slot cover in place. 






Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Take-Apart / 2.43 



4. Replace the CRT , if you removed it. 

WARNING: The edges of the metal chassis may be 
sharp. Handle the metal chassis carefully. 

5. Replace the metal chassis, with disk and/or SCSI 
drive(s) attached, and fasten it to the bezel with the 
five Torx screws (Figure 43, #1). 



i 




FIGURE 43 

6. Replace the analog board . 

7. Replace the main logic board . 

8. Replace the video board . 

9. Replace the cover . 



2.44 /Take-Apart 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



4 Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 

Section 3 - Adjustments 



□ CONTENTS 








3.2 


Yoke Adjustments 




3.2 


Introduction 




3.2 


Materials Required 




3.3 


Tilt Adjustment 




3.3 


Centering Ring Adjustment 




3.4 


Video Adjustments 




3.4 


Introduction 




3.4 


Materials Required 




3.5 


Adjustment Procedures 






Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Jan 89 Adjustments / 3.1 



□ YOKE ADJUSTMENTS 



Introduction 



i 



In infrequent cases, you may need to adjust the yoke of 
the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 after you replace 
the CRT. To see if the yoke needs adjusting, turn the 
power on and look at the CRT screen. If the picture is 
tilted, correct it using the tilt adjustment. If the picture 
is off center, use the centering rings adjustment. 

Yoke adjustments are made while standing behind the 
Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30, so you must position 
a mirror so that you can see the screen. Because of the 
high voltage danger, do not try to make live 
adjustments by facing the screen and reaching around 
the computer; you cant see what your hands are going 
to touch. 



Materials Required 



Small Phillips screwdriver 

Safety goggles 

CRT discharge tool 

Soft cloth or foam pad 

Mirror 

Exacto knife 




FIGURE 1 



WARNING: Read the safety precautions in Section 1, 
Basics, before performing adjustments. Failure to follow 
the safety rules could result in serious injury. 






3.2 / Adjustments 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Tilt Adjustment 



1. Put on safety goggles and remove all metal jewelry. 
If you are wearing a grounding wriststrap, remove it. 

2. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . (Refer to 
Section 2, Take- Apart.) 

3. Turn the computer with its back facing you, and 
position the mirror with the CRT screen in the mirror. 

4. Loosen the yoke clamp screw (Figure 1, #1) at the 
top of the CRT neck two or three turns. 

5. Connect the power cord and turn the power on. 

6. Put one hand behind your back and with your other 
hand grasp only the plastic spokes of the yoke 
collar (Figure 1, #2). Rotate the yoke until the top 
and bottom edges of the picture appear parallel with 
the top and bottom edges of the bezel. 

7. Turn the power off, unplug the computer, and 
discharge the CRT again. 

8. Hold the yoke collar in the position you just 
determined in Step 6 and carefully tighten the yoke 
clamp screw just enough so that the yoke cannot 
slip. Do not overtighten. 

9. Replace the cover . 

10. Connect the power cord and turn the power on to 
make sure the tilt adjustment is still correct. 



Centering Ring 
Adjustment 



1. Put on safety goggles and remove all metal jewelry. 
If you are wearing a grounding wriststrap, remove it. 

2. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . (Refer to 
Section 2, Take- Apart.) 

3. Turn the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 so that 
its back is facing you, and position the mirror so 
that the CRT screen is visible in the mirror. 

4. Locate the two centering rings on the yoke assembly 
(Figure 1, #3). The adjustment of these rings 
determines whether the picture is centered or offset 
to one side. 






Note: If a bonding material is holding these rings in 
place, break it using an exacto knife. 

5. Connect the power cord and turn the power on. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



Adjustments / 3.3 



6. Center the picture by first holding the front centering 
ring steady and moving the rear ring, then holding the 
rear ring steady and moving the front ring. 

7. When the picture is perfectly straight and centered, 
turn the power off, remove the power cord, and 
again discharge the CRT. 

8. Replace the CQvgr. 

9. Plug in the power cord, turn the computer power 
on, and view the screen to ensure that the centering 
adjustment is still correct. 



□ VIDEO ADJUSTMENTS 



Introduction 



Video adjustments may be necessary whenever the CRT, 
the analog board, the video board, or the power supply 
is replaced. 



Materials Required 



Safety goggles 

Plastic alignment tool (or "tweaker") 

Mirror 

Ruler 




FIGURE 2 



3.4 / Adjustments 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Adjustment 
Procedures 



Put on safety goggles and remove all metal jewelry. 
If you are wearing a grounding wriststrap, remove 
it. 



2. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 
Section 2, Take- Apart.) 



(Refer to 



Turn the computer with the side of the analog board 
facing you, and position the mirror so that the CRT 
screen is visible in the mirror. 



Brightness and Contrast 



Size Adjustments 



4. Connect the power cord and turn the power on. 

5. Turn the contrast control fully clockwise. (The 
contrast control is on the front of the computer, on 
the left side, under the Apple logo.) 

6. Adjust the brightness control (Figure 2, #1) with 
the alignment tool: turn it fully counterclockwise 
so that white lines are visible on the screen. Then 
turn it back in the opposite direction until the 
white lines just disappear. 

7. Turn the contrast control on the front panel slightly 
counterclockwise. This is the ideal adjustment. 

8. Use the plastic alignment tool to adjust the width 
(Figure 2, #2) until the picture is approximately 
7 inches wide. 



Focus Adjustment 



9. Use the plastic alignment tool to adjust the height 
(Figure 2, #3) until the picture is approximately 
4.7 inches high. 

10. Turn the focus adjustment (Figure 2, #4) all the way 
clockwise until it doesn't turn anymore. Now turn 
it back in the opposite direction (counterclockwise) 
one-eighth of a turn. This setting gives the best 
overall sharpness at all points on the screen. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



Adjustments / 3.5 






I 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 

Section 4 - Diagnostics 

□ CONTENTS 

4.2 Introduction to MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 

4.2 Program Similarities 

4.3 Program Differences 

4.4 Making Backup Disks 

4.4 Copying MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 Disks 

4.6 Running MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 

4.6 Materials Required 

4.6 Starting MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 

4.8 Installing the Loopbacks 

4.9 Using the MacTest SE and S£/30 Menus 
4.14 Running the Tests 

4.16 Introduction to AppleCAT SE and AppleCAT SE/30 

4.17 Running AppleCAT SE and AppleCAT SE/30 
4.17 Materials Required 

4.17 Setting Up Test Station and UUT 

4.20 Establishing Communication 

4.22 Using the AppleCAT Menus 

4.26 Running the Tests 

4.28 Repair Confirmation Codes 

4.29 SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure 

4.29 To Determine If a Jumper Is Needed 

4.30 To Install the Jumper 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Aug 89 



Diagnostics/ 4.1 



□ INTRODUCTION TO MACTEST SE AND MACTEST SE/30 

MacTest™ SE (version 3.0 or higher) is part of the 
AppleCAT™ SE diagnostic set that is used for testing 
Macintosh SE systems. MacTest SE/30 (version 1.0 or 
higher) is part of the AppleCAT SE/30 diagnostic set for 
testing Macintosh SE/30 systems. Both MacTest SE and 
MacTest SE/30 may also be used as standalone 
functional tests of their respective systems. 



i 



Program 
Similarities 



When used as standalone tests, MacTest SE and MacTest 
SE/30 perform pass/fail functional tests of the 
Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 systems, 
respectively. MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 are run 
the same, but MacTest SE/30 tests Macintosh SE/30 
components that do not exist in the Macintosh SE. 



Initially, both MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 allow you 
to select the tests you want to run. As each test 
progresses, messages on the screen indicate which area 
is under test. As soon as a failure is detected, the test 
stops and the screen indicates which module must be 
replaced before the test can be run to completion. The 
test then terminates and returns to the Finder (desktop). 

Both MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 also provide test 
patterns for use in adjusting the CRT. Neither MacTest 
SE nor MacTest SE/30 tests an internal SCSI hard disk 

To test the hard disk, use the Macintosh Hard Disk 
Drive Diagnostic disk (see Section 3, Diagnostics, in 
the SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical Procedures). 






4.2 / Diagnostics 



Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Program 
Differences 



Because of configuration differences between the 
Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 systems (see Basics), 
MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 test different 
components. 



Components Tested 
by MacTest SE 






Components Tested 
by MacTest SE/30 



MacTest SE tests the following Macintosh SE components: 

• Macintosh SE main logic board, including: 

- RAM 

- VIA 

- SCC 

- Clock 

- Sound chip 

• Internal and external disk drives 

• Keyboard and mouse 

• SCSI bus 

• Apple PC 5.25 Drive and Macintosh SE-Bus PC Card 

The internal 96-pin Euro-DIN expansion bus connector 
on the Macintosh SE logic board cannot be tested unless 
an expansion card is connected to the expansion bus. 
When a Macintosh SE-Bus PC Card and an Apple PC 5.25 
Drive are installed, MacTest SE can test the card, drive, 
and expansion bus at the same time. 



MacTest SE/30 tests the following Macintosh SE/30 
components: 

• Macintosh SE/30 main logic board, including: 

- RAM 

- VIA 

- SCC 

- PMMU 

- FPU 

- Clock 

- Sound chip 

• Internal and external disk drives 

• Keyboard and mouse 

• SCSI bus 

• Video RAM 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Aug 89 



Diagnostics / 4.3 



□ MAKING BACKUP DISKS 



Make a backup of the original MacTest SE or MacTest 
SE/30 diagnostic disk before you begin! When testing a 
defective Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30, it is 
possible to damage or erase a section of the MacTest 
disk. 

You can make backup copies on any Macintosh, 

regardless of which MacTest program you are copying. 
For example, you can copy the MacTest SE disk using a 
Macintosh Plus or a Macintosh II. The copy does not 
have to be made on the Macintosh SE. 



Copying 
MacTest SE and 
MacTest SE/30 Disks 



Use Finder to make a backup copy of the MacTest SE 
or MacTest SE/30 diagnostic disk. When copying the 
MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 disk, be sure to copy the 
entire disk and not just the MacTest program. The 
MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 disks contain specific 
versions of the System and Finder, and are not 
guaranteed to run with other versions. Also, be sure to 
copy MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 to 800K disks only. 



Using Your 

Backup 

Disk 



Take the following precautions when using your 
MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 disk copy: 

• Do not write-protect your working copy of the 
MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 disk. The program 
will not run correctly if you do. 

• Do not replace the System or Finder provided on 
the MacTest disk. The versions used on the disk 
are Finder 6.1 and System 6.0.2. MacTest SE and 
MacTest SE/30 are not guaranteed to work with 
other versions of the System and Finder. 






4.4 / Diagnostics 



Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Do not change the name of the diagnostic program on 
the disk. During logic board testing, the machine 
reboots, looks for, and restarts the diagnostic named 
MacTest SE (or MacTest SE/30, if you are testing 
that system). If the name has been changed, the 
startup routine will not be able to locate it, and the 
system will stay on the desktop. 

Therefore, if the MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 
window does not reappear after a logic board test, 
check the name of the diagnostic's icon on the 
desktop. Correct it to MacTest SE (or MacTest 
SE/30), and then select Set Startup from the desktop 
Special menu. When you are asked if you wish to 
change the name of the startup application to 
MacTest SE (or MacTest SE/30), click OK. Then 
double-click on the corrected MacTest SE or 
MacTest SE/30 icon to return to the test program. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 Aug 89 Diagnostics / 4.5 



□ RUNNING MACTEST SE AND MACTEST SE/30 



Materials Required 



MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 diagnostic disk (backup) 

Mini-DIN-8-to-mini-DIN-8 serial port cable 

SCSI loopback test card (modified with jumper — see 

"SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure") 
Blank, 800K disk for drive test 
Blank, 1.4 MB disk for high-density drive test 



i 



Starting 

MacTest SE and 
MacTest SE/30 



You can use MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 to perform a 
functional test of the entire Macintosh SE or Macintosh 
SE/30 system (respectively), or you can use it to test a 
single component in a known-good system. Follow the 
start-up steps below for the testing you wish to perform. 



Testing 

Complete System 
or Logic Board 



1. If you are testing a complete Macintosh SE or 
Macintosh SE/30 system, or if you intend to run the 
logic tests, turn the power off and remove any card 
installed in the expansion slot. 

2. Install the loopback connectors as described under 
"Installing the Loopbacks," later in this section. 

3. Insert the appropriate MacTest disk into the 
internal drive, and power on the system. MacTest 
will display the Start, or Status, window. From the 
Status window, you can click Start to run the tests. 



Testing 

Single 

Component 



If you are testing a single component in a known- 
good system, insert the appropriate MacTest disk 
into the internal drive and switch on system power. 



2. MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 will display a 
window telling you to switch off system power and 
connect the SCSI loopback cable. The SCSI loopback 
cable must be connected only when you are running 
the logic board tests. If you do not need to connect 
the SCSI loopback cable, click OK to get to the 
Status window. 

3. From the Status window, you can use the MacTest 
menus. Go to the Options menu and use the Test 
Selections submenu to select the, tests you want to 
run. Then click Start. For more specific information 
on the tests, see "Using the MacTest SE and SE/30 
Menus" and "Running the Tests," later in this 
section. 



4.6 / Diagnostics 



Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Helpful Startup 
Information 



If you do not know whether the system you are 
testing is good, remove any expansion cards and run 
the logic, drive, and video RAM (Macintosh SE/30 
only) tests. (See "Using the MacTest SE and SE/30 
Menus" and "Running the Tests," later in this 
section.) Complete any needed repairs before you 
continue. 



2. If you removed a non- Apple expansion card from the 
customer's system and the system tests OK, switch 
off system power and replace the card. Then run the 
logic, drive, and video RAM (Macintosh SE/30 only) 
tests again to be sure the card is not interfering 
with the system operation. 

3. If you want to test an Apple PC Card or an Apple PC 
5.25 Drive (Macintosh SE only), run the Apple PC 5.25 
Drive test as described in Section 3, Diagnostics, of 
the Apple PC 5.25 Drive Technical Procedures. 

4. If you encounter any of these problems, try the 
solution that follows each problem: 

• A known-good MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 
disk will not boot: Refer to Section 5, 
Troubleshooting. 

• The Configuration window indicates that an 
attached disk drive is not installed: Check the 
disk drive cables. 

• The Configuration window indicates that the 
wrong amount of RAM is installed: Check SIMM 
placements in the SIMM banks. For a Macintosh 
SE, also check the position of resistors/jumpers 
on the logic board. Refer to Section 6, 
Additional Procedures. 

• The Configuration window indicates that an 
upper internal drive is a lower internal drive 
(or vice versa): Check the installation of the 
internal drive cables. 

• A known-good MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 
disk will not boot: Refer to Section 5, 
Troubleshooting. 






Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Aug 89 



Diagnostics / 4.7 



Installing the 
Loopbacks 



Before beginning Mactest SE or MacTest SE/30, and 
with the power off, connect the serial loopback cable, 
the SCSI loopback card, the keyboard and mouse, and 
the external drive (optional). 

CAUTION: Always power off the system when you 
connect or disconnect the SCSI loopback card 

The SCSI loopback card (Figure 1, #1) must be 
connected to the SCSI port (Figure 1, #2) on the back 
of the system. (No other connections between the card 
and the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 are 
necessary.) To protect the SCSI circuitry, you must 
have the power off when you connect the SCSI card. 

Note: When the SCSI loopback card is connected, 
the internal SCSI hard disk will not be able to 
respond, nor will it be recognized by the system. 

The loopback cable (Figure 1, #3) with the mini DIN-8 
connectors must be installed between the modem and 
printer ports (Figure 1, #4) on the rear of the machine. 




FIGURE 1 



4.8 / Diagnostics 



Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Using the 
MacTest SE and 
SE/30 Menus 



Before you start MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30, you 
may use the MacTest menus to select the tests that 
you want to run or to select other features of the 
diagnostic. You cannot use the menus when the tests 
are running. 



Options Menu 



The Options menu contains the Test Selections and 
Configuration submenus. 



1. Test Selections: The Test Selections windows 
displayed by MacTest SE (Figure 2) and MacTest 
SE/30 (Figure 3) differ slightly, but the process of 
selecting tests is the same for both programs. 



Test Selections 


[3 Logic Board 


Disk Driues: 


® Short OLong 


Q lower 0rii>8 


□ Keyboard 

□ Mouse 


□ Upper Driue 


□ Sound 

D Uideo Monitor Adjustments 


□ External Oriu* 


□ Rppfe$ PC 5.25 l)r*u* ant! Card 




G Loop on selected tests 


i - - ii_ 


|[ OK j ' Cancel ] 


%> f 



FIGURE 2 



Test Selections 


El Logic Board Disk Drioes: 




® Short OLong 13 internal 


QEHternol 


□ Kegboard 




□ Mouse 




□ Uideo Monitor Adjustments 




□ Uideo Ram Test 




□ Loop on selected tests OK 


I [ Cancel ] 



FIGURE 3 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Aug 89 



Diagnostics / 4.9 



Test Selections allows you to select the tests you wish to 
run. To select a test, click in the box next to the name 
of the item to be tested (an X appears). To deselect the 
test, click again in the box (the X disappears). When you 
have selected all the tests you wish, click OK to return 
to the MacTest Status window. 



i 



a) Logic: This test will verify the correct 

functioning of the following circuitry on the 
logic board: 



VIA (Versatile Interface Adaptor) 

SCC (Serial Communications Chip) 

Clock 

SCSI bus 

RAM 

FPU (Floating-Point Unit) (Macintosh SE/30 

only) 

PMMU (Paged Memory Management Unit) 

(Macintosh SE/30 only) 



You may select a short or long logic test. The 
running time of the test will vary depending on 
how much memory is installed. At the beginning 
of the RAM test, MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 
will indicate the maximum running time of the 
test. 

b) Keyboard: This selection activates the keyboard 
self-tests that verify the functioning of the 
keyboard. 

c) Mouse: This selection activates the mouse self- 
tests that verify the functioning of the mouse. 

d) Disk Drives: You may test any or all of the 

drives (except internal or external hard disks): 

• Lower 

• Upper (Macintosh SE only) 

• External 

Note: The diagnostic will not test an external 
disk drive that is connected through a non-SCSI 
Hard Disk 20. 

e) Video RAM (Macintosh SE/30 only): This 
selection tests the 64K of video RAM. Be aware 
that video patterns will flash across your screen 
during this test. 



4.10/ Diagnostics 



Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Video Monitor Adjustments: This selection 

displays test patterns that are used to adjust the 
video picture on the monitor. After making any 
necessary video adjustments, click the mouse or 
hit any key to continue testing or to return to 
the MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 window. 



g) Sound: This option provides two tests that 
verify the proper functioning of the Macintosh 
SE and Macintosh SE/30 sound chip: 

• 8-Level Volume Test: produces 8 tones of 
increasing volume. 

• C Scale: produces a C-major scale. 

h) Apple PC 5.25 Drive (Macintosh SE only): This 
test verifies the correct functioning of the drive, 
the Apple PC Card, and the expansion port on 
the main logic board. To set up for this test, 
follow the instructions in Section 3, Diagnostics, 
of the Apple PC 5.25 Drive Technical Procedures. 

Note: The Apple PC 5.25 Drive test cannot 
always determine which module caused a test to 
fail. If the test reports that the drive and/or 
card is bad, replace one module at a time as 
described in Section 5, Troubleshooting, of the 
Apple PC 5.25 Drive Technical Procedures. 



i) Loop on selected tests: This selection provides a 
continuous running (in sequence) of all selected 
tests. To stop the looping, click Stop between 
tests (that is, when the screen displays an arrow 
rather than a wristwatch). 

Here are a few simple guidelines to keep in 
mind when preparing to perform loop tests: 

• You cannot loop on Video Monitor 
Adjustments. 

• You cannot loop on both the Logic Board and 
Disk Drives tests at the same time. 

• When loop-testing a disk drive with more 
than one possible data format (FDHD), you 
can select only one format to loop on. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Aug 89 



Diagnostics/ 4.11 



Configuration: When Configuration is selected, 
MacTest SE displays the window shown in Figure 4, 
and MacTest SE/30 displays the window shown in 
Figure 5. 



i 



Macintosh SE Configuration 


Memory Size: 


1 MB 


ROM Uersion : 


0300 


Disk Controller: 


SIDIM 


Lower Drive: 


Not Connected 


Upper Dhue: 


1.4 MB 


External Driue: 


Not Connected 


Apple® PC Card: 


Not Installed 






UsJ 



FIGURE 4 



Macintosh SE/30 Configuration 



Memory Size: 
ROM Uersion : 
Internal Driue: 
External Driue: 



2 MB 

Reu 1.3 

1.4 MB 

Not Connected 




FIGURE 5 



The two Configuration windows display slightly different 
information. The MacTest SE window indicates the 
amount of memory in the Macintosh SE, the version 
number of its ROMs, the type of disk controller chip 
installed, its current disk drive configuration, and 
whether or not an Apple PC card is installed. The 
MacTest SE/30 window displays the amount of memory in 
the Macintosh SE/30, the version number of its ROMs, 
and its current disk drive configuration. 






4.12 /Diagnostics 



Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



File Menu 



The File menu displays the following items. (Open and 
Close are dimmed.) 



• Open... 

• Close 

• Save Test Selections 

• Stop 

• Quit 



[Command-0] 

(Dimmed unless a desk 

accessory is open) 

[Command-S] 

[Command-.] 

[Command-Q] 



1. Save Test Selections: Allows you to customize your 
MacTest disk by saving your selection of tests for 
the next time you use MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30. 

2. Stop: Ends the diagnostic and returns to the 
MacTest Status window. 

3. Quit: Returns you to the desktop. 



Apple Menu 



The Apple (#) menu contains the following items. 
(Chooser and Find File are shown, but they are inactive.) 

1 About MacTest™ SE or About MacTest™ SE/30. 

When selected, a dialog box displays the diagnostic 
name, version number, date of release, serial 
number, and a copy-protect statement. 

2. Control Panel. This option allows you to set 
preferences for speaker volume, monitor status, 
mouse tracking, or desktop pattern. 

3. Key Caps. When selected, Key Caps displays a 
window with a keyboard. Press each key on the 
keyboard aTid verify that the display block for the 
key is highlighted. If the key is not highlighted, 
the keyswitch is bad and should be replaced. If 
numerous keys are not highlighted, exchange the 
keyboard. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Aug 89 



Diagnostics/ 4.13 



Running 
the Tests 



After using Test Selections to select the tests you wish 
to run, you are ready to start MacTest SE or 
MacTest SE/30. Click Start in the Status window. 
Please note the following: 

• The Status line at the bottom of the window will 
keep you informed of the tests being performed and 
the test results. 

• While running, all tests display a wristwatch. There 
is no other moving or flashing indicator that tells 
you the test is in progress. 

• When testing the logic board with a SCSI loopback 
card that is missing or improperly installed, testing 
will begin but the SCSI port test will fail. You 
must switch off system power, disconnect all 
external SCSI drives, and connect the SCSI loopback 
card before continuing the test. 

• When testing the logic board, if the serial loopback 
cable is missing or improperly installed, the testing 
will begin but the serial ports test will fail. You 
will be instructed to connect a serial loopback cable 
and then to click OK to retry the failed test. (You 
can connect the serial loopback cable without 
shutting down the system.) 

• The RAM test causes several seconds of startling 
graphics to be displayed on the screen before the 
program reboots to the MacTest Status window. 



i 






4.14/ Diagnostics 



Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



• When testing the FDHD disk drive, you will be 
prompted to insert and remove blank 800K and high- 
density (1.4 MB) disks. Perform the disk swaps as 
directed on the screen, and then click OK. 

Note: It is important to insert the requested low- or 
high-density disk. If the wrong disk is inserted, 
MacTest SE and MacTest SE/30 will indicate that the 
disk drive is malfunctioning when it may not be. 

CAUTION: Do not press the reset or interrupt switch while 
the RAM test is running. Pushing reset causes the RAM 
test to fail, and pressing interrupt may damage the 
MacTest disk. 

• You may halt the testing by clicking Stop or Pause 
anytime between tests (when the cursor is an arrow, 
rather than the wristwatch). 

- Choose Stop to halt the testing and to return to 
the Status window. Choose Start when you wish 
to begin the testing sequence again. 

- Choose Pause if you wish to discontinue testing 
temporarily. Choose Continue to resume the 
tests from the point of interruption. 

Note: Pause, the default option, can also be selected 
during testing by pressing the <Enter> or <Return> 
keys. The program will act upon the Pause command 
when it is between tests. 

Replace any module that the test indicates is faulty (see 
Section 2, Take- Apart). Before replacing the module, 
use AppleCAT.SE or AppleCAT SE/30 (whichever is 
appropriate) or refer to Section 5, Troubleshooting, to 
verify the diagnosis. If the system is still not operating 
properly, turn to Section 5, Troubleshooting, for more 
information. 

If all tests pass, the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 
will return to the Status window. The message All 
selected tests have passed will be displayed on the 
Status line. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 Aug 89 Diagnostics / 4.15 



□ INTRODUCTION TO APPLECAT SE AND APPLECAT SE/30 

AppleCAT™ SE and AppleCAT™ SE/30 are diagnostic 
tools that use a known-good Macintosh to diagnose 
module failures in a defective Macintosh SE or 
Macintosh SE/30, respectively. The machine doing the 
testing, or test station, is connected to the machine 
being tested, or Unit Under Test (UUT), through their 
communication ports. The test station, when booted 
with the AppleCAT SE or AppleCAT SE/30 diagnostic 
program, performs the following functions: 



Establishes communications with the UUT 

Calls tests in the UUT ROM 

Downloads tests to the faulty machine 

Calls tests from the MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 

disk in the UUT disk drive 

Displays test results on the test station screen 

Identifies the failing module 

Prompts the technician for information 

Recommends a repair procedure 

Issues a repair confirmation code (RCC) 



Using AppleCAT SE or AppleCAT SE/30, the machine 
being tested does not have to be fully operational. By 
using an independent, working computer to do the 
diagnosis, the AppleCAT diagnostic programs depend 
very little on the unit under test (UUT), and are more 
reliable and thorough than traditional diagnostic 
methods. 

Standard windows guide the technician through each 
stage of the diagnostic. When the UUT fails a test or 
indicates a problem, an AppleCAT SE or AppleCAT 
SE/30 window will ask for more information or 
recommend a repair. 

After each module replacement or adjustment, AppleCAT 
SE and AppleCAT SE/30 rerun the failed test to verify 
that the problem has been fixed. If the UUT 
successfully completes this final test, the AppleCAT 
programs issue a repair confirmation code (RCC). 






4.16/ Diagnostics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






□ RUNNING APPLECAT SE AND APPLECAT SE/30 



Materials Required 



Known-good Macintosh test station 

Programmer's switch for the UUT 

Mini-DIN-8-to-mini-DIN-8 serial port cable (590-0552) 

SCSI loopback card 

Mini DIN-8 serial loopback plug 

Torx screwdriver 

Macintosh take-apart tool 

CRT discharge tool 

#0 Phillips screwdriver 

#1 Phillips screwdriver 



Macintosh SE 
Materials Required 



Macintosh SE (unit under test or UUT) 
AppleCAT™ SE diagnostic disk 
MacTest™ SE disk (write-protected) 
Blank, 800K disk 
Blank, 1.4 megabyte disk 



Macintosh SE/30 
Materials Required 



Macintosh SF./30 (unit under test or UUT) 
AppleCAT SE/30 diagnostic disk 
MacTest™ SE/30 disk (write-protected) 
Blank, 800K disk 
Blank, 1.4 megabyte disk 



Setting Up 
Test Station 
and UUT 



1. Connect the test station to a wall socket with an 
AC power cord. 

2. Place the UUT next to the test station. 

3. Connect the UUT to a wall socket with an AC power 
cord. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Diagnostics/ 4.17 



CAUTION: Always power off the system when you 
connect or disconnect the SCSI loopback card 

4. Connect the SCSI loopback card to the SCSI port 
(Figure 6, #1) on the UUT. 

5. Connect the serial loopback plug to the printer port 
(Figure 6, #2) on the UUT. 



i 




FIGURE 6 

6. Connect one end of the serial port cable to the 
modem port on the UUT; connect the other end to 
the modem port on the test station (Figure 7). 




TEST 
STRTION 



FIGURE 7 



4.18/ Diagnostics 



rev. Sep 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






7. Connect a keyboard or mouse to the UUT. 

8. Verify that the programmer's switch (Figure 8) is 
installed. With the front of the UUT facing you, 
insert the two short tabs of the programmer's switch 
into the 6th and 7th open slots from the back, along 
the left side of the UUT. Push the switch until it 
snaps into place or you are certain it is secure. 



The programmer's switch has two parts. The front 
part of the switch is a reset switch. Pressing the 
reset switch is just like turning the power switch 
off and back on. The back part of the switch is an 
interrupt switch. Pressing the interrupt switch 
places the UUT in interrupt mode. 




FIGURE 8 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Sep 89 



Diagnostics/ 4.19 



Establishing 
Communication 



2. 



Insert the AppleCAT SE (if testing a Macintosh SE) 
or AppleCAT SE/ 30 (if testing a Macintosh SE/30) 
disk in the test station, and switch on system power. 

Open the disk icon and then the AppleCAT icon. 
The Start, or Status, window will appear on the test 
station screen. 



i 



3. Be sure that all disks are ejected from the UUT. 

4. Switch on system power at the UUT. 

For a Macintosh SE : If the video is normal, the 
Macintosh SE (UUT) will briefly display a blank gray 
screen with an arrow. When this screen appears, 
press the interrupt switch (Figure 9) to enter 
interrupt mode. (You may have to press the 
interrupt switch 3 to 5 times!) When in interrupt 
mode, the UUT can respond to information received 
over the communication port. You will know you are 
in interrupt mode when the screen displays the- "sad 
Macintosh" icon. 

If the UUT screen is completely dark, or if bars or 
stripes are displayed, there may be a problem with 
the video. If the above occurs, wait about 4 seconds 
per megabyte of installed memory, and then press 
the interrupt switch to enter interrupt mode. 




FIGURE 9 



4.20 / Diagnostics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






For a Macintosh SE/^0 : If you hear only the boot tone 
(a single chord), you are not in interrupt mode. To 
get into interrupt mode, wait until an arrow appears 
in the upper-left corner of the UUT (Macintosh SE/30) 
screen (about 4 seconds per megabyte of installed 
memory), and then press the interrupt switch (Figure 
9). When in interrupt mode (test mode), the UUT can 
respond to information received over the 
communication port. 

IMPORTANT: If you hear any additional chords (chimes) 
after the single boot tone, you are already in interrupt/test 
mode. Do not hit the interrupt switch. The Macintosh 
SE/30 will automatically go into interrupt mode if an error 
is detected at power on. 

If the UUT has video problems, the arrow may not be 
visible in the upper-left corner of the screen. If 
there is no arrow, wait about 4 seconds per megabyte 
of installed memory, and then press the interrupt 
switch. 

Note: If a MacTest SE or MacTest SE/30 disk was 
left in the UUT disk drive during power on, the 
MacTest disk may boot before you can press the 
interrupt switch on the UUT. If this happens, eject 
the MacTest disk, power off the UUT, and start over 
at step 4. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Aug 89 Diagnostics / 4.21 



Using the 

AppleCAT 

Menus 



Before you start AppleCAT SE or AppleCAT SE/30, 

you may use the AppleCAT menus to select the tests you 

want to run or to select other features of the diagnostic. 

Note: You must make your test selections from the 
AppleCAT menus before starting AppleCAT SE or 
AppleCAT SE/30. Changes to the test selections cannot 
be made while the AppleCAT test is running. If you do 
not use the Test Selections menu, the default test 
selection will include the following tests: 

• Logic Board 

• Internal Disk Drive (Macintosh SE/30) or 

• Lower Floppy Drive (Macintosh SE) 

IMPORTANT: Selecting specific tests shortens the 
AppleCAT SE/30 test, but selected tests cannot find all 
faulty modules. Only the default test selections will ensure 
a complete system check. 



i 



Options Menu 



The Options menu contains the Test Selections submenu. 
Test Selections allows you to select and run certain 
tests individually. To select a test, click in the box 
next to the name of the item to be tested. The box will 
display an X. To deselect the test, click again in the 
box to remove the X. When you have selected all the 
tests you wish, click OK. You will be returned to the 
Status window. 



Note: Test Selections will remain unchanged until you 
change them or you reboot the AppleCAT SE or 
AppleCAT SE/30 program. 



Test Selections 



13 Logic Board 

□ Uideo Troubleshooting 



Disk Driues: 
[X] Lower Floppg Driue 
G Upper Floppy Driue 



| OK H ( Cancel ] 



FIGURE 10 



4.22 / Diagnostics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Test Selections 

El Logic Board El Internal Floppy Driue 

D Video Troubleshooting 



[[ OK ]] ( Cancel 



FIGURE 11 

The Test Selections submenus for AppleCAT SE 
(Figure 10) and AppleCAT SE/30 (Figure 11) differ 
slightly, but each program includes Logic Board, Video 
Troubleshooting, and Disk Drive tests. 

1. Logic Board: This test verifies the correct 
functioning of the following circuitry on the 
Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 logic boards: 



ROM 

Memory Size (RAM) 

CPU Data Bus and Address Bus 

Parameter RAM 

VIA (Versatile Interface Adaptor) 

Internal Clock 

FPU (Floating Point Unit) (Macintosh SE/30 only) 

Sound Chip (Macintosh SE/30 only) 

SCC (Serial Communications Controller) 

SCSI Bus 

Apple Desktop Bus 

Video RAM (Macintosh SE/30 only) 



Note: Although both AppleCAT programs test the 
SCSI circuitry on the logic board, they do not test 
the internal SCSI hard disk. To test the hard disk, 
use the Macintosh Hard Disk Drive Diagnostic disk 
(see Section 3, Diagnostics, in the SCSI Hard Disk 
Drives Technical Procedures). 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Diagnostics / 4.23 



2. Video Troubleshooting: This test checks the video 
RAM. Be aware that video test patterns are flashed 
on the screen during the test — the patterns do not 
mean your monitor is failing. 



i 



File Menu 



3. Internal Floppy Drives: This test will verify the 
proper functioning of the SWIM/IWM disk 
controller chip, and the upper (Macintosh SE only) 
and lower floppy disk drives. 

Note: Both the Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 
may have high-density disk drives installed. Testing 
a 1.4 MB internal drive requires swapping blank 
disks in the UUT. Refer to "Running the Tests," step 
5, for more information. 

The File menu displays the following items. All are 
dimmed except Stop (during testing) and Quit. 



• Open.. 


[Command-O] 


• Close 


(Dimmed unless a desk 




accessory is open) 


• Save Test Selections 


(Option not available) 


• Stop 


[Command-.] 


• Quit 


[Command-Q] 



1. Stop: Select Stop to end the diagnostic and return 
to the Status window. 

2. Quit: Select Quit to exit the program and return to 
the desktop. 



4.24 / Diagnostics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Apple Menu Both the AppleCAT SE and AppleCAT SE/30 Apple (4) 

menus contain the following desk accessories: 

1. About Diagnostic: When selected, a dialog box 
displays the diagnostic name, version number, date 
of release, serial number, and a copy-protect 
statement. 

2. Control Panel: With this option you can set 
preferences for items such as speaker volume, 
mouse tracking, whether or not AppleTalk is 
connected, and the desktop pattern. 

The following standard desk accessories are available 
either from the AppleCAT SE or from the AppleCAT 
SE/30 Apple (#) menu: 

• Chooser {AppleCAT SE/30 only) 

• Find File (AppleCAT SE only) 

• Scrapbook (AppleCA T SE only) 

• Alarm clock and Calculator (AppleCAT SE only) 



Help The AppleCAT SE/30 Help menu includes a Memory 

Configuration option. Memory Configuration shows all 
possible RAM SIMM configurations for your Macintosh 
SE/30. 

The AppleCAT SE Help menu includes SIMM Jumper 
Setup and SIMM Resistor Setup options for the type of 
logic board in your Macintosh SE (see "Macintosh SE 
SIMM Upgrades" in Section 6, Additional Procedures). 
These selections show all possible RAM SIMM and 
corresponding jumper or resistor configurations for the 
Macintosh SE. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Aug 89 Diagnostics / 4.25 



Running 
the Tests 



After selecting the tests you wish to run using 
Test Selections, you are ready to start AppleCAT SE or 
AppleCAT SE/30. Click Start in the AppleCAT Status 
window. Please note the following: 



I 



1. The Status line at the bottom of the Status window 
will keep you informed of the tests being 
performed and their results. 

Note: If the message Could not establish 

communication appears on the Status line, you may 
have inserted the MacTest disk in the UUT disk 
drive before powering on. If this message appears, 
follow the instructions given in the AppleCAT Status 
window. 

2. AppleCAT SE and AppleCAT SE/30 will interact with 
you throughout each stage of the testing. When the 
UUT fails a test or indicates a problem, the program 
will prompt you for more information or recommend 
a repair. 

Note: When performing disk drive tests on a 
Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 with a 1.4 MB 
drive, you will be required to perform setup steps 
(see step 5). 

3. The program will ask you for information that it 
cannot obtain electronically. The screen will 
display a choice of answers. Select the most 
appropriate answer in each situation. After 
selecting a response, click OK to continue. 

CAUTION: Do not click the OK button until you've 
completed every instruction given on the screen. Failure 
to complete the instructions may misdirect the diagnostic. 



4.26 / Diagnostics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



4. If the UUT is turned off to replace or reinstall a 
module: 

a) Verify that all cables and test fixtures are 
reattached before powering on. 

b) Eject all disks from the UUT, and then switch on 
system power. 

c) Macintosh SE : Wait 9 to 22 seconds, depending 
upon how much memory is installed, and press 
the interrupt switch to enter interrupt mode. 

Macintosh SE/30 : If you do not hear the test 
mode chimes, wait until an arrow appears 
onscreen (about 4 seconds per megabyte of 
RAM), and then press the interrupt switch to get 
into the test mode. 

5. AppleCAT SE and AppleCAT SE/30 will also ask you 
to perform setup steps. When the Setup Required 
window appears, insert the requested disk. After 
inserting the disk, click Done to continue the test. 
AppleCAT will request the following disks: 

• 800K disk (blank and write-enabled) 

• High-density disk (blank and write-enabled; for 
FDHD drive testing only) 

• Write-protected, MacTest SE/30 disk 

6. You may halt the testing by clicking Stop or Pause 
anytime during the tests: 

a) Choose Stop to halt the testing and to return to 
the AppleCAT Status window. Choose Start when 
you wish to begin the testing sequence again 
from the beginning. 

b) Choose Pause if you wish to discontinue testing 
temporarily. Choose Continue to resume testing 
from the point of interruption. 



IMPORTANT: Please read all messages and instructions 
carefully. Do only what the AppleCAT program specifically 
instructs you to do. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Aug 89 Diagnostics / 4.27 



Repair 

Confirmation 

Codes 



If AppleCAT SE and AppleCAT SE/30 find no problems, 
they return to the Status window. The Status line 
will display the message All selected tests pass. 

If AppleCAT SE or AppleCAT SE/30 detects an 
unidentifiable error in the Macintosh SE or Macintosh 
SE/30, it will issue a repair confirmation code (RCC). 
The RCC is an eight-digit information record that 
contains the diagnostic name, the diagnostic version 
number, the replaced module name, and the repair 
sequence the program followed. The RCC should be 
entered on the SRO form that accompanies the returned 
module. 



- 



AppleCAT 
RCCs 



If AppleCAT SE or AppleCAT SE/30 is unable to identify 
the problem with the UUT, AppleCAT will issue an RCC 
beginning with one of the following four-digit prefixes: 

• 19ZZ-xxxx . . for the Macintosh SE 

• 4GZZ-xxxx for the Macintosh SE/30 



Helpful 
Suggestions 



If you receive an RCC with one of the prefixes shown 
above, refer to Section 5, Troubleshooting, for 
information that can help you isolate the problem. Also 
keep in mind that AppleCAT SE and AppleCAT SE/30 are 
unable to identify a system failure if any of the 
following is true: 

• The bad module is failing intermittently. 

• The system configuration changes during the test 
(memory is removed or added, or system power is 
removed). 

• Selected modules are tested; only the default tests 
perform a complete system check. 

• The replacement module itself is bad. 

• You provide inaccurate input to AppleCAT, or set up 
the test station incorrectly. 






4.28 / Diagnostics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






□ SCSI LOOPBACK JUMPER PROCEDURE 



To Determine 
If a Jumper 
Is Needed 



To be used with MacTest SE and AppleCAT SE y and with 
MacTest SE/30 and AppleCAT SE/30, the SCSI loopback 
card must be jumpered between Pin 25 of Jland Pin 14 
of RP1. On new SCSI loopback cards, the jumper has 
been etched into the printed circuit. Only cards with 
the old PCB artwork need the jumper procedure. 

Note: This modification does not interfere with the 
card's use on other Macintosh or Apple II family 
systems, except that to work on Apple II systems, the 
card must be connected to a notched mouse cable. (For 
further information on the notched cable, refer to Hard 
Disk 20SC Technical Procedures, Section 5, "SCSI 
Interface Card.") 



To Identify 
a New Card 



To determine if you have a new card, which will not 
need to be jumpered, look at the back of the card. If 
the jumper is included in the artwork, there will be an 
A instead of double zeros (00) at the end of the part 
number, which is located under the words "APPLE 
COMPUTER" (Figure 12, #1). These new cards do not 
have to be jumpered. 




FIGURE 12 






Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Diagnostics / 4.29 



External 
Jumpers on 
Old Cards 



Some cards with the 00 part number and the old 
artwork were modified with an external jumper 
during the manufacturing process. Therefore, if your 
card has a 00 part number, check to see if it has an 
external jumper from Pin 25 of Jl to Pin 14 of RP1 
(Figure 13, #1). If the card has no external jumper, you 
must install one yourself. 



i 




FIGURE 13 



Summary 



To summarize: 



If # on back 
ends with: 



00 



Do this: 



Nothing 

(Jumper is present in artwork.) 

Check to see if external jumper 
is present. If not, install jumper. 



To Install 
the Jumper 



If you find that the card must be jumpered, solder a 
wire connection between Pin 25 of Jl and Pin 14 of 
RP1, as shown in Figure 13. (The pins are not 
numbered on the board. In the orientation shown in 
Figure 13, Pin 25 is the pin closest to the upper-left 
corner of the card, and Pin 14 is in the middle line of 
pins, closest to the left edge of the card.) 



4.30 / Diagnostics 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



4 Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 

Section 5 - Troubleshooting 



□ CONTENTS 








5.3 


Introduction 




5.3 


General Information 




5.3 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




5.3 


Things to Remember 




5.4 


Symptom Chart 




5.4 


Video Problems 




5.6 


Peripheral Problems 




5.7 


Drive Problems 




5.8 


SCSI Problems 




5.9 


Miscellaneous Problems 




5.10 


Isolating a Faulty Macintosh SE SIMM 




5.12 


Battery Verification 




5.12 


Introduction 




5.12 


Materials Required 




5.12 


Verification Procedure 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 5.1 






□ INTRODUCTION 

General 
Information 



There are three diagnostic tests that you may use to 
troubleshoot a Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 system: 

• AppleCAV™ SE or AppleCAT™ SE/30 

• MacTesf™ SE or MacTest™ SE/30 

• Macintosh Hard Disk Drive Diagnostic 
(version 4.0 or higher) 

Use this troubleshooting section if the diagnostics are 
unable to detect a failure. Read "Symptom Chart," 
"Isolating a Faulty Macintosh SE SIMM," and "Battery 
Verification" before you begin troubleshooting; you will 
need this information to troubleshoot the Macintosh SE 
and Macintosh SE/30 effectively. After repairing the 
system, run the diagnostics to verify system operation. 



How to Use 
the Symptom 
Chart 



Find the symptom that most nearly describes the 
problem, then perform the corrective actions in the 
order listed. If a corrective action does not fix the 
problem, go to the next action. If you replace a module 
and find that the problem remains, reinstall the original 
module before you go on to the next action. 



Things to 
Remember 



1. Read all the safety precautions before removing or 
installing any modules. (See Section 1, Basics.) 

2. Follow all ESD precautions when troubleshooting. 
(See You Oughta Know for more information.) 

3. Perform the CRT discharge procedure before 
removing or installing any modules. (See Section 2, 
Take-Apart.) 

4. Use known-good software. Bad software can 
produce symptoms that appear to be hardware 
problems. 

5. If a non-Apple expansion card is installed, or if an 
Apple expansion card is installed and the Macintosh 
SE or Macintosh SE/30 will not start up, remove the 
expansion card before troubleshooting. When the 
Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 operates correctly 
without the expansion card, replace the card and 
test again. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 5.3 



□ SYMPTOM CHART 



Video Problems Solutions 



i 



Screen is dark; 
audio and drive 
operate 



1. Turn brightness control clockwise. 

2. Check video cable connections. 

3. Replace analog board. 

4. Replace video board. 

5. Replace main logic board. 

6. Replace CRT. 



Screen is bright and 
audio is present, 
but no video 
information is visible 



1. Replace analog board. 

2. Replace video board. 

3. Replace main logic board. 



Screen is completely 
dark and fan is not 
running 



1. Replace power supply. 

2. Replace analog board. 



A single vertical 
line is displayed 



1. Replace analog board. 

2. Replace video board. 

3. Replace main logic board. 

4. Replace CRT. 



A single horizontal 
line is displayed 



1. Replace analog board. 

2. Replace video board. 

3. Replace main logic board. 

4. Replace CRT. 



Vertical bars 
or stripes are 
displayed 



1. Replace main logic board. 

2. Replace analog board. 



• Horizontal bars 
or stripes are 



displayed 



1. Replace main logic board. 

2. Replace analog board. 



5.4 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Video Problems 
(Continued) 


Solutions 


• A white dot is 
displayed in 
center of screen 


1. Verify that the yoke cable is connected 

2. Replace analog board. 

3. Replace CRT. 


• Screen jitters at 
top left and/or 
lower right 


- Replace analog board. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Jan 89 Troubleshooting / 5.5 



Peripheral Problems 



• Cursor does not 
move 



Solutions 



1. 

2. 



3. 






Check mouse connection. 

If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to a 

rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, keyboard 

should be replaced. 

If mouse does not work in any ADB port, replace 

mouse. 

Replace main logic board. 



Cursor moves but 1. 

clicking the mouse 2. 

button has no effect 



Replace mouse. 

Replace main logic board. 



Cannot double-click 
to open an application, 
disk, or server 



1. Remove any multiple system files on the hard 
disk. 

2. Clear parameter RAM. Hold down the 
< Shift >< Option >< Command > keys and select 
Control Panel from the Apple pull-down menu. 
Reset mouse controls. 

3. If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to 
a rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, 
keyboard should be replaced. 

4. If mouse does not work in any ADB port, replace 
mouse. 

5. Replace main logic board. 



No response to any 
key on the keyboard 



1. Check keyboard connection to ADB port. 

2. Replace keyboard cable. 

3. Replace keyboard. 

4. Replace main logic board. 



Known-good 
I mage Writer, or 
Image Writer II 
will not print 



1. Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 
are set correctly. 

2. Replace software with known-good. 

3. Replace printer interface cable. 

4. Replace logic board. 



Known-good 
LaserWriter 
will not print 



1. Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 
are set correctly. 

2. Replace software with known-good. 

3. Refer to the Networks tab in the Apple Technical 
Procedures. 



5.6 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Drive Problems 



Solutions 



Audio and video are 
present, but one 
internal drive 
does not operate 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Replace internal disk drive cable. 

3. Replace internal disk drive. 

4. Replace main logic board. 



• Audio and video are 
present, but neither 
internal drive operates 
(Macintosh SE only) 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Replace main logic board. 



• External drive 
does not operate 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Be sure the external drive is placed on the right 
side of the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30. 

3. Replace external drive. 

4. Replace main logic board. 



• Disk ejects; display 
shows icon with 
blinking "X" 



1. Replace disk with known-good system disk. 

2. Replace disk drive. 

3. Replace main logic board. 



• Unable to insert 
disk all the way 



1. Insert opened paper clip into hole beside the drive. 

2. Power off system and hold mouse button down 
while powering on (to complete eject cycle). 

3. Replace disk drive. 



Will not eject 
disk 



1. Insert opened paper clip into hole beside the drive. 

2. Power off system and hold mouse button down 
while powering on. 

3. Replace disk drive. 



• Internal disk drive 
runs continuously 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Replace disk drive. 

3. Replace main logic board. 

4. Replace disk drive cable. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Troubleshooting / 5.7 



SCSI Problems 



Internal or external 
hard disk will not 
operate 



Solutions 



1. Verify that SCSI loopback card is not attached. 

2. Replace hard disk. 

3. Replace main logic board. 

4. Replace hard disk drive cable. 



I 



Works with internal or 
external SCSI device 
but will not work with 
both 



1. Verify SCSI device switch setting on the 
external device. 

2. Replace terminator on the external device. 

3. Verify terminator is installed on the internal 
SCSI drive. 

4. Replace SCSI device select cable. 






5.8 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Miscellaneous Problems Solutions 



Clicking, chirping, 
or thumping sound 


l. 
2. 

4. 


Verify analog board cable is connected at J12 on the 

logic board. 

Replace power supply. 

Replace analog board. 

Replace logic board. 


Smoke/odor 


1. 

2> 


Replace power supply. 
Replace analog board. 


No video, no audio, 
and no drive operation 


1 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 


Connect power cord. 
Turn power on. 
Replace power cord. 
Replace power supply. 
Replace analog board. 
Replace main logic board. 


"Sad Macintosh" icon 


1. 
2. 


Replace bad diskette. 

Replace SIMM(s) if code matches any of those given 



in "Isolating a Faulty SIMM" chart. 

3. Verify that three-pin jumper on logic board is 
configured correctly for system RAM (Macintosh SE 
only). See "Macintosh SE SIMM Upgrades." 

4. Replace logic board. 



"Sad Macintosh" icon 
and black vertical 
line are displayed; 
screeching sound 



1. Verify that three-pin jumper on logic board is 
configured correctly for system RAM (Macintosh SE 
only). See "Macintosh SE SIMM Upgrades." 

2. Replace logic board. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



Troubleshooting / 5.9 



□ ISOLATING A FAULTY MACINTOSH SE SIMM 



When the Macintosh SE is powered on, the ROM runs a 
series of logic board tests. Failure of any of these tests 
results in the display of a "Sad Macintosh" icon on the 
screen of the Macintosh SE (only). The icon is shown 
with two rows of eight-digit numbers that indicate the 
particular fault identified by the test. 

Numbers representing SIMM faults in a Macintosh SE are 
grouped below by first-row codes. The paired XXs in the 
lower rows indicate the presence of any number other 
than in either or both of the two positions. Identify 
the SIMM socket number for the type of logic board in 
your Macintosh SE, and replace the faulty SIMM. 

IMPORTANT: The Macintosh SE has both solder-type 
and jumper-type logic boards. To correctly locate the 
SIMM socket with the faulty SIMM, you first must identify 
the type of logic board in your Macintosh SE. Refer to 
Additional Procedures, "SIMM Upgrades. " ., 



Code 



Solder Type 



Jumper Type 



0000000E 

ooooooxx 



SIMM # 1 



SIMM # 3 



0000000E 
00XX00XX 



SIMM # 1 



SIMM # 3 



0000000E 
0000XX00 



SIMM # 2 



SIMM # 4 



0000000E 
XX00XX00 



SIMM # 2 



SIMM # 4 



00000002 
OOOOOOXX 



SIMM # 1 



SIMM # 3 



00000002 
00XX00XX 



SIMM # 1 



SIMM # 3 



00000002 
0000XX00 



SIMM # 2 



SIMM # 4 



00000002 
XX00XX00 



SIMM # 2 



SIMM # 4 



5.10 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Code 

00000003 

ooooooxx 



Solder Type 

SIMM # 1 



Jumper Type 

SIMM # 3 



00000003 
00XX00XX 

00000003 

ooooxxoo 



SIMM # 1 



SIMM # 2 



SIMM # 3 



SIMM # 4 



00000003 

xxooxxoo 



SIMM # 2 



SIMM # 4 



00000004 
OOOOOOXX 

00000004 

ooxxooxx 

00000004 

ooooxxoo 

00000004 

xxooxxoo 



SIMM # 3 



SIMM # 3 



SIMM # 4 



SIMM # 4 



SIMM # 1 



SIMM # 1 



SIMM # 2 



SIMM # 2 



00000005 
OOOOOOXX 



SIMM # 3 



SIMM # 1 



00000005 
OOXXOOXX 



SIMM # 3 



SIMM # 1 



00000005 
OOOOXXOO 



SIMM # 4 



SIMM # 2 



00000005 
XXOOXXOO 



SIMM # 4 



SIMM # 2 



Atote; With some SIMM faults, the "Sad Macintosh" 
display may not be entirely readable. In such cases, 
press the reset/interrupt switch. The code may flash 
very quickly before the machine attempts to reboot. An 
unreadable code often indicates a fault with the SIMM 
at position 3 or 4; so if you cannot find a way to read 
the code, try replacing these two SIMMs, one at a time. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



Troubleshooting / 5.11 



□ BATTERY VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



i 



The Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 logic boards 
each have a long-life lithium battery. Use the following 
procedure to check battery operation. If the battery 
falls below specifications, it must be replaced. Refer to 
Additional Procedures for replacement information. 

WARNING: Lithium batteries, the type used in the 
Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30, have some potential 
for explosion if improperly handled. Follow the procedure 
below exactly as written. 



Materials Required 



Voltmeter 



Verification 
Procedure 



To check the lithium battery with a voltmeter: 

1. Be sure the power is off. Then remove the logic 
board from the Macintosh SE or Macintosh SE/30 . 

2. Locate the lithium battery. Figure 1, #1 shows the 
location of the battery on a Macintosh SE logic 
board; Figure 2, #1 shows the battery location on a 
Macintosh SE/30 logic board. 




FIGURE 1 



5.12 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



3. Set the voltmeter range to measure 10 volts DC. 

Note: The battery in the Macintosh SE/30, and in all 
Macintosh SEs sold after August 1989, is installed in 
a plastic battery holder. It may be necessary to 
remove the battery holder cover (Macintosh SE/30 
only) (Figure 2, #1) and pull out the battery by hand 
to measure battery voltage. 

4. Touch and hold the positive probe of the voltmeter 
to the positive side of the battery. The positive 
side of the battery is marked "+" on the logic board. 

5. Touch and hold the ground probe of the voltmeter to 
the negative side of the battery. 

6. The reading for a good battery should be above 2.8 
volts. 

If the battery voltage is below 2.8 volts, replace the 
battery. To replace the Macintosh SE battery, refer 
to Section 6, Additional Procedures. 



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FIGURE 2 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Aug 89 



Troubleshooting / 5.13 



« Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 

Section 6 - Additional Procedures 



□ CONTENTS 








6.3 


Battery Replacement 




6.3 


Introduction 




6.4 


Battery Identification 




6.5 


Replacing Soldered Batteries (SE only) 




6.7 


Replacing Batteries in Battery Holders 




6.8 


SIMM Identification 




6.8 


Speed 




6.8 


1 MB SIMMs 




6.9 


256K SIMMs 




6.10 


Macintosh SE SIMM Upgrades 




6.10 


RAM Configurations 




6.11 


SIMM Arrangements 




6.12 


Logic Board Identification 




6.14 


Solder-Type Logic Board 




6.15 


Solder-Type Upgrades 




6.17 


Jumper-Type Logic Board 




6.18 


Jumper-Type Upgrades 




6.20 


Macintosh SE/30 SIMM Upgrades 




6.20 


RAM Configurations 




6.20 


SIMM Arrangements 




6.21 


SIMM Upgrades 




6.24 


Macintosh SE Chassis Tab Modification 




6.24 


Introduction 




6.24 


Modification Procedure 




6.25 


Chassis Assembly 




6.25 


Introduction 




6.25 


Assembly Procedure 




6.26 


Macintosh SE/30 Logic Board Upgrade 




6.26 


Introduction 




6.26 


Installation 




6.29 


FDHD Upgrade for the Macintosh SE 




6.29 


Introduction 




6.29 


Materials Required 




6.29 


Upgrade Procedure 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Nov 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.1 



□ BATTERY REPLACEMENT 

Introduction Lithium thionyl chloride batteries, the type used in the 

Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30, have some potential 
for explosion if improperly handled. The following 
precautions should be taken when storing, handling, or 
disposing of lithium batteries. 

• Lithium batteries should be stored in a designated, 
well-marked area with limited access. 

• Apple's lithium batteries are sealed in individual 
zip-lock wrappers. Upon receipt, the batteries 
should be inspected for integrity of their wrappers, 
and should be stored in the same packaging in which 
they were received. 

• Lithium batteries cannot be recharged. Do not 
attempt to recharge the battery. Doing so may cause 
the battery to overheat or explode. 

• Do not allow the leads or terminals to short-circuit. 
A short-circuited battery may overheat or explode. 

• Replace the battery with the correct Apple 
replacement battery only. Using an incorrect battery 
or a non-Apple battery may cause the battery to 
overheat or explode. 

• When installing the battery, ensure the correct 
polarity. The polarity markings on the battery must 
match those on the battery holder or circuit board. 
Failure to observe correct polarity may cause the 
battery to overheat or explode. 

• If the battery holder was provided with a cover, be 
sure to replace the cover. 

• If the dead battery has leads, remove them before 
disposing of the battery. 

• Do not dispose of the battery in a fire or incinerator. 
Doing so may cause the battery to explode. 

• In addition to its explosive potential, lithium is 
water reactive and must be disposed of as a 
hazardous waste, as follows: 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Nov 90 Additional Procedures / 6.3 



After removing a "dead" battery from the board, clip 
off its lead wires (necessary only for batteries that 
have been unsoldered from a Macintosh SE logic 
board), and place the battery into the zip-lock 
wrapper and packaging from which the replacement 
battery was taken. Mark the battery DEAD and 
return it to Apple, where it will be disposed of 
following EPA guidelines. Exception : If the battery 
is physically damaged (for example, it's leaking), do 
not return it to Apple; dispose of the battery locally 
according to your local ordinances. 

The long-life lithium battery in the Macintosh SE and 
Macintosh SE/30 should serve many years. Refer to 
Section 5, Troubleshooting, to check the condition of 
the battery. If the battery should fail for some reason, 
replace it according to the following procedure. 



Battery 
Identification 



The Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 contain a single 
long-life lithium battery. In the Macintosh SE, this 
battery is either soldered to the logic board or 
installed in a plastic battery holder. In the Macintosh 
SE/30, the battery is always installed in a battery 
holder. 



If a soldered battery fails, replace it using the 
"Replacing Soldered Batteries (SE only)" procedure. 
Replace all other batteries using the "Replacing 
Batteries in Battery Holders" procedure. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench and wriststrap 

CAUTION: Use ESD precautions before removing or 
replacing the battery. Failure to do so may result in logic 
board failure. 



6.4 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Nov 90 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Replacing 
Soldered Batteries 
(SE only) 



To replace a bad battery that has been soldered to a 
Macintosh SE logic board: 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

WARNING: Never put on your grounding wriststrap until 
after the CRT has been discharged. 

2. Move the Macintosh SE onto a soft, grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. 

3. Remove the main logic board and place it on the 
grounded workbench pad. 




FIGURE 1 

4. Using wire clippers, cut the leads (Figure 1, #1) at 
both ends of the battery to free it from the main 
logic board. Cut the leads as close to the logic 
board as you can without touching the board with 
the clippers. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Nov 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.5 




FIGURE 2 




FIGURE 3 

5. Orient the new battery so that the end marked M +" 
matches the "+" on the main logic board (Figure 2). 
Insert the battery leads into the extra set of 
mounting holes (Figure 3, # 1) on the logic board 
(just inside the original mounting holes). Make 
sure the leads go all the way through the logic 
board to the other side. 

6. Holding the battery in place, turn the logic board 
over and touch a soldering iron to the two new 
battery leads protruding through the inner mounting 
holes. 

Note: It is not necessary to desolder the remains of 
the old leads from the outer mounting holes. 

7. Replace the main logic board and the cover . 

8. Trim the leads of the old battery, package and label 
it as directed in the introduction to this procedure, 
and return the battery to Apple for proper disposal. 



6.6 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Nov 90 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Replacing 
Batteries in 
Battery Holders 



To replace a bad battery that has been installed in a 
plastic battery holder on either a Macintosh SE or 
Macintosh SE/30 logic board: 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

WARNING: Never put on your grounding wriststrap until 
after the CRT has been discharged. 

2. Move the computer onto a soft, grounded workbench 
pad and put on your grounding wriststrap. 

3. Remove the main logic board and place it on the 
grounded workbench pad . 

4. Remove the plastic cover (Macintosh SE/30 only) 
(Figure 4, #1) and pull the battery out of the battery 
holder (Figure 4, #2). 

5. Orient the new battery so that the end marked "+" 
matches the "+" on the main logic board (Figure 2). 
Insert the battery in the battery holder (Figure 4, 
#2) and (if necessary) replace the plastic cover 
(Figure 4, #1). 

6. Replace the main logic board and the cover . 

7. Package and label the old battery as directed in the 
introduction to this procedure, and return the 
battery to Apple for proper disposal. 







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FIGURE 4 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Nov 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.7 



G SIMM IDENTIFICATION 



Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs) for the 
Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 are available with 
two sizes of RAM — 256K and 1 MB — and come in 
several configurations that can be used interchangeably. 

CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to damage from 
ESP and skin acid. Handle only by the edges! 



Speed 



You must use 150 ns (or faster) SIMMs on the 
Macintosh SE and 120 ns (or faster) SIMMs on the 
Macintosh SE/30. SIMMs with a slower rating than 
those specified will cause serious timing problems. The 
RAM speed is usually indicated by the -xx number after 
the manufacturer's part number. For example, -15 
indicates 150 ns SIMMs and -12 indicates 120 ns 
SIMMs. 



1 MB SIMMs 



The 1 MB SIMMs come in two configurations: 



1 MB SOJ SIMM (Figure 5, #1) 
The 1 MB SOJ (Single Out-line J-Lead) SIMM 
contains eight surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has ten 
pins (or legs) on each of two sides. 

1 MB DIP SIMM (Figure 5, #2) 

The 1 MB DIP (Dual In-line Package) SIMM contains 
eight ICs mounted through the printed circuit board. 
Each IC has nine pins (or legs) on each of two sides. 



jnp° 





mnmnmnnnnnmnnnmnnnnnnnnnn 



FIGURE 5 



6.8 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






256K SIMMs 



The 256K SIMMs come in several configurations: 

• 256K SOJ SIMM (Figure 6, #1) 

The 256K SOJ (Single Out-line J-Lead) SIMM contains 
two surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has ten pins (or 
legs) on each of two sides. 



256K DIP SIMM (Figure 6, #2) 

The 256K DIP (Dual In-line Package) SIMM contains 
two ICs mounted through the printed circuit board. 
Each IC has ten pins (or legs) on each of two sides. 

256K PLCC SIMM (Figure 6, #3) 
The 256K PLCC (Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier) SIMM 
contains eight surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has five 
pins (or legs) on each of two sides and four pins on 
each of the other two sides. 



256K DIP SIMM (Figure 6, #4) 
This DIP SIMxM contains eight ICs. 
eight pins on each of two sides. 



Each IC has 



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FIGURE 6 






Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 90 



Additional Procedures / 6.9 



□ MACINTOSH SE SIMM UPGRADES 



RAM memory for the Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 
is installed on Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs). 
When performing SIMM upgrades, keep in mind that the 
Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 contain completely 
different CPUs, and the upgrade procedures are 
different. If you are ugrading a Macintosh SE/30, refer 
to "Macintosh SE/30 SIMM Upgrades" later in this 
section. Steps for upgrading a Macintosh SE follow. 

IMPORTANT: When performing SIMM upgrades, it is 
important to remember that there are two configurations of 
the Macintosh SE logic board, and that the upgrade 
procedure is different for each configuration. See "Logic 
Board Identification" for more information. 

Note: When removing SIMMs from the logic board, use 
the SIMM removal tool. Instructions are in You Oughta 
Know. 



RAM The Macintosh SE can be configured with 1 MB, 2 MB, 

Configurations 2.5 MB, or 4 MB of RAM installed on the logic board. 

Because there are two different versions of the 
Macintosh SE logic board, and several configurations of 
the 256K and 1 MB SIMMs, system expansion must 
follow strict guidelines. The memory upgrade 
guidelines that follow will enable you to identify and 
modify your version of the Macintosh SE logic board 
and install SIMMs correctly on the board. 



i 



* 



6.10 / Additional Procedures rev. Jul 89 Macintosh SE and SE/30 






SIMM 
Arrangements 



The Macintosh SE logic board has four SIMM sockets 
(Figure 7, #1), labeled 1, 2, 3, and 4. These sockets are 
arranged in two rows: SIMM 1 and SIMM 2 are paired 
together in one row, and SIMM 3 and SIMM 4 together 
form the other row. Rows can have either two 25 6K 
SIMMS or two 1M SIMMS installed. 



Note: The oversized 256K and 1M DIP SIMMs 
should be installed in SIMM sockets 3 and 4 only. 

DIP SIMMs installed in SIMM sockets 1 and 2 may 
interfere with the installation of cards in the 
expansion connector (Figure 7, #2). 




FIGURE 7 






Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



Additional Procedures / 6.1 1 



Logic Board 
Identification 



Because the upgrade procedure is different for the 
solder-type and jumper-type versions of the Macintosh 
SE logic board, you must first identify the type of logic 
board you are upgrading: 



i 



Solder-type logic board — Locate the area on the 
logic board identified by Figure 8, #1. On one 
version of the Macintosh SE logic board the area is 
labeled "RAM SIZE," and may have a R35 or R36 
resistor (Figure 8, #2) soldered to the logic board. 
Refer to "Macintosh SE Solder-Type Logic Boards" 
for more information. 






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FIGURE 8 






6.12 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Jumper-type logic board — The other version of the 
Macintosh SE logic board has a three-pin jumper 
block at the area on the logic board identified by 
Figure 9, #1. The jumper block is labelled "2/4M 
1M" on the logic board. Refer to "Jumper-Type 
Logic Boards" for more information on this version 
of the Macintosh SE logic board. 



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FIGURE 9 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



Additional Procedures / 6.13 



Solder-Type 
Logic Board 



Upgrading the system RAM may require making changes 
to the logic board. Locate the area of the logic board 
labeled RAM SIZE. The location of two resistors in this 
area, or the absence of these resistors, tells the 
Macintosh SE important information about what kind of 
SIMMs and how many are installed on the logic board. 



i 



1 -Megabyte 
Configuration 



The standard 1-megabyte RAM configuration consists 
of four 256K SIMMs installed in both rows on the 
Macintosh SE logic board. The presence of resistor R35 
(marked "256K BIT") — soldered to the logic board as 
shown in Figure 10, #1 — tells your computer that 256K 
SIMMs are installed in both rows on the logic board. 
You will need to cut or remove resistor R35 to upgrade 
computer RAM; computers configured with 1 MB of 
RAM can be upgraded to 2.5 MB and 4 MB. 



2-Megabyte 
Configuration 



The standard 2 MB configuration has two 1 MB SIMMs 
installed in the first row (SIMM sockets 1 and 2) on the 
logic board. The presence of resistor 36 (marked "ONE 
ROW") — soldered to the logic board as shown in Figure 
10, #2 — tells your computer that only one row of 1 MB 
SIMMs is installed on the logic board. If you are adding 
a second row of SIMMS to the logic board, resistor R36 
must be cut or removed. 



2.5-Megabyte 
Configuration 



A Macintosh SE can be configured with 2.5 MB of RAM by 
installing two 1 MB SIMMs in the first row (SIMM 
sockets 1 and 2), and two 256K SIMMs in the second row 
(SIMM sockets 3 and 4) on the logic board. Both the R35 
and R36 resistors must be cut or removed to upgrade a 
Macintosh SE to 2.5 MB of RAM. 



4-Megabyte 
Configuration 



A Macintosh SE can be configured with 4 MB of RAM by 
installing a 1 MB SIMM in each of the four SIMM sockets 
on the logic board. The R35 and R36 resistors must be 
cut or removed to upgrade to 4 MB. 



6.14 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






RAM SIZE 




RAM SIZE 



R36 




FIGURE 10 



Solder-Type 
Upgrades 



Follow the procedure below to expand a 1 -megabyte 
Macintosh SE (with the solder-type logic board) to 2.5 or 
4 megabytes, or to expand the 2 MB configuration to 2.5 
or 4 megabytes. (For detailed take-apart, CRT 
discharge, and module installation instructions, see 
Section 2, Take- Apart.) 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh SE onto a soft, grounded 
workbench pad, and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never put on a grounding wriststrap 
until after the CRT has been discharged.) 

3. Remove the main logic board and place it on the 
grounded workbench pad . 

4. If you are adding memory to a computer with 1 
megabyte of RAM, perform the following steps: 

a) Locate resistor R35, marked "256K BIT" 
(Figure 10, #1). Using small diagonal cutters, 
clip the resistor off the board and discard it. 
(You do not need to desolder the leads from the 
board.) 

b) Perform the steps that follow for the upgrade 
you are making: 

Note: When removing SIMMs, use the SIMM 
removal tool. See You Oughta Know for SIMM 
tool instructions. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jul 89 



Additional Procedures / 6.15 



To 2.5 megabytes: Remove the two 256K SIMMS 
from positions 1 and 2, and install two 1 MB 
SIMMs in those positions. Leave the two 256K 
SIMMs in positions 3 and 4. Place the removed 
256K SIMMs in an antistatic bag, and return 
them to the customer. 

To 4 megabytes: Remove the four 256K SIMMS, 
and install four 1 MB SIMMs. Place the removed 
256K SIMMs in an antistatic bag, and return 
them to the customer. 



RAM SIZE 




FIGURE 11 

5. If you are upgrading a 2-megabyte computer, 
perform the following steps: 

a) Locate resistor R36, marked "ONE ROW" 
(Figure 11, #1). Using small diagonal cutters, 
clip the resistor off the board and discard it. 
(You do not need to desolder the leads from the 
board.) 

b) Perform the steps that follow for the upgrade 
you are making: 

To 2.5 megabytes: Add two 256K SIMMS to 
positions 3 and 4. 

To 4 megabytes: Add two 1 MB SIMMs to 
positions 3 and 4. 

6. Replace the main logic board, and replace the cover . 



6.1 6 / Additional Procedures rev. Jul 89 Macintosh SE and SE/30 






Jumper-Type 
Logic Board 



Changes to the logic board must be made for some RAM 
configurations. Locate the three-pin jumper block on 
the logic board (Figure 12). The presence or position 
of a jumper between terminals on the jumper block 
tells the Macintosh what kind of SIMMs, and how many 
rows of SIMMS, are installed on the logic board. 



1 -Megabyte 
Configuration 



The standard 1-megabyte RAM configuration consists 
of four 256K SIMMs installed in both rows on the 
Macintosh SE logic board. The jumper that is installed 
on the jumper block terminals labeled M 1M" (Figure 12, 
#1) tells the Macintosh that you have 1 MB of RAM 
installed on the logic board. You will need to remove 
this jumper to upgrade computer RAM; computers 
configured with 1 MB of RAM can be upgraded to 
2.5 MB and 4 MB. 



2-Megabyte 
Configuration 



The standard 2 MB configuration has two 1 MB SIMMs 
installed in the second row (SIMM sockets 3 and 4) on the 
logic board. The jumper that is installed on the jumper 
block terminals labeled "2/4M" (Figure 12, #2) tells the 
Macintosh SE that you have 2 MB of RAM installed on the 
logic board. If you are adding a second row of SIMMS to 
the logic board, you must remove this jumper. 



2.5-Megabyte 
Configuration 



A Macintosh SE configured with 2.5 MB of RAM has two 
1 MB SIMMs installed in the second row (SIMM sockets 
3 and 4), and two 256K SIMMs installed in the first row 
(SIMM sockets 1 and 2) on the logic board. The jumper 
must be completely removed to upgrade a Macintosh SE 
to 2.5 MB (Figure 12, #3). 




2/4M 1M 




2/4M 1M 




2/4M 1M 



FIGURE 12 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



Additional Procedures / 6.17 



4-Megabyte 
Configuration 



A Macintosh SE configured with 4 MB of RAM has a 1 MB 
SIMM installed in each of the four SIMM sockets on the 
logic board. Again, the jumper must be completely 
removed (Figure 13, #1). 



i 



Jumper-Type 
Upgrades 



Follow the procedure below to expand a 1 MB 
Macintosh SE (with the jumper-type logic board) to 2.5 
or 4 megabytes, or to expand the 2 MB configuration to 
2.5 or 4 megabytes. (For detailed take-apart, CRT 
discharge, and module installation instructions, see 
Section 2, Take- Apart.) 



Materials Required 



Needlenose pliers 



Upgrade 
Procedure 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh SE onto a soft, grounded work- 
bench pad and put on your grounding wriststrap. 
(Never do this until after discharging the CRT.) 

3. Remove the main logic board and place it on the 
grounded workbench pad . 

IMPORTANT: The Macintosh SE will not recognize that it 
has been upgraded to 2.5 or 4 megabytes unless the 
jumper is removed in step 4 or 5. When upgrading to 2,5 
or 4 megabytes, be sure to completely remove the logic 
board jumper. Also note that the AppleCAT SE diagnostic 
cannot detect this configuration problem. 



4. If you are adding memory to a Macintosh SE with 1 
megabyte of RAM, perform the following steps: 

a) Locate the jumper (Figure 13, #2). Using pliers, 
completely remove the jumper from the three-pin 
jumper block. 






6.18 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 









2/4M 1M 



2/4M m 



2/4M 1M 



FIGURE 13 



b) Perform the steps that follow for your upgrade: 

Note: When removing SIMMs, use the SIMM 
removal tool. See You Oughta Know for SIMM 
tool instructions. 

To 2.5 megabytes: Remove the two 256K SIMMS 
from positions 3 and 4, and install two 1 MB 
SIMMs in those positions. Leave the two 25 6K 
SIMMs in positions 1 and 2. Place the removed 
256K SIMMs in an antistatic bag, and return 
them to the customer. 

To 4 megabytes: Remove the four 256K SIMMS, 
and install four 1 MB SIMMs. Place the removed 
256K SIMMs in an antistatic bag, and return 
them to the customer. 

5. If you are upgrading a 2-megabyte Macintosh SE, 
perform the following steps: 

a) Locate the jumper (Figure 13, #3). Using pliers, 
completely remove the jumper from the three-pin 
jumper block. 

b) Perform the steps that follow for your upgrade: 

To 2.5 megabytes: Add two 256K SIMMS to 
SIMM sockets 1 and 2. 

To 4 megabytes: Add two 1 MB SIMMs to SIMM 
sockets 1 and 2. 

6. Replace the main logic board, and replace the cover . 






Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jul 89 



Additional Procedures / 6.19 



□ MACINTOSH SE/30 SIMM UPGRADES 



RAM 
Configurations 



i 



The Macintosh SE/30 can be configured with 1 MB, 2 MB, 
4 MB, 5 MB, or 8 MB of RAM memory. The redesigned 
Macintosh SE/30 logic board has 8 SIMM sockets, and 
can use several types of 256K and 1 MB, 120- 
nanosecond SIMMs. 



SIMM 
Arrangements 



The 8 SIMM sockets on the Macintosh SE/30 logic board 
are arranged in two banks. Bank A (Figure 14, #1) 
includes the four SIMM sockets nearest the edge of the 
board (labeled "SIMl" and "SIM2" on the logic board). 
Bank B (Figure 14, #2) includes the four innermost 
SIMM sockets (labelled "SIM3" and "SIM4" on the logic 
board). 



There are four guidelines to keep in mind whenever 
you upgrade a Macintosh SE/30: 

• Each bank must either be filled with four like 
SIMMs (four 256K SIMMS, or four 1 MB SIMMS) or 
left empty. 

• Bank A must be used (filled with SIMMs) first. 

• If SIMMs of different memory capacity are used, the 
higher capacity (1 MB) SIMMs should always fill 
Bank A, with the lower capacity (256K) SIMMs in 
Bank B. 

• The oversized 256K and 1 MB DIP SIMMs should be 
installed in Bank A only. 



6.20 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



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FIGURE 14 



SIMM 
Upgrades 



You can upgrade a standard Macintosh SE/30 (1 or 
4 megabytes of RAM) to one of these configurations: 



RAM 



Bank A 



2 


MB 


Four 


256K SIMMs 


5 MB 


Four 


1 MB 


SIMMs 


8 


MB 


Four 


1 MB 


SIMMs 



BankB 

Four 256K SIMMs 
Four 256K SIMMs 
Four 1 MB SIMMs 






To perform this procedure, find the RAM upgrade you 
are making, and follow steps that are appropriate for 
the current RAM configuration of your Macintosh SE/30. 
(For detailed take-apart, CRT discharge, and module 
installation instructions, see Section 2, Take-Apart.) 

Note: Whenever you are removing SIMMs, use the 
SIMM removal tool. See You Oughta Know for SIMM 
tool instructions. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jul 89 



Additional Procedures / 6.21 



2MB 
Upgrade 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh SE/30 onto a soft, grounded 
workbench pad, and put on your grounding 
wriststrap — but never put on the grounding 
wriststrap until after you have discharged the CRT. 

3. Remove the main logic board and place it on the 
grounded workbench pad . 



CAUTION: Oversized 256K DIP SIMMs should not be 
installed in Bank B. 



4. Install four 256K SIMMs in Bank B (Figure 15, #2). 

5. Replace the main logic board, and replace the cover . 



5MB 
Upgrade 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh SE/30 onto a soft, grounded 
workbench pad, and put on your grounding 
wriststrap — but never put on the grounding 
wriststrap until after you have discharged the CRT. 




, , ^ ® zzJr^ % m ® lmM mm ; 

[ill 

Joll 




FIGURE 15 



6.22 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



3. Remove the main logic board and place it on the 
grounded workbench pad . 

CAUTION: Oversized 256K DIP SIMMs should not be 
installed in Bank B. 

4. If the Macintosh SE/30 has 1 megabyte of RAM: 

a) Remove four 25 6K SIMMs from Bank A 
(Figure 15, #1) and install them in Bank B 
(Figure 15, #2). 

b) Install four 1 MB SIMMs in Bank A. 

5. If the Macintosh SE/30 has 4 megabytes of RAM, 

install four 25 6K SIMMs in Bank B (Figure 15, #2). 

6. Replace the main logic board, and replace the cover . 



8 MB 1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

Upgrade 

2. Move the Macintosh SE/30 onto a soft, grounded 
workbench pad, and put on your grounding 
wriststrap — but never put on the grounding 
wriststrap until after you have discharged the CRT. 

3. Remove the main logic board and place it on the 
grounded workbench pad . 

CAUTION: Oversized 1 MB DIP SIMMs should not be 
installed in Bank B. 

4. If the Macintosh SE/30 has 1 megabyte of RAM: 

a) Remove the four 25 6K SIMMs from Bank A 
(Figure 15, #1), place them in an antistatic bag, 
and return them to the customer. 

b) Install eight 1 MB SIMMs in Banks A and B. 

5. If the Macintosh SE/30 has 4 megabytes of RAM, 

install four 1 MB SIMMs in Bank B (Figure 15, #2). 
Leave the other four 1 MB SIMMs in Bank A. 

6. Replace the main logic board, and replace the cover . 






Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Jan 89 Additional Procedures / 6.23 



□ MACINTOSH SE CHASSIS TAB MODIFICATION 



Introduction 



Some chassis configurations for the Macintosh SE have 
left side panels (side opposite the analog board) with 
protruding tabs. The protruding tab nearest the back of 
the chassis may interfere with the installation of some 
third-party cards, or it may interfere with the routing 
of some third-party card cables. If you encounter this 
problem when installing third-party cards or cables, 
perform the following procedure. 



Materials Required 



Pliers 



Modification 
Procedure 



Although chassis configurations may differ slightly, the 
procedure for modifying chassis tabs is the same. 



CAUTION: When bending chassis tabs, make sure the 
pliers do not slip off the chassis and damage nearby 
components. 

To modify a Macintosh SE chassis, bend the tab 
(Figure 16, #1) with a pair of pliers until the tab is 
flush with the chassis side panel (Figure 16, #2). 




FIGURE 16 



6.24 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



□ CHASSIS ASSEMBLY 



Introduction 



The Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 have a 
redesigned chassis assembly that consists of two 
pieces — a chassis, and a separate bracket. The bracket 
will need to be assembled on the chassis whenever you 
install the new chassis assembly. The new chassis 
assembly must be installed if you are upgrading a 
Macintosh SE with an older chassis to a Macintosh 
SE/30. 



Materials Required 



Chassis 

Bracket 

3 screws 

Phillips screwdriver 



Assembly 
Procedure 



Position the bracket (Figure 17, #1) on the chassis as 
shown in Figure 17. Align the three screw holes in the 
bracket and chassis, and install three screws 
(Figure 17, #2). 




FIGURE 17 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Jan 89 



Additional Procedures / 6.25 



□ MACINTOSH SE/30 LOGIC BOARD UPGRADE 



Introduction 



A Macintosh SE/30 Logic Board Upgrade Kit is available 
to Macintosh SE owners. The Macintosh SE/30 logic 
board includes a 68030 microprocessor with built-in 
paged memory management, a 68882 math coprocessor, a 
new ROM SIMM, and a SWIM chip capable of 
controlling the 1.4 MB FDHD disk drive. 



. 



The upgrade kit includes, in addition to the new logic 
board: a new bezel (the Macintosh SE/30 supports only 
one internal drive), a ferrite bead and tie- wrap for EMI 
protection, a new chassis and bracket, a new RFI 
shroud, and a return sheet to be filled out when 
returning the original logic board to Apple. 

Four identical RAM SIMMs must be installed in each 
bank of SIMM slots on the Macintosh SE/30 logic board 
(or the entire bank must be left empty). Therefore, 
customers whose Macintosh SE systems have 2 MB or 
2.5 MB of RAM will need to obtain additional RAM 
SIMMs to use the upgraded logic board. 

Refer to Section 2, Take-Apart, for referenced 
procedures. 



Materials Required 



Macintosh SE/30 Logic Board Upgrade Kit 
Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Medium Phillips screwdriver 
Torx screwdriver 



Installation 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 



2. Place the Macintosh SE on the grounded workbench 
pad and put on your grounding wriststrap — but 
never put on the grounding wriststrap until after 
the CRT is discharged. 

3. Remove the video board . 

4. Remove the main logic board and place it on the 
grounded workbench pad. Fill out the return sheet 
and return the main logic board to Apple. 

5. Remove the analog board . (Do not remove the 
power supply from the analog board.) 



6.26 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Apr 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 







FIGURE 18 

6. Remove the SCSI hard disk drive or upper 800K 
disk drive , whichever is present. 

7. Remove the five Torx screws (Figure 18, #1) that 
secure the metal chassis to the bezel, and lift out 
the chassis (with internal disk drive attached). 

8. Remove the CRT and install it in the new bezel . 

9. Assemble the new chassis and bracket (refer to 
Additional Procedures). 

10. Remove the lower disk drive from the old chassis, 
and install it on the new chassis . 

Note: If you are also installing an FDHD Drive Kit, 
do that installation now. 

11. Position the new chassis, with the internal disk 
drive attached, on the new bezel and install five 
Torx screws (Figure 18, #1). 

12. If vou removed a SCSI hard disk drive from the old 
chassis, install the drive on the new chassis . 

13. Replace the analog board . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Apr 89 



Additional Procedures / 6.27 




I 



FIGURE 19 



14. Install the new Macintosh SE/30 logic board . 

15. Position the clip-on ferrite bead (Figure 19, #1) 
around the video board cable as near the video 
board connector (Figure 19, #2) as possible. Snap 
the ferrite bead shut. 

16. Install a plastic tie- wrap (Figure 19, #3) on the 
cable to hold the ferrite bead near the connector. 
Cut off excess tie- wrap. 

17. Replace the video board . 

18. Install the new insulating paper shroud over the 
bottom of the Macintosh SE/30. and replace the 
cQvgr. 

19. Attach the two labels included with the upgrade kit: 

a) Attach the agency approval label over the 
previous agency label on the back of the cover. 

b) Attach the 800K drive label in the groove to the 
right of the disk drive slot on the new bezel. 

20. Be sure to run System Installer (version 6.0.3 or 
greater), if you have not done so already. 

21. Run the diagnostics to ensure that the upgrade is 
installed and functioning correctly. Refer to Section 
3, Diagnostics, for further information. 



6.28 / Additional Procedures rev. Apr 89 Macintosh SE and SE/30 






□ FDHD UPGRADE FOR THE MACINTOSH SE 



Introduction 



The 1.4 MB Apple FDHD disk drive is available to 
Macintosh SE owners. To upgrade a Macintosh SE so it 
can support the FDHD drive, you must install the 
Macintosh SE Apple FDHD Upgrade Kit. 

The Upgrade Kit includes the following items: 

• Two new ROMs for supporting the FDHD drive 

• A single SWIM disk controller chip to replace the 
IWM chip 

• An audio extension cable for reducing EMI 
interference when using the headphone jack 

• The new FDHD disk drive 

• System 6.0.3, an Apple product return form, and 
800K and FDHD stickers 



IMPORTANT: The System software must be version 6.0.3 
or higher to use the FDHD disk drive in the Macintosh SE. 
If the software is lower than 6.0.2, the drive will be 
recognized as an 800K mechanism. Run the Installer 
(version 6.0.3 or higher) to upgrade the System software. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
Macintosh SE Apple FDHD Upgrade Kit 
Small Phillips screwdriver 
IC extractor 



Upgrade 
Procedure 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh SE onto a soft, grounded work- 
bench pad and put on your grounding wriststrap. 
(Never put on a grounding wriststrap until after 
discharging the CRT.) 

3. Remove the video board from the neck of the CRT . 

4. Remove the SCSI hard disk drive or upper 8QQK 
disk drive , whichever is present. 

5. Remove the main logic board and place it on the 
grounded workbench pad . 

6. Remove the lower 800K disk drive . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Aug 89 



Additional Procedures / 6.29 



7. Using the IC extractor, remove the IWM chip 

(Figure 20, #1) and the two ROM chips (Figure 20, 
#2 and #3) from the logic board. 



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FIGURE 20 

8. Install the SWIM chip and two new ROMs as 
indicated in the following chart: 



ROM 


P/N 


Location 


Figure 


SWIM 


344-0062 


D8 


20, #1 


HI 


342-0701 


D6 


20, #3 


LO 


342-0702 


D7 


20, #2 



Note: The notch at the end of the SWIM chip and 
each ROM should face the front of the logic board 
(toward the SIMMs). 

9. Install the lower internal (FDHD) disk drive . 

10. Replace the main logic board . 

Note: Customers with dual floppy-drive versions of 
the Macintosh SE may wish to replace both internal 
800K drives with FDHD drives. 

11. Replace the SCSI hard disk r upper 800K drive r or 
second FDHD drive , whichever is present. 

12. Replace the video board and cover . 



6.30 / Additional Procedures 



Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






13. Place the FDHD label in the groove next to the 
lower disk drive slot on the front bezel of the 
Macintosh SE as shown in Figure 21, #1. If an 800K 
drive is mounted above the FDHD drive, place the 
800K label (Figure 21, #2) next to the upper disk 
drive slot on the front bezel. 



r i 



FDH MJLJ 

Macintosh SE 





,»»,« ' 



FIGURE 21 

14. Be sure to run the System Installer (version 6.0.3 or 
higher), if you have not done so already. 

15. Run the diagnostics to ensure that the upgrade is 
installed and functioning correctly. Refer to Section 
3, Diagnostics, for further information. 

16. Return to Apple the two ROMs and IWM chip 
removed from the customer's logic board. 

Note: Remember to give your customer the audio 
extension cable included with the Upgrade Kit, and 
explain its use to the customer. To reduce interference, 
the audio extension cable (with ferrite bead) must be 
installed between the customer's audio cable and the 
audio jack at the rear of the Macintosh SE. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 Aug 89 Additional Procedures / 6.31 



fk Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 

Section 7 - SE-Bus PC Card 



□ CONTENTS 








7.2 


Product Description 




7.2 


SE-Bus PC Card and Cable Procedures 




7.2 


Materials Required 




7.3 


Install or Replace Cable 




7.5 


Install or Replace SE-Bus PC Card 




7.8 


Remove Cable 




7.10 


Remove SE-Bus PC Card 




7.11 


Troubleshooting 



Note: The SE-Bus PC Card is necessary for the 
Macintosh SE only. 

Note: If a step in this section is underlined, detailed 
instructions for that step can be found in Section 2, 
Take-Apart. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Jan 89 SE-Bus PC Card / 7.1 



□ PRODUCT DESCRIPTION 

The Macintosh SE-Bus PC Card (for the Macintosh SE 
only) is a disk drive controller for the Apple PC 5.25 
Drive (sold separately). The SE-Bus PC Card and the 
Apple PC 5.25 Drive may be used with the Apple File 
Exchange program (sold separately) to transfer files 
between 3.5-inch Macintosh-formatted disks and 5.25- 
inch MS-DOS-formatted disks. 

The SE-Bus PC Card mounts on the main logic board in 
the Macintosh SE. A DB-37 connector on the SE-Bus PC 
Card cable (provided) mounts at the back of the 
Macintosh SE for connection to the Apple PC 5.25 
Drive. 



□ SE-BUS PC CARD AND CABLE PROCEDURES 

Use this procedure to install the SE-Bus PC Card and 
cable, or to replace previously installed components. If 
you are installing them, install the cable first, and then 
install the card. 



Materials Required #2 Phillips screwdriver 

Pliers 

SE-Bus PC Card 

SE-Bus PC Card assembly kit (provided): 
2 plastic standoffs 

1 SE-Bus PC Card cable 

2 screws 



7.2 / SE-Bus PC Card rev. Jan 89 Macintosh SE and SE/30 



Install or 
Replace Cable 



1. Remove the cover . 

2. If you are installing the cable (and not replacing it), 
locate the expansion port cover (Figure 1, #1) on 
the inside of the Macintosh SE cover. Squeeze the 
two center mounting tabs on the expansion cover 
(Figure 1, #2) toward each other, and push out to 
remove it. 




FIGURE 1 

Return the expansion port cover to the customer 
with the Macintosh SE. 

Note: Advise the customer that the expansion port 
cover should not be replaced unless the SE-Bus PC 
Card is removed. If the expansion cover is 
replaced, the Macintosh SE must be opened and the 
expansion cover removed before the expansion port 
can be used. 

3. Discharge the CRT . 

4. Place the Macintosh SE face down on the grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never put on the wriststrap until after 
the CRT has been discharged.) 

5. Remove the main logic board . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



SE-Bus PC Card / 7.3 



Stand the Macintosh SE upright so that the back is 
toward you. Position the mounting plate on the SE- 
Bus PC Card cable so that the 37-pin connector is 
facing you, and pin 1 is on the right (see Figure 2; 
the pin numbers are on the face of the connector). 
Mount the plate inside the chassis with the two 
Phillips screws (Figure 2, #1). 






CABLE 

MOUNTING 

PLATE 




CABLE 



FIGURE 2 

7. Route the 26-pin connector on the cable through the 
rectangular hole (Figure 2, #2) in the chassis 
bottom, and place the Macintosh SE face down. 

8. If you are also installing the SE-Bus PC Card, skip 
to "Install or Replace SE-Bus PC Card," step 5. 






7.4 /SE-Bus PC Card 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



9. Plug the cable into the 26-pin connector on the card 
(Figure 3, #1). 

10. Replace the main logic board . 

11. Replace the cover . 







*» OJ 



SMS: 




Install or Replace 
SE-Bus PC Card 



FIGURE 3 



1. Remove the cover . 

2. Discharge the CRT . 

3. Place the Macintosh SE face down on the grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never put on the grounding wriststrap 
until after the CRT has been discharged.) 



4. Remove the main logic board . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



SE-Bus PC Card / 7.5 



5. From the component side of the card, push the two 
plastic standoffs into the mounting holes (Figure 4, 
#1) until they snap into place. 




FIGURE 4 

6. Locate the 96-pin Euro-DIN connector on the card 
(Figure 4, #2) and the internal expansion connector 
on the main logic board (Figure 5, #1). Turn the 
card component-side-down above the main logic 
board, and join the two connectors (Figure 6). 




FIGURE 5 






7.6/SE-BusPCCard 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 







FIGURE 6 

7. Align the plastic standoffs on the card with the 
mounting holes on the main logic board (Figure 6, 
#1). Push the standoffs into the holes until they 
snap in place. 

8. Position the Macintosh SE with the face down and 
the bottom toward you. Plug the SE-Bus PC Card 
cable into the 26-pin connector on the card 
(Figure 6, #2). 

9. Replace the main logic board . 
10. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



SE-Bus PC Card / 7.7 



Remove Cable 



1. Remove the cover . 



2. Discharge the CRT . 

3. Place the Macintosh SE face down on the grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never do this until after the CRT has 
been discharged.) 

4. Remove the main logic board . 

5. Unplug the SE-Bus PC Card cable from the 26-pin 
connector on the SE-Bus PC Card (Figure 7, #1). 




ii 




FIGURE 7 



7.8 / SE-Bus PC Card 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



6. Stand the Macintosh SE upright so that the back is 
toward you. Remove the two Phillips screws 
(Figure 8, #1) that secure the cable mounting plate. 

7. Pull the cable through the rectangular hole in the 
chassis bottom (Figure 8, #2) and out of the 
computer. 



CABLE 

MOUNTING 

PLATE 




CABLE 



FIGURE 8 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



SE-Bus PC Card / 7.9 



Remove 
SE-Bus PC Card 



1. Remove the cover . 

2. Discharge foe CRT. 

3. Place the Macintosh SE face down on the grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never do this until after the CRT has 
been discharged.) 

4. Remove the main logic board . 

5. Unplug the SE-Bus PC Card cable from the 26-pin 
connector on the SE-Bus PC Card (Figure 9, #3). 



i 




FIGURE 9 

6. Working from the bottom side of the logic board, 
squeeze the plastic standoff ends (Figure 9, #1) 
with a pair of pliers, and push the standoffs out of 
the holes (Figure 10). 



7.10 /SE-Bus PC Card 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



STANDOFF 




FIGURE 10 

7. Unplug and remove the card from the 96-pin Euro- 
DIN connector on the main logic board 

(Figure 9, #2). 

8. Use a pair of pliers to remove the plastic standoffs 
from the card (Figure 10). 



□ TROUBLESHOOTING 



Refer to Apple PC 5.25 Drive Technical Procedures for 
troubleshooting instructions. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Jan 89 



SE-Bus PC Card/ 7.11 



4 Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30 



□ CONTENTS 



Illustrated Parts List 



IPL.3 Internal View (Figure 1) 

IPL.5 Chassis Assembly (Figure 2) 

IPL.7 External Rear Housing (Figure 3) 

IPL.9 Front Bezel (Figure 4) 

IPL.ll Logic Board— Macintosh SE (Figure 5) 

IPL.13 Logic Board— Macintosh SE/30 (Figure 6) 

IPL.15 Analog Board (Figure 7) 

IPL.17 Shipping Fixture, 800K/1.4 MB Drives (Figure 8) 

IPL.17 Dual Internal Drives (Figure 9) 

IPL.19 Internal HDA (Figure 10) 



The figures and lists above include all piece parts that 
can be purchased separately from Apple for the 
Macintosh SE and Macintosh SE/30, along with their part 
numbers. These are the only parts available from Apple. 
Refer to your Apple Service Programs manual for prices. 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Nov 90 



Illustrated Parts List /I PL. 1 




FIGURE 1 



IPL.2 / Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



□ INTERNAL VIEW (Figure 1) 



Item Part No. Description 

1 810-0399 Front Bezel with Speaker, Slot Cover, Macintosh SE 

(800K) 

810-0422 Front Bezel with Speaker, Slot Cover, Macintosh SE 

(FDHD) 

630-5499 Front Bezel, with Speaker, Macintosh SE/30 

2 076-0103 CRT and Yoke Assembly 

3 661-0371 Analog Board, Macintosh SE and SE/30 

4 982-0024 Video Board, Vertical Macintosh SE and SE/30 

5 860-0282 Washer, Lock, Internal Tooth 

6 416-1310 Screw, M 3 x 5 x 10 PNCR 

7 076-0311 Fan Kit 

8 462-3100 Screw, M 3 x .5 x 6 

9 470-2101 Screw, M 2.9 x 10 

10 805-0576 Lower Ground Clip 

11 590-0380 Cable, Power AC 

12 805-5060 Shroud, RFI, Macintosh SE 
805-0969 Shroud, RFI, Macintosh SE/30 

13 462-4100 Screw, M 3.5 x .6 x 8, PNCR Rec 

14 661-0369 Logic Board, Macintosh SE (replaced by 661-0526) 
661-0490 Logic Board, Macintosh SE (revised), (replaced 

by 661-0526) 

661-0526 Logic Board, Macintosh SE 800K (without RAM) 

661-0510 Logic Board, Macintosh SE/30 (replaced by 661-0527) 

661-0527 Logic Board, Macintosh SE/30 (without RAM) 

661-0536 Logic Board, Macintosh SE (FDHD) (without RAM) 

15 590-0437 Cable, 3.5 Drive Internal (yellow stripe) 

16 590-0211 Cable, HDA I/O 

17 805-0938 Chassis, Macintosh SE and SE/30 

18 661-0345 800K Mechanism, Apple 3.5 Drive 
661-0474 1.4 MB Mechanism, Apple 3.5 Drive 

19 661-0373 HDA, Internal, 20 MB, 3.5 SCSI 
661-0464 HDA, Internal, 40 MB, 3.5 SCSI 
661-0600 HDA, Internal, 80 MB, 3.5 SCSI 

20 590-0392 Cable, Logic Board Power Interconnect 

21 661-0370 Power Supply, Macintosh SE and SE/30 

22 159-0061 Ferrite Bead, Clamp-on 

23 426-1001 Screw, Tap, M 4.22 x 1.41 x 16, Pan, Torx, Zinc (CRT 

and Chassis) 

602-0164 Service Packaging, 3.5 HDA 

602-0210 Service Packaging, 800K/1.4 MB Drive 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Nov 90 



Illustrated Parts List/ 1 PL.3 





FIGURE 2 



IPL.4/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



□ CHASSIS ASSEMBLY (Figure 2) 

Item Part No, Description 

1 805-0938 Chassis, Macintosh SE and SE/30 

2 805-0939 Bracket, Macintosh SE and SE/30 

3 470-2101 Screw, M 2.9 x 10 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Jan 89 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.5 



I 




FIGURE 3 






IPL6/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



□ EXTERNAL REAR HOUSING (Figure 3) 

Item Part No. Description 

1 630-5271 Rear Housing Assembly with Door and Feet 

2 825-2021 Agency Approval Label, Macintosh SE 
825-2043 Agency Approval Label, Macintosh SE/30 

3 805-0575 Upper Ground Clip 

4 865-0051 Foot, Platinum 

5 815-1008 Reset/Interrupt Switch 

6 590-0612 Audio Extension Cable 

7 435-5002 Screw, Tap, 8-32 x .625, Fill, Torx, Black Zinc Oxide 

(Main Case) 

8 815-0986 Rear Housing Door 

9 426-1007 Screw, Tap, M 4.22 x 1.41 x 16, Pan, Torx, Zinc (Main 

Case) 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Aug 89 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.7 




0© 



FIGURE 4 



IPL.8 / Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



□ FRONT BEZEL (Figure 4) 
Item Part No. Description 

1 825-1256 Logo Plate Label, Macintosh SE and SE/30 

2 600-0393 Speaker 

3 805-0908 Slot Cover Retainer, Macintosh SE 

4 630-5330 Slot Cover Bezel, Macintosh SE 

5 810-0399 Front Bezel with Speaker, Slot Cover, Macintosh SE 

(800K) 
810-0422 Front Bezel with Speaker, Slot Cover, Macintosh SE 

(FDHD) 
630-5499 Front Bezel with Speaker, Macintosh SE/30 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Aug 89 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.9 




FIGURE 5 



IPL10/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 






□ LOGIC BOARD— MACINTOSH SE (Figure 5) 

Rem Part No. Description 

1 742-0009 Lithium Battery (with leads) 
742-0010 Lithium Battery (without leads) 

2 661-0701 . ROM, High, Macintosh SE FDHD Upgrade 

3 661-0702 ROM, Low, Macintosh SE FDHD Upgrade 

4 344-0062 IC, SWIM 

5 661-0402 SIMM, 256K, 120 ns 
661-0403 SIMM, 1 MB, 120 ns 
661-0494 SIMM, DIP, 256K 
661-0410 SIMM, DIP, 1 MB 

6 101-4151 Resistor, 150 Ohms, .25 W, ± 5% 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Oct 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.1 1 




■ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•I '■ ■••••■•'•'••• ••■•••' P ! - ! . !! - ! . ! - !! } 

K3 - ™ n |;;;i:t:?i; | LJ □ 



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FIGURE 6 



I 



IPL12/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



□ LOGIC BOARD— MACINTOSH SE/30 (Figure 6) 



Item Part No. 



Description 



1 742-0011 Lithium Battery (without Leads) 

2 661-0402 SIMM, 256K, 120 ns 
661-0403 SIMM, 1 MB, 120 ns 
661-0494 SIMM, DIP, 256K, 120 ns 
661-0410 SIMM, DIP, 1 MB, 120 ns 

3 520-0344 Battery Holder Cover 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



rev. Oct 89 



Illustrated Parts List /IPL.1 3 




FIGURE 7 



' 



IPL14/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



□ ANALOG BOARD (Figure 7) 
Item Part No. Description 

1 661-0371 Analog Board, Macintosh SE and SE/30 

2 865-0047 Brightness Knob 

3 725-0020 Insulator, Analog Board 

4 830-0240 Fastener, Snap-in Plastic 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Jan 89 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.15 




FIGURE 8 




FIGURE 9 



' 



IPL.1 6/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Jun 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



□ SHIPPING FIXTURE, 800K/1.4 MB DRIVES (Figure 8) 

Item Part No. Description 

661-0345 800K Mechanism, Apple 3.5 Drive 

- 661-0474 1.4 MB Mechanism, Apple 3.5 Drive 

1 462-3401 Screw, M 3x6, with two washers 

2 003-0003 Packing Disk, 2-sided (for transporting) 

3 805-5050 Metal Housing/Shipping Fixture, 800K/1.4 MB 

Mechanism 



The metal housing/shipping fixture is required when 
using 800K/1.4 MB drive packaging. 



□ DUAL INTERNAL DRIVES (Figure 9) 

Item Part No. Description 

1 805-5050 Metal Housing/Shipping Fixture, 800K/1.4 MB 

Mechanism 

2 590-0188 Cable, 3.5 Internal Drive (red or yellow stripe) 

3 590-0437 Cable, 3.5 Internal Drive (yellow stripe) 

4 462-4100 Screw, M 3.5 x .6 x 8, PNCRS Rec 

5 462-3401 Screw, M 3x6, with two washers 

6 805-0914 Back Plate, Drive 2 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Aug 89 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.17 




I I 
I I 




FIGURE 10 



IPL18/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Jan 89 



Macintosh SE and SE/30 



□ INTERNAL HDA (Figure 10) 



tern 


Part No. 


Description 







661-0373 


HDA, Internal, 20 MB, 3.5 SCSI, 


Rev. A 


— 


661-0464 


HDA, Internal, 40 MB, 3.5 SCSI 




— 


661-0600 


HDA, Internal, 80 MB, 3.5 SCSI 




— 


661-0612 


HDA, Internal, 20 MB, 3.5 SCSI, 


Rev. B 


i 


590-0505 


Cable, Internal Power, HDA 




2 


805-5066 


Frame, HDA, Internal, 3.5 SCSI 




3 


590-0237 


Cable, HDA LED (red) 






590-0506 


Cable, HDA LED (amber) 





Macintosh SE and SE/30 rev. Oct 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.19 






« Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Classic 

Technical Procedures 



□ TABLE OF CONTENTS 




Section 1 - 


1.3 


Product Description 


Basics 


1.3 


Macintosh Classic Features 




1.5 


Connector Identification 




1.6 


Theory of Operation 




1.6 


Introduction 




1.6 


Main Logic Board 




1.8 


Power/Sweep Board 




1.8 


CRT and Video Board 




1.8 


Keyboard and Mouse 




1.9 


FDHD/SuperDrive 




1.10 


Care and Handling 


Section 2 - 


2.2 


Take-Apart Flowchart 


Take-Apart 


2.3 


Introduction 




2.3 


About This Section 




2.3 


Materials Required 




2.4 


Cover 




2.7 


Discharging the Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.7 


Discharge Procedure 




2.9 


Anode Cap 




2.11 


Power/Sweep Board 




2.13 


Memory Expansion Board 




2.15 


SIMMs 




2.17 


Main Logic Board 




2.19 


Internal SCSI Hard Disk Drive 




2.23 


Internal 1.4 MB FDHD/SuperDrive 




2.25 


Fan 




2.27 


Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.29 


Chassis and Front Bezel 




2.30 


Fuse 



Macintosh Classic 



rev. Dec 90 



Contents / i 



Section 3 - 


3.3 


Exterior (Service Panel) Adjustments 


Adjustments 


3.3 


Introduction 




3.3 


Materials Required 




3.3 


Adjustment Setup 




3.5 


Brightness and Contrast Adjustments 




3.7 


Centering Adjustments 




3.7 


Size Adjustments 




3.7 


Focus Adjustment 




3.8 


Interior (Yoke) Adjustment 




3.8 


Introduction 




3.9 


Materials Required 




3.9 


Tilt Adjustment 


Section 4 - 


4.2 


Introduction to MacTest CL 


Diagnostics 


4.2 


Components Tested by MacTest CL 




4.2 


Making Backup Disks 




4.3 


Copying MacTest CL Disks 




4.4 


Running MacTest CL 




4.4 


Materials Required 




4.4 


Starting MacTest CL 




4.5 


Helpful Hints 




4.6 


Installing the Loopbacks 




4.7 


Using the MacTest CL Menus 




4.10 


Running the Tests 




4.12 


SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure 




4.12 


To Determine If a Jumper Is Needed 




4.13 


To Install the Jumper 


Section 5 - 


5.3 


Introduction 


Troubleshooting 


5.3 


General Information 




5.3 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




5.3 


Things to Remember 




5.5 


Battery Verification 




5.5 


Introduction 




5.5 


Materials Required 




5.5 


Verification Procedure 




5.6 


Symptom Chart 




5.6 


Video Problems 




5.8 


Peripheral Problems 




5.9 


Floppy Drive Problems 




5.10 


SCSI Problems 




5.11 


Miscellaneous Problems 



ii / Contents 



rev. Dec 90 



Macintosh Classic 






Section 6 - 

Additional 

Procedures 



6.2 SIMM Upgrades 

6.2 RAM Configurations 

6.2 SIMM Identification 

6.2 Installing Upgrades 

6.3 Battery Replacement 

6.3 Introduction 

6.4 Replacement Procedure 



Illustrated 
Parts List 



IPL.3 Internal View (Figure 1) 



Note: The labels FDHD and FDHD/SuperDrive refer to 
the same product. 



©Apple Computer, Inc., 1990. No portion of this document may be reproduced in any form 
without the written permission of Apple Computer, Inc. 

MacTest, Apple Desktop Bus, FDHD, and SuperDrive are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 

Macintosh, ProDOS, Apple, and the Apple logo are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 

Classic is a registered trademark licensed to Apple Computer, Inc. 

MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. 

NuBus is a trademark of Texas Instruments. 



Macintosh Classic 



rev. Dec 90 



Contents / iii 






4 Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Classic 

Section 1 - Basics 



□ CONTENTS 








1.3 


Product Description 




1.3 


Macintosh Classic Features 




1.5 


Connector Identification 




1.6 


Theory of Operation 




1.6 


Introduction 




1.6 


Main Logic Board 




1.8 


Power/Sweep Board 




1.8 


CRT and Video Board 




1.8 


Keyboard and Mouse 




1.9 


FDHD/SuperDrive 




1.10 


Care and Handling 



Macintosh Classic Oct 90 Basics / 1 .1 



□ PRODUCT DESCRIPTION 



Macintosh Classic 
Features 



The Macintosh® Classic® is an enhanced Macintosh 
Plus that supports internal and external expansion 
options. This Macintosh comes with 1 megabyte (MB) of 
random-access memory (RAM) installed; upgrades to 2, 
2.5, and 4 megabytes are available. The customer has a 
choice of two drive configurations: 

• One internal 1.4 MB FDHD™ (floppy drive, high 
density)/SuperDrive™ floppy disk drive 

• One internal 1.4 MB FDHD/SuperDrive floppy disk 
drive and one internal 40 MB SCSI hard disk drive 

The Macintosh Classic supports the same peripherals as 
the Macintosh Plus, and will accept any keyboard or 
mouse that connects to the Apple Desktop Bus™ (ADB). 

The Macintosh Classic includes the following new or 
improved (as compared to the Macintosh Plus) features: 

• 1, 2, 2.5, or 4 MB of RAM— with 1 MB soldered on 
the logic board, 1 MB soldered on the add-on 
memory expansion board, and the remainder on two 
Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs) 

• New ROM with modifications that support the 
internal FDHD/SuperDrive and an external 
FDHD/SuperDrive 

• Choice of an optional 40 MB internal SCSI hard disk 

• Higher capacity wide-input-range power supply 

• Fan for cooling 

• SWIM disk controller chip, which replaces the IWM 
chip for controlling floppy disk drives 

• Long-life lithium battery for clock and RAM cache 

• One Apple Desktop Bus connector to support the 
detached keyboard and mouse 

• One disk drive port for an external FDHD/ 
SuperDrive 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Basics / 1 .3 




/m / O /S 

O 




Apple Desktop Bus External Drive Port SCSI Port Printer Port Modem Port Sound Port 



Figure 1-1 Back Panel Connectors 



i 



ua 




Memory Expansion 
Connector 



SCSI Hard Disk 
Cable Connector 



Main Logic Board 
Power Connector 



FDHD/SuperDrive 
Cable Connector 



Figure 1-2 Main Logic Board Connectors 






1 .4 / Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



Connector 
Identification 



The external connectors on the Macintosh Classic are 
the same as those on the Macintosh Plus, but the 
internal connectors differ slightly between models. The 
following section shows the location of all external and 
internal connectors on the rear panel. 



Back Panel 
Connectors 



The back panel of the Macintosh Classic has six 
installed ports (illustrated in Figure 1-1): 



Apple Desktop Bus (mini DIN-4) 
External drive port (DB-19) 
SCSI port (DB-25) 
Printer port (mini DIN-8) 
Modem port (mini DIN-8) 
Sound port (RCA phono jack) 



Main Logic Board 
Connectors 



There are four connectors (illustrated in Figure 1-2) on 
the Macintosh Classic logic board: 

• Memory expansion connector 

• Internal 1.4 MB FDHD/SuperDrive cable connector 

• Main logic board power connector 

• Internal SCSI hard disk cable connector 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Basics / 1 .5 



□ THEORY OF OPERATION 



Introduction 



The Macintosh Classic has six basic functional units: 



• Integrated main logic board (based on the Macintosh 
SE design) 

• Redesigned power/sweep board 

• 1.4 MB FDHD/SuperDrive floppy disk drive 

• Internal SCSI hard disk drive (optional) 

• Video display (cathode-ray tube, or CRT) 

• Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) keyboard and mouse 

"Module swapping," or repair by replacement of faulty 
modules, is much faster if you have a basic 
understanding of the function of each module in the 
system. If you know what each module does when it 
functions normally, you can more easily decide which 
module is at fault when a particular function is missing 
or degraded. This process is called "logical 
troubleshooting." The following section describes the 
Macintosh Classic modules and the functions they 
perform. Unless otherwise specified, Macintosh Plus 
features remain unchanged. 



Main Logic 
Board 



The Macintosh Classic main logic board is a completely 
re-engineered design based on the Macintosh SE logic 
board. It incorporates the gate array from the Macintosh 
SE but utilizes extensive surface-mount technology to 
reduce the board size by almost 50 percent. The 96-pin 
expansion connector on the Macintosh SE logic board 
has been replaced by a 44-pin connector for optional 
memory expansion. 



CPU 



The central processing unit (CPU) in the Macintosh 
Classic is a Motorola 68000 microprocessor operating at 
8.3336 megahertz (MHz). The microprocessor obtains 
instructions from memory, translates them, and carries 
them out. The microprocessor communicates with all 
components on the main logic board and with all 
peripherals. 



RAM 



The Macintosh Classic follows the Macintosh SE memory 
standard (1 MB; expandable to 2, 2.5, or 4 MB), but the 
Macintosh Classic implementation is unique. The first 
megabyte consists of eight 256K x 4-bit DRAM ICs 
soldered to the main logic board. A 44-pin connector on 






1 .6 / Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






the main logic board provides memory expansion 
signals. The second megabyte of memory is added by 
installing an optional memory expansion board (unique 
to the Macintosh Classic). The memory expansion board 
contains a bank of soldered 256K x 4-bit DRAMs, a 44- 
pin connector for connection to the main logic board, 
and a pair of SIMM connectors for additional RAM 
expansion. Two 256K or 1 MB SIMMs can be installed 
in these SIMM connectors to bring the total system 
memory to 2.5 MB or 4 MB, respectively. A 
programmable array logic (PAL) chip on the main logic 
board generates corrected column address strobe (CAS) 
signals for this new design. 



ROM 



The read-only memory (ROM) in the Macintosh Classic 
consists of a single 256K x 1 6-bit dual in-line package 
(DIP) chip in a 42-pin socket located on the main logic 
board. This chip is only a 40-pin DIP that provides 
512K of ROM memory, but the socket will accept ROMs 
up to 2 MB in size. However, the address map used in 
the Macintosh Classic provides for only 1 MB of ROM 
address space. Thus, if a 2 MB ROM IC is inserted, 
only 1 MB of the available space will be addressed. 



Floppy Disk 
Drives 



The Macintosh Classic follows the Macintosh Plus disk 
configuration: one internal floppy drive as standard, 
plus one optional external floppy drive. The SWIM 
chip, which supports internal and external FDHD/ 
SuperDrives, is the disk interface. 



Serial Ports 



The serial ports on the Macintosh Classic are identical 
to the ports on the Macintosh Plus, except that the 
support for synchronous modems and the general- 
purpose input (GPI) have been removed. 



Apple 
Desktop Bus 



The Macintosh Classic has only one Apple Desktop Bus 
(ADB) connector on the rear panel. The Apple Desktop 
Bus is a method and protocol for connecting computers 
with human input devices. The Macintosh Classic 
controls the flow of data to connected devices by 
issuing commands through the Apple Desktop Bus. 



SCSI Bus 



The Apple SCSI manager supports up to seven daisy- 
chained SCSI devices. 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Basics / 1 .7 



Sound Port 



The Macintosh Classic provides a dual-channel 
headphone connector, but both channels are connected 
to the monophonic sound output. Thus, the Macintosh 
Classic does not provide a true two-channel output 
(although a stereo jack may be used). 



Power/Sweep 
Board 



The power supply has been redesigned to accommodate 
the elements of the Macintosh Plus and the Macintosh 
SE that are combined in the Macintosh Classic. The new 
output specifications follow: 



Regulation 




+ 5V 


4.85 


to 5.2 VDC 


+12V 


11.5 


to 12.5 VDC 


-12V 


-13.2 


to 10.8 VDC 


Loading 


Min 


Max Peak 


+ 5V 


.5 A 


3.5 A 3.5 A 


+ 12V 


.01A 


.5 A 1.2 A 


-12V 


.01A 


.05A .05A 



All other specifications follow the Macintosh SE 
conventions. 



Contrast 
Control 



The power/sweep contrast control knob (formerly 
available under the front edge of the bezel) has been 
removed. The contrast of the screen is now controlled 
by Control Panel software. 



CRT and 
Video Board 



The cathode-ray tube (CRT) provides the high- 
resolution video display. The anode of the CRT 
receives high voltage from the flyback transformer on 
the power/sweep board. The power/sweep board also 
supplies the CRT neck and yoke voltages and signals 
that enable the CRT to create the video display. The 
video board (part of the power/sweep assembly) 
provides video amplification and overvoltage protection 
to the neck of the CRT. 



Keyboard 
and Mouse 



The keyboard connects to the Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) 
port on the rear of the Macintosh Classic. The mouse 
connects to the keyboard. All Apple ADB devices 
communicate with the main logic board via a mini DIN-4 
connector. All ADB devices have a microprocessor that 
makes them intelligent. All except the mouse have 
ports for daisy-chaining other ADB devices. 



1 .8 / Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






FDHD/ The 3.5-inch, 1.4 MB FDHD/SuperDrive is a high- 

SuperDrive density data storage system for the Macintosh Classic. 

Special high-density, 3.5-inch media are required to 
take full advantage of the increased data storage 
capacity of the FDHD/SuperDrive. Do not, however, 
use high-density media in 400K or 800K disk drives; 
data written to or read from such media by lower 
capactity drives will be unreliable. A simple rule-of- 
thumb is always to use media appropriate for the drive 
of lowest capacity; if you have 800K and 1.4 MB disk 
drives, use only 800K media. 

When used with the Apple File Exchange utility, the 
FDHD/SuperDrive enables Apple systems (GCR data 
format) to exchange data with MS-DOS® systems (MFM 
data format). The FDHD/SuperDrive can read/write and 
format 400K, 800K, and 1.4 MB Macintosh disks; 720K 
and 1.4 MB MS-DOS disks; and 800K ProDOS disks. 
When reading data in other formats, the Macintosh first 
copies MS-DOS or ProDOS® data files using the 
FDHD/SuperDrive and Apple File Exchange utility, and 
then uses special file translators to convert the data 
from one application format to another. (Some 
applications perform their own translations.) 



Macintosh Classic Oct 90 Basics / 1 .9 



□ CARE AND HANDLING 



I 



The Macintosh Classic is small enough to be somewhat 
portable. However, the computer contains a CRT 
(cathode-ray tube — the picture tube), which operates at 
very high voltages and contains a high vacuum. If 
cracked or broken, the CRT can implode (collapse into 
itself) and scatter glass in all directions. 

WARNING: Before working inside this computer, read 
Section 8, CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. 

The computer may also contain a hard disk. The hard 
disk is a mechanical device with moving parts. Rough 
handling such as jarring or bumping, especially while 
the hard disk is operating, could result in a mechanical 
failure or damage to the information stored on the hard 
disk. Careless handling accounts for more drive 
failures than all other factors combined 

Always be sure to 

• Leave the Macintosh Classic and the CRT and hard 
disk drive modules in their shipping containers 
until use. 

• Use the Apple shipping containers and packing 
materials when transporting the computer or 
modules. 

• Once the CRT has been discharged and before 
beginning any repair procedure, place the Macintosh 
Classic on a grounded workbench mat and put on 
your grounding wriststrap or heelstrap. 

• During power-down, never move a Macintosh 
Classic with a hard disk drive. After the power is 
turned off, the hard disk will slow and the heads 
will land within 15 seconds. Any jolts to the drive 
during power-down may cause the heads to crash 
into the media surfaces. 

• Never drop a Macintosh Classic. Even a drop of one 
inch to a hard surface could cause implosion of the 
CRT and/or a hard disk drive failure. 



1.10/ Basics Oct 90 Macintosh Classic 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Classic 

Section 2 - Take-Apart 



□ CONTENTS 








2.2 


Take-Apart Flowchart 




2.3 


Introduction 




2.3 


About This Section 




2.3 


Materials Required 




2.4 


Cover 




2.7 


Discharging the Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.7 


Discharge Procedure 




2.9 


Anode Cap 




2.11 


Power/Sweep Board 




2.13 


Memory Expansion Board 




2.15 


SIMMs 




2.17 


Main Logic Board 




2.19 


Internal SCSI Hard Disk Drive 




2.23 


Internal 1.4 MB FDHD/SuperDrive 




2.25 


Fan 




2.27 


Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 




2.29 


Chassis and Front Bezel 




2.30 


Fuse 



Note: If a step is underlined, detailed instructions for 
that step can be found elsewhere in this section. 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.1 



ro 
ho 



I 

CD 

> 
■D 

3. 



Macintosh Classic Take-Apart Flowchart 



to 
o 



2 

Q 

3 
O 

co 

=r 

Q 

Co 

CO 
CO 

o" 



Cover 



-> 


Discharge 
CRT 






— > 


CRT 


































w 


Anode 
Cap 




v 


Power/Sweep 
Board 












r 




^^ 






















— > 


Fan 






1— > 
1 > 


Bezel 


\ 


Fuse 








— > 






















SIMMs 


























| > 


Chassis 






w 


Memory 

Expansion 

Board 








| > 




w 




















— > 


Main Logic 
Board 






















> 


FDHD/ 
SuperDrive 
























v 


SCSI Hard 


























r 


Dis 


k Drive 











Order of module removal is 
Left-to-Right, Top-to-Bottom 



□ INTRODUCTION 

About This 
Section 



The flowchart on the left has a left-to-right, top-to- 
bottom flow. The chart is designed so that you can see 
quickly what modules have to be removed before you 
can work on the module you want. 

If a step is underlined in the procedures that follow, 
detailed instructions for that step can be found in other 
procedures in the section. First you will have to refer 
back to the earlier procedures and remove those 
modules before you can continue. 

The materials required for the entire take-apart are 
listed below. This list will give you an idea of what 
tools you need when taking apart the Macintosh Classic. 

The graphics are designed to give you maximum 
assistance. When you look at the graphics, pay 
attention to details, captions, and arrows. 



Materials Required 



Macintosh pull-apart tool (part number 076-8059) 

Torque driver 

Torx driver (part number 076-8053) 

Magnetized #2 Phillips screwdriver 

Stump-handled, medium Phillips screwdriver 

Small, flat-blade screwdriver 

Fuse puller 

Art knife 

SIMM removal tool (part number 076-8354) 

Grounded workbench pad 

Grounding wriststrap 

Safety goggles 

Foam pad (ungrounded) 

Needlenose pliers 

Alligator lead 

CRT discharge tool (part number 076-0381) 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.3 




Torx Screws 



Figure 2-1 Cover 



□ COVER 



The cover encloses the top, sides, rear, and bottom of 
the Macintosh Classic. The cover is easy to remove 
using a Torx screwdriver and a Macintosh pull-apart 
tool. 

WARNING: Macintosh Classic computers contain high 
voltage and a high-vacuum picture tube. To prevent 
serious personal injury and property damage, be sure you 
read and understand the safety precautions in Section 8, 
CRT Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab before you 
remove the back cover. Failure to follow the safety rules 
could result in serious injury. 



2.4 / Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



CAUTION: Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can cause 
severe damage to sensitive microcircuits. The Macintosh 
Classic logic board contains CMOS components, among 
the most sensitive chips in use today. All printed circuit 
assemblies and ICs (integrated circuits, or "chips"), 
especially removable ones, must be handled with care. 
To prevent ESD damage to the RAM chips, CMOS chips, 
ROM chips, and SIMMs, follow the precautions outlined 
for ESD prevention under the You Oughta Know fad. 

CAUTION: Be especially careful when handling a 
Macintosh Classic with an internal hard disk. Do not drop 
or jar the unit. 

Refer to Figure 2-1 when removing and replacing the 
cover. 



Remove 



1. Turn off the power. Disconnect the power cord and 
all other cables from the back of the computer. 



2. Place the Macintosh Classic face-down on the 
workbench pad. 

3. Remove the four Torx screws. 

4. Carefully lift the cover off the chassis. If the cover 
is difficult to remove, use the pull-apart tool. (To 
prevent cosmetic damage to the cover and bezel, do 
not use a screwdriver to pry off the cover.) 

WARNING: The edges of the metal chassis may be 
sharp. Handle the metal chassis carefully. 



Replace 



1. Place the Macintosh Classic face-down on the 
workbench pad. 



2. Slide the cover over the chassis and fit the cover 
into the front bezel. 

3. Replace the four Torx screws. (Install the two 
black screws in the lower two screw holes and the 
two silver-colored screws in the upper two screw 
holes.) 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take- Apart / 2.5 



Anode Wire 



Anode Cap 




Flyback Transformer 



% 






Yoke 



B 



CRT Discharge Tool 



Ground Lug 








~~j5^?b 


^Hj 


' /' : ^4?^ 




'X. K::A 


r-.t'.v'-- 






X ,-•"' 



s ... \ Anode Connector 



Figure 2-2 Discharging the CRT 



2.6 / Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






□ DISCHARGING THE CATHODE-RAY TUBE (CRT) 



Even though the CRT in the Macintosh Classic is 
equipped with a bleeder resistor that automatically 
drains the charge from the CRT when the power is shut 
off, you must follow the discharge procedure below to 
protect yourself in the event that the resistor has failed 
and the anode is still charged. 

WARNING: Before starting, read the safety precautions 
and the CRT discharge procedure in Section 8, CRT 
Safety, under the You Oughta Know tab. Alternative 
instructions for discharging the CRT using the older 
version of the discharge tool (and/or a screwdriver) are 
also given in that section. 

Refer to Figure 2-2 when discharging the CRT. 



Discharge 
Procedure 



Remove your grounding wriststrap and jewelry and 
put on safety goggles before beginning. 






2. Remove the cover . 

WARNING: Do not touch the yoke or yoke wires, anode 
wire, anode cap, or flyback transformer (Figure 2-2A). 

3. Set the computer upright on an ungrounded pad, 
with the back of the unit facing you. 

4. Attach the alligator clip on the CRT discharge tool 
to the metal part of the ground lug (Figure 2-2B). 



CAUTION: Discharging the CRT to any part of the 
chassis other than the ground lug could damage the main 
logic board and/or the power/sweep board. 

5. Put one hand behind your back and grasp only the 
insulated handle of the discharge tool with your 
other hand 

6. Slide the CRT discharge tool probe under the anode 
cap until the probe touches the anode ring 
(Figure 2-2B). 

7. Remove the CRT discharge tool probe from under 
the anode cap. Remove the alligator clip from the 
ground lug. 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.7 



Anode Cap 



Alligator Lead 



Ground Lug 




Anode Aperture 



Figure 2-3 Anode Cap 






2.8 / Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



Anode Cap For some of the following procedures, you may have to 

remove the anode cap (sometimes also called the anode 
connector) (Figure 2-3). To do so, first discharge the 
CRT . Then peel back the rubber edge of the anode cap 
until you can see the metal connector prongs in the 
center of the cap. Note how the prongs are clipped into 
the aperture on the CRT. Using the needlenose pliers, 
compress the two metal prongs to free the connector 
from the CRT. 

To replace the anode cap, compress the two metal 
connector prongs and insert the prongs securely into the 
anode aperture of the CRT. Press down around the 
rubber cap to form a seal against the CRT surface. 

Note: If the bleeder resister fails, a secondary charge 
could build up over a period of time, even after you 
have discharged the CRT. To dissipate any residual 
charge, establish an ongoing ground by clipping one end 
of an alligator lead to the ground lug and the other end 
to the anode aperture. 






Macintosh Classic Oct 90 Take-Apart / 2.9 



I 



Ground Lug Screw s^^fi%*\ 



Video Board 




^■-4£:> 




m:-- 



i 



Main Logic Board 
Power Cable 




Screws 



J V 



Yoke Cable 



Fan Cable 




SCSI Hard 

Disk Power Cable 



D 



J V 




Chassis Ridge # 



Figure 2-4 Power/Sweep Board 



2.10 /Take- Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






□ POWER/SWEEP BOARD 



The power/sweep board is mounted on the side of the 
Macintosh Classic chassis. The video board fits on the 
neck of the CRT but is hard-wired to the power/sweep 
board and is thus part of the power/sweep assembly. 



Refer to Figure 2-4 when removing and replacing the 
power/sweep board. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover , discharge the CRT , and remove 
the anode cap . 

2. After the CRT is discharged, move the Macintosh 
Classic onto your grounded workbench pad and put 
on your grounding wriststrap. 

3. Remove the Torx screw that secures the ground 
wire to the upper corner of the CRT (Figure 2-4A). 

4. Carefully pull the video board off the neck of the 
CRT (Figure 2-4A). (If there is sealant holding the 
board in place, cut it away with an art knife.) 

5. Remove the main logic board power cable connector 
(Figure 2-4B) from the main logic board. 

6. Remove the two Phillips screws that secure the 
power/sweep bracket to the chassis and pull the 
board slightly away from the chassis (Figure 2-4B). 

7. Remove the following cable connectors from the 
power/sweep board (Figure 2-4C): 

• Yoke cable (First depress the tab.) 

• Fan cable 

• SCSI hard disk power cable, if present 

8. Lift the board free. 



Replace 



Position the power/sweep board near the chassis as 
shown in Figure 2-4D. Reconnect the following 
connectors (Figure 2-4C): 



• Yoke cable 

• Fan cable 

• SCSI hard disk power cable, if present 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.11 



2. Fit the groove on the bottom of the power/sweep 
board over the ridge along the side of the chassis 
(Figure 2-4D). Slide the power/sweep board toward 
the front bezel as far as possible. 

3. Replace the two Phillips screws (Figure 2-4B). 

4. Reconnect the main logic board power cable 
connector to the main logic board (Figure 2-4B). 

5. Replace the video board on the neck of the CRT 
(Figure 2-4A). 

6. Position the video board ground wire lug over the 
upper corner of the CRT and replace the Torx screw 
(Figure 2-4A). 

7. Replace the anode cap and the cover . 



Memory Expansion Board 




Support Grooves 



Figure 2-5 Memory Expansion Board 






2.12 /Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






□ MEMORY EXPANSION BOARD 



The optional memory expansion board connects at a right 
angle to the main logic board and is supported by the 
side of the chassis. The memory expansion board contains 
1 MB of soldered DRAM plus one pair of SIMM 
connectors. (For specific information about SIMM 
upgrades, see Section 6, Additional Procedures.) 

Refer to Figure 2-5 when removing and replacing the 
memory expansion board. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 



2. Move the Macintosh Classic onto your grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never put on a grounding strap until 
after the CRT is discharged.) 

3. Carefully slide the memory expansion board up to 
free it from the main logic board and the chassis. 



Replace 



1. Hold the memory expansion board by the edges and 
slide it between the support grooves on the chassis 
until the connector is seated securely on the main 
logic board. 



2. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.13 




Figure 2-6 SIMMs 



2.14 /Take-Apart 



rev. Nov 90 



Macintosh Classic 



□ SIMMS 



You may expand the capacity of the memory expansion 
board by adding two 256K or two 1 MB single in-line 
memory modules (SIMMs). The jumper on the SIMM 
board must be set correctly for the presence or absence 
of SIMMs. 

Refer to Figure 2-6 when removing and installing 
SIMMs. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. After the CRT is discharged, move the Macintosh 
Classic onto your grounded workbench pad and put 
on your grounding wriststrap. 

3. Remove the memory expansion board and place it on 
the grounded workbench pad. 

4. To remove a SIMM, use the SIMM removal tool. See 
the You Oughta Know tab for instruction on tool use. 



Install 



CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to damage from 
ESD and skin acid. When installing SIMMs, wear a 
grounding strap and handle the SIMMs only by the edges! 

1. To install a SIMM, hold the SIMM by the edges with 
the contacts on the SIMM pointing down. Insert the 
SIMM at an angle (bottom forward) into the 
connector on the expansion board. Push back on the 
top corners of the SIMM. You will hear a click 
when the SIMM snaps into place. 

2. Look at the jumper at the upper edge of the 
expansion board. For the board to operate properly 
when SIMMs are installed, the jumper must be over 
the first and second pins from the outside edge. 
(For board operation without SIMMs, the jumper 
must be over the second and third pins.) If the 
jumper is not in the proper position, simply pull the 
jumper off the pins and reposition it correctly. 

3. Replace the memory expansion board . 

4. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh Classic 



rev. Nov 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.15 



r 



B 







SCSI Cable 
Connector 



FDHD/SuperDrlve 
Cable Connector 



/ \ \ v 




Figure 2-7 Main Logic Board 



2.16/ Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






□ MAIN LOGIC BOARD 



The main logic board is located in the bottom rear of 
the Macintosh Classic chassis. The board has 1 MB of 
soldered RAM and no SIMM connectors. 

Refer to Figure 2-7 when removing and replacing the 
main logic board. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh Classic onto your grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never put on a grounding strap until 
after the CRT is discharged.) 

3. Remove the memory expansion board . 

4. Disconnect the following cables from the main logic 
board (Figure 2-7A): 

• Main logic board power cable 

• FDHD/SuperDrive drive cable 

• SCSI connector cable, if present 

5. Place the Macintosh Classic face-down on the 
workbench pad. Grasp the main logic board by the 
corners and slide it straight up and out of the 
chassis (Figure 2-7B). 



Replace 



1. Place the Macintosh Classic face-down on the 
workbench pad. Hold the main logic board by the 
edges and slide it into its support grooves on the 
inside of the chassis; push the board in as far as it 
will go (Figure 2-7B). 

2. Set the computer upright and connect the following 
connectors (Figure 2-7A) to the main logic board: 

• Main logic board power cable 

• FDHD/SuperDrive drive cable 

• SCSI connector cable, if present 

3. Replace the memory expansion board . 

4. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.17 




Screws 



B 



J V 




SCSI 
Hard Drive 
Power Cable 




SCSI Hard Drive 
Mounting Carrier 




J K 



Figure 2-8 Internal SCSI Hard Disk Drive 



2.18 /Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






□ INTERNAL SCSI HARD DISK DRIVE 



The optional 40 MB internal SCSI hard disk drive is 
fastened above the internal floppy disk drive. Systems 
without a hard disk come with a SCSI terminator 
installed on the main logic board SCSI connector. 

Refer to Figure 2-8 when removing and replacing the 
internal SCSI hard disk drive. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh Classic onto your grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never put on a grounding strap until 
after the CRT is discharged.) 



3. Disconnect the SCSI connector cable from the main 
logic board (Figure 2-8A). 

4. Disconnect the SCSI hard disk drive power cable 
from the power/sweep board (Figure 2-8B). 

5. Remove the two Phillips screws that secure the 
hard disk drive housing to the FDHD/SuperDrive 
housing and lift out the hard disk assembly 
(Figure 2-8C). 

IMPORTANT: If you are removing a hard disk from the 
system but not installing a new one f you must install a 
SCSI terminator on the main logic board SCSI connector. 

6. If you are replacing the hard disk drive, remove the 
defective hard disk drive from its silver-colored 
metal carrier by removing the four Phillips screws 
and lockwashers from the silver-colored carrier 
(Figure 2-8D). 

CAUTION: DO NOT loosen or remove any of the four 
Torx screws that secure the black cover to the drive. 
Loosening or removing these screws can cause 
irreparable damage to the hard drive. 

Note: If you are replacing the hard disk drive, 
retain both the power cable and the SCSI connector 
cable. You will need them to install on the new 
drive. 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.19 






SCSI Hard Drive 
Mounting Carrier 




B 











Screws /V:%i> ; ' 



SCSI 
Hard Drive 
Power Cable 




Figure 2-9 Hard Disk Drive Carrier 



2.20 / Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



Replace 



If you are replacing a defective hard disk drive, begin 
with step 1. If you are reinstalling a drive that you 
removed (which has not been removed from its silver- 
colored metal carrier), begin with step 3. 

1. Position the silver metal carrier on the replacement 
hard disk drive. Loosely install the bracket with 
the four lockwashers and Phillips screws. 

2. Using a torque driver and following the sequence 
shown in Figure 2-9A, torque the four Phillips 
screws to 8.0 in-lbs. 

CAUTION: To avoid damage to the hard drive, be careful 
not to overtorque the screws. 

3. Replace the 50-pin SCSI connector cable on the 
hard disk drive assembly. 

4. Replace the SCSI power cable on the hard disk 
drive assembly. 

5. Slide the SCSI hard disk drive assembly over the 
FDHD/SuperDrive so that the tabs on the bottom of 
the hard drive housing mesh with the holes on the 
top of the FDHD/SuperDrive housing (Figure 2-9B). 

6. Replace the two screws that secure the SCSI hard 
disk drive housing to the FDHD/SuperDrive housing 
(Figure 2-9C). 

7. Reconnect the SCSI connector cable to the main 
logic board (Figure 2-9C). 

IMPORTANT: If you are installing a hard disk in a system 
that has not previously had one t you must remove the 
SCSI terminator from the main logic board SCSI 
connector before you can connect the hard disk SCSI 
connector cable to the main logic board. 

8. Reconnect the SCSI hard disk drive power cable to 
the power/sweep board (Figure 2-9D). 

9. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.21 




Figure 2-10 Internal 1.4 MB FDHD/SuperDrive 






2.22 / Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






□ INTERNAL 1.4 MB FDHD/SUPERDRIVE 



The internal 1.4 MB FDHD/SuperDrive is fastened to 
the metal chassis below the optional SCSI hard disk 
drive. 

Refer to Figure 2-10 when removing and replacing the 
internal 1.4 MB FDHD/SuperDrive. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. After the CRT is discharged, move the Macintosh 
Classic onto your grounded workbench pad and put 
on your grounding wriststrap. 

3. Remove the memory expansion board (if present) 
and the SCSI hard disk drive (if present). 

4. Remove the main logic board . 

5. Place the Macintosh Classic face-down on the 
workbench pad and remove the four Phillips screws 
from the chassis bottom (Figure 2-10A). 

6. Place the Macintosh Classic upright and lift out the 
FDHD/SuperDrive mechanism (Figure 2-1 OB). 



Replace 



1. Place the FDHD/SuperDrive into the chassis so that 
the tabs on the bottom of the metal drive housing fit 
into the holes in the chassis frame (Figure 2-10B). 

2. Holding the FDHD/SuperDrive in place with one 
hand, place the Macintosh Classic face-down on the 
workbench pad with the bottom facing you. 

3. Replace the four screws that secure the FDHD/ 
SuperDrive to the bottom chassis (Figure 2-10A). 

4. Replace the main logic board . 

5. Replace the SCSI hard disk drive (if you removed 
one). 

6. Replace the memory expansion board (if you 
removed one). 

7. Replace the cover . 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.23 



Screws 




Figure 2-11 Fan 






2.24 / Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






□ FAN 



The fan is mounted on the bottom chassis between the 
floppy disk drive and the power/sweep board. You 
must remove the power/sweep board in order to reach 
the fan. 

Refer to Figure 2-11 when removing and replacing the 
fan. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 



2. Remove the anode cap . 

3. Move the Macintosh Classic onto your grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never put on a grounding strap until 
after the CRT is discharged.) 

4. Remove the power/sweep board . 

5. Using a small, stump-handled Phillips screwdriver, 
remove the two screws that mount the fan to the 
bottom chassis. Lift the fan out of the chassis. 



Replace 



Place the fan (label up) in the bottom chassis. Orient 
the fan so that the fan cable is on the side nearest 
the outside of the Macintosh Classic. Match the 
corners of the fan to the screw holes. 



2. Replace the two mounting screws using the stump- 
handled Phillips screwdriver. 

3. Replace the power/sweep board. 

Note: Directions for replacing the video board are 
included in the power/sweep board procedure. 

4. Replace the <mQde cap. 

5. Repine the cover. 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.25 



Video Board 



Ground Wire 




Figure 2-12 Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) 



- 



2.26 / Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






□ CATHODE-RAY TUBE (CRT) 



The cathode-ray tube (CRT) is mounted by four Torx 
screws to the front bezel. The cathode-ray tube comes 
with the yoke assembly installed, so you never have to 
remove the yoke. 



WARNING: Before you handle the CRT, be sure you 
review the precautions given in Section 8, CRT Safety, 
under the You Oughta Know tab. 

Refer to Figure 2-12 when removing and replacing the 
CRT. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover , discharge the CRT , and remove 
the anode cap . 

2. Move the Macintosh Classic onto your grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never put on a grounding strap until 
after the CRT is discharged.) 

3. Remove the power/sweep board . 

4. Place the Macintosh Classic face-down on the 
workbench pad. 

5. Remove the three remaining Torx mounting screws 
from the corners of the CRT. 

6. Carefully lift the CRT free from the bezel. 



Replace 



1. Place the Macintosh Classic face-down on the 
workbench pad. 

2. Place the CRT face-down in the bezel, with the 
anode aperture on your left, as shown in Figure 2-12. 

3. Replace the three CRT mounting screws. 

4. Replace the power/sweep board . 

Note: Directions for replacing the video board and 
the fourth CRT mounting screw are included in the 
power/sweep board procedure. 

5. Replace the anode cap and the cover . 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.27 




F'gure 2-13 Chassis 



and Front Bezel 



2 -28 /Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh C/assic 






□ CHASSIS AND FRONT BEZEL 



To replace the metal chassis, you must first remove all 
assemblies except the CRT. To remove the front bezel, 
you must remove the chassis and the CRT. 

Refer to Figure 2-13 when removing and replacing the 
chassis and the front bezel. 



Remove 



1. Remove the cover , discharge the CRT T and remove the 
anode cap . 

2. Move the Macintosh Classic onto your grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never put on a grounding strap until 
after the CRT is discharged.) 

3. Remove the power/sweep board , the memory 
expansion board (if present), the main logic board . 
the SCSI hard disk drive (if present), the 
FDHD/SuperDrive . and the fan . 

4. Remove the four Torx screws and lift out the metal 
chassis. 

5. If you are removing the bezel, first remove the CRT . 



Replace 



1. Place the bezel face down on the grounded work- 
bench pad. 

2. Replace the CRT (if you removed it). 

3. Position the metal chassis over the mounting posts 
on the bezel. 

4. Replace the four Torx mounting screws. (The 
replacement of the screws is much easier if your 
Torx driver is magnetized.) 

5. Replace the fan , the FDHD/SuperDrive . the SCSI 
hard disk drive (if you removed one), the main logic 
board , the memory expansion board (if you removed 
one), the power/sweep board , the anode cap , and the 
cover. 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.29 



□ FUSE 



Remove 



The fuse is located on the power/sweep board and is 
easily reached by removing the Macintosh Classic cover. 

Refer to Figure 2-14 when removing and replacing the 
fuse. 



1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 

2. Move the Macintosh Classic onto your grounded 
workbench pad and put on your grounding 
wriststrap. (Never put on a grounding strap until 
after the CRT is discharged.) 

3. Using a fuse puller or small flat-blade screwdriver, 
carefully pry the fuse out of its holder. 




i 



Figure 2-14 Fuse 



Replace 



1. Snap the replacement fuse into the fuse holder. 

2. Replace the cover . 



2.30 / Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Classic 

Section 3 - Adjustments 



□ CONTENTS 








3.3 


Exterior (Service Panel) Adjustments 




3.3 


Introduction 




3.3 


Materials Required 




3.3 


Adjustment Setup 




3.5 


Brightness and Contrast Adjustments 




3.7 


Centering Adjustments 




3.7 


Size Adjustments 




3.7 


Focus Adjustment 




3.8 


Interior (Yoke) Adjustment 




3.8 


Introduction 




3.9 


Materials Required 




3.9 


Tilt Adjustment 



Macintosh Classic Dec 90 Adjustments / 3.1 



Service 
Panel Door 




Screwdriver 



Figure 3-1 Service Panel Door 






3.2 / Adjustments 



Dec 90 



Macintosh Classic 



□ EXTERIOR (SERVICE PANEL) ADJUSTMENTS 



Introduction 



Video adjustments may be necessary whenever the CRT 
or the power/sweep board is replaced. Video 
adjustments are made from the service panel at the back 
of the computer under the service panel door. 

Note: Because the Macintosh Classic has horizontal and 
vertical centering pots on the back service panel, you 
will never have to perform the internal centering rings 
adjustments that are sometimes necessary on the older 
Macintosh computers. You need not remove the cover 
of the Macintosh Classic for any adjustment procedure 
other than the yoke (tilt) adjustment. 



Materials Required 



Set of plastic hex alignment tools 

Small, insulated, flat-blade screwdriver 

Mirror 

Ruler 

Light meter (Sekonic Multi-Lumi, model L-248) 



Adjustment 
Setup 



1. Remove all metal jewelry. If you are wearing a 
grounding wriststrap, remove it. 

2. Turn the Macintosh Classic with the rear facing you, 
and position the mirror so that you can see the CRT 
screen. 

3. Use a small, flat-blade screwdriver to depress the 
center tab at the bottom of the service panel door; 
then lift out the door (Figure 3-1). 

IMPORTANT: Before performing the following 
adjustments, make sure the computer has been on for at 
least 30 minutes. 



Macintosh Classic 



rev. Jan 91 



Adjustments / 3.3 




Figure 3-2 Brightness and Contrast Adjustments 



3.4 / Adjustments 



Dec 90 



Macintosh Classic 



Brightness 
and Contrast 
Adjustments 



1. Be sure the Macintosh Classic has been on 
for at least 30 minutes. 

2. Select Brightness from the MacTest CL Adjustments 
menu. Click the mouse button once to advance to 
the first brightness level. 

3. Set the light meter scale for the "10 to 18" range 
(Figure 3-2B). 

4. Locate the contrast adjustment pot (PL2) on the 
service panel (Figure 3-2A). Using a small, 
insulated, flat-blade screwdriver or tweaker, adjust 
the contrast (PL2) so that the luminance at the 
center of the screen reads at the high end of the 
black area between "10" and "11" on the light meter 
scale (Figure 3-2B). 

5. Click the mouse button to go to the next brightness 
level. 



6. Set the light meter scale for the "2 to 10" range 
(Figure 3-2C). 

7. Locate the brightness adjustment pot (PL4) on the 
service panel (Figure 3-2 A). Using an appropriately 
sized plastic hex alignment tool, adjust the 
brightness (PL4) so that the luminance at the center 
of the screen reads at the top end of "7" on the light 
meter scale (Figure 3-2C). 

8. Click the mouse button again to go to the next 
brightness level. 

9. Reset the light meter scale for the "10 to 18" range 
and be sure the luminance at the center of the 
screen reads at the high end of the black area 
between "10" and "11" on the light meter scale 
(Figure 3-2B). If it does not, repeat steps 2 through 
7. (You must go back to the Brightness menu and 
click the mouse button to advance through the 
brightness levels again.) 



Macintosh Classic 



Dec 90 



Adjustments / 3.5 



Horizontal Size 
(Width) - (LL2) 




Vertical Size 
(Height) -(PF1) 



Vertical 
Centering - (PF2) 



Focus -(PL1) 



Horizontal 
Centering - (PL3) 



Figure 3-3 Centering, Size, and Focus Adjustments 



3.6 / Adjustments 



Dec 90 



Macintosh Classic 






Refer to Figure 3-3 when making the following 
adjustments. 

Before beginning, select Video from the MacTest CL 
Adjustments menu. Click the mouse button to advance 
to the pattern indicated for each adjustment below. 



Centering 
Adjustments 



1. Select the all-white or Crosshatch display (white 
background). Locate the horizontal centering 
adjustment pot (PL3) on the service panel. Using an 
appropriately sized plastic hex alignment tool, 
adjust PL3 to center the display horizontally within 
the bezel. 



Locate the vertical centering adjustment pot (PF2) 
on the service panel. Using an appropriately sized 
plastic hex alignment tool, adjust PF2 to center the 
picture vertically within the bezel. 



Size 
Adjustments 



1. Select the all-white or Crosshatch display (white 
background). Locate the horizontal size adjustment 
pot (LL2) on the service panel. Using an 
appropriately sized plastic hex alignment tool, 
adjust LL2 until the picture is approximately 
7 inches wide. 



2. Locate the vertical size adjustment pot (PF1) on the 
service panel. Using an appropriately sized plastic 
hex alignment tool, adjust PF1 until the picture is 
approximately 4.7 inches high. 



Focus 
Adjustment 



Select the focus display (the pattern with % signs). 
Locate the focus adjustment pot (PL1) on the service 
panel. Using a small, insulated, flat-blade 
screwdriver or tweaker, adjust PL1 for the best 
overall focus. 



Macintosh Classic 



Dec 90 



Adjustments / 3.7 



Yoke Clamp 
Screw 



Yoke Collar 
Spokes 




Figure 3-4 Yoke Adjustment 



□ INTERIOR (YOKE) ADJUSTMENT 



Introduction 



In infrequent cases, you may need to adjust the yoke of 
the Macintosh Classic after you replace the CRT. If the 
picture is tilted after you have made all possible 
adjustments from the service panel, you must remove the 
Macintosh CL cover and correct the tilt using the yoke 
adjustment. 

Yoke adjustments are made while standing behind the 
Macintosh Classic, so you must position a mirror so that 
you can see the screen. Because of the high- voltage 
danger, do not try to make live adjustments by facing 
the screen and reaching around the computer — you can't 
see what your hands touchl 



3.8 / Adjustments 



Dec 90 



Macintosh Classic 






Materials Required 



Small Phillips screwdriver 

Safety goggles 

CRT discharge tool (part number 076-0381) 

Soft cloth or foam pad 

Mirror 

Small art knife 



WARNING: Read the safety precautions in You Oughta 
Know, Section 8, CRT Safety, before performing 
adjustments. Failure to follow the safety rules could result 
in serious injury. 

Refer to Figure 3-4 when adjusting the yoke. 



Tilt Adjustment 






1. Put on safety goggles and remove all metal jewelry. 
If you are wearing a grounding wriststrap, remove it. 

2. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . (Refer to 
Section 2, Take- Apart.) 

3. Turn the Macintosh Classic so its back faces you, and 
position the mirror so that you can see the CRT 
screen reflected in the mirror. 

4. Loosen the yoke clamp screw at the top of the CRT 
neck two or three turns. 

5. If there is glue holding the yoke in place, cut 
through it using the art knife. 

6. Connect the power cord and turn the power on. 

7. Put one hand behind your back and, with your other 
hand, grasp only the plastic spokes of the yoke 
collar. Rotate the yoke until the top and bottom 
edges of the picture appear parallel with the top 
and bottom edges of the bezel. 

8. Turn the power off, unplug the Macintosh Classic, 
and discharge the CRT again. 

9. Hold the yoke collar in the position you just 
determined in step 7. Carefully tighten the yoke 
clamp screw just enough so that the yoke cannot 
slip. Do not overtighten. 

10. Replace the cover . 

11. Connect the power cord and turn the power on to 
make sure the tilt adjustment is still correct. 



Macintosh Classic 



Dec 90 



Adjustments / 3.9 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Classic 

Section 4 - Diagnostics 



□ CONTENTS 








4.2 


Introduction to MacTest CL 




4.2 


Components Tested by MacTest CL 




4.2 


Making Backup Disks 




4.3 


Copying MacTest CL Disks 




4.4 


Running MacTest CL 




4.4 


Materials Required 




4.4 


Starting MacTest CL 




4.5 


Helpful Hints 




4.6 


Installing the Loopbacks 




4.7 


Using the MacTest CL Menus 




4.10 


Running the Tests 




4.12 


SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure 




4.12 


To Determine If a Jumper Is Needed 




4.13 


To Install the Jumper 



Macintosh Classic Dec 90 Diagnostics / 4. 1 



□ INTRODUCTION TO MACTEST CL 



MacTest™ CL is a standalone functional (pass/fail) test 
of components of the Macintosh Classic system. 
MacTest CL allows you to select the tests you want to 
run. As each test progresses, messages on the screen 
indicate which area is under test. As soon as a failure 
is detected, the test stops and the screen indicates 
which module must be replaced before the test can be 
run to completion. The test then terminates and returns 
to the Finder (desktop). MacTest CL also provides test 
patterns for use in adjusting the video display. 
MacTest CL does not test an internal SCSI hard disk. To 
test the hard disk, use the Macintosh Hard Disk Drive 
Diagnostic disk (see Section 3, Diagnostics, in the SCSL 
Hard Disk Drives Technical Procedures). 



Components 
Tested by 
MacTest CL 



MacTest CL tests the following Macintosh Classic 
components: 

• Main logic board, including: 

- RAM (Random-Access Memory) 

- VIA (Versatile Interface Adaptor) 

- SCC (Serial Communications Chip) 

- ADB (Apple Desktop Bus) communications 

- Clock 

- Sound chip 

• RAM on the memory expansion card 

• Video RAM 

• SCSI bus 

• Internal and external floppy disk drives 



□ MAKING BACKUP DISKS 



Make a backup of the original MacTest CL diagnostic 
disk before you begin! When testing a defective 
system, it is possible to damage or erase a section of 
the MacTest CL disk. You can make backup copies on 
any Macintosh equipped with an 800K or 1.4 MB disk 
drive, regardless of which MacTest program you are 
copying. For example, you can copy the MacTest CL 
disk using a Macintosh II. The copy does not have to be 
made on a Macintosh Classic. 



4.2 / Diagnostics 



Dec 90 



Macintosh Classic 






Copying 
MacTest CL Disks 



Use the Finder to make a backup copy of the 
MacTest CL diagnostic disk. When copying the 
MacTest CL disk, be sure to copy the entire disk and 
not just the MacTest CL program. The MacTest CL disk 
contains specific versions of the System and Finder, and 
is not guaranteed to run with other versions. Also, be 
sure to copy MacTest CL to 800K or 1.4 MB disks. 



Using Your 

Backup 

Disk 



Take the following precautions when using your 
MacTest CL disk copy. 

• Do not write-protect your working copy of the 
MacTest CL disk. The program will not run 
correctly if you do. 

• Do not replace the System or Finder provided on 
the MacTest disk. The versions used on the disk 
are System 6.0.7 and Finder 6.1.7. MacTest CL is not 
guaranteed to work with other versions of the 
System and Finder. 

• Do not change the name of the diagnostic program on 
the disk. During logic board testing, the machine 
reboots, looks for, and restarts the diagnostic named 
MacTest CL. If the name has been changed, the 
startup routine will not be able to locate it, and the 
system will stay on the desktop. 

Therefore, if the MacTest CL window does not 
reappear after a logic board test, check the name of 
the diagnostic icon on the desktop. Correct it to 
MacTest CL and then select Set Startup from the 
desktop Special menu. When you are asked if you 
wish to change the name of the startup application 
to MacTest CL, click OK. Then double-click on the 
corrected MacTest CL icon to return to the test 
program. 



Macintosh Classic 



Dec 90 



Diagnostics / 4.3 



□ RUNNING MACTEST CL 



Materials Required 



MacTest CL diagnostic disk (backup) 
Mini-DIN-8-to-mini-DIN-8 serial port cable 
SCSI loopback test card (modified with jumper- 

"SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure") 
Blank 1.4 MB disk for floppy drive test 



-see 



. 



Starting 
MacTest CL 



You can use MacTest CL to perform a functional test 
of the entire system, or you can use it to test a single 
component in a known-good system. Follow the start-up 
steps below for the testing you wish to perform. 



Testing 

Complete System 
or Logic Board 



If you are testing a complete system, or if you 
intend to run the logic tests, turn the power off and 
install the loopback connectors as described under 
"Installing the Loopbacks," later in this section. 

Insert the MacTest CL disk into the internal drive, 
and switch on the system. MacTest CL will display 
the Start, or Status, window. 

- If you want to run only the short logic board 
tests, click Start. (The short logic board test is 
the default test selection.) 

- If you want to run the long logic board tests (or 
if you want to add other tests), first go to the 
Options menu and use the Test Selections 
submenu to select the tests you want to run. 
Then click Start to run the tests. (For more- 
specific information on the tests, see "Using the 
MacTest CL Menus" and "Running the Tests," 
later in this section.) 



Testing Single 
Component 



1. If you are testing a single component (other than the 
logic board) in an otherwise known-good system, 
insert the MacTest CL disk into the internal drive 
and switch on system power. 

2. From the Status window, go to the Options menu 
and use the Test Selections submenu to select the 
tests you want to run. Then click Start. (For more- 
specific information on the tests, see "Using the 
MacTest CL Menus" and "Running the Tests," later 
in this section.) 






4.4 / Diagnostics 



Dec 90 



Macintosh Classic 



Helpful Hints 



The MacTest CL logic board tests check all the logic 
in the system — on the main board, on the memory 
expansion board, and on the SIMMs; however, the 
diagnostic does not identify which of these modules 
has failed the tests. Follow the steps below to 
determine which logic module has failed: 



a) If the system fails the logic tests, remove the 
memory expansion board and run the logic tests 
again. If the tests fail, replace the main logic 
board. If the tests pass, go to step b. 

b) Install the customer's memory expansion board 
(without SIMMs) and run the logic tests again. 
If the tests fail, replace the memory expansion 
board. If the tests pass, go to step c. 

c) Install a known-good SIMM in one SIMM 
connector and one of the customer's SIMMs in 
the other connector. Run the logic tests again. 
If the tests fail, replace the customer's bad 
SIMM. If the tests pass, the customer's other 
SIMM is bad and must be replaced. 

d) Run the logic tests again as verification of the 
repair. 

If you encounter any of these problems, try the 
solution that follows each problem: 

- A known-good MacTest CL disk will not boot- 
Refer to Section 5, Troubleshooting. 

- The Configuration window indicates that an 
attached disk drive is not installed: Check the 
disk drive cables. 

- The Configuration window indicates that the 
wrong amount of RAM is installed: Check the 
memory expansion board for secure SIMM 
placement in the SIMM connectors and for 
correct positioning of the jumper. (Refer to 
Section 2, Take- Apart.) 



Macintosh Classic 



Dec 90 



Diagnostics / 4.5 



Installing the 
Loopbacks 



Before beginning MacTest CL and with the power off, 

connect the serial loopback cable and the SCSI loopback 
card (as directed below), the keyboard and mouse, and 
the external drive (optional). 

CAUTION: Always switch off the system before you 
connect or disconnect the SCSI loopback card 

Refer to Figure 4-1 when installing the SCSI loopback 
card and the serial loopback cable. 



1. Connect the SCSI loopback card to the SCSI port on 
the back of the system. (No other connections 
between the card and the Macintosh are necessary.) 
To protect the SCSI circuitry, you must have the 
power off when you connect the SCSI card. 

Note: When the SCSI loopback card is connected, 
the internal SCSI hard disk will not be able to 
respond, nor will it be recognized by the system. 

2. Install the mini-DIN-8-to-mini-DIN-8 serial port 
(loopback) cable between the modem and printer 
ports on the rear of the machine. 



SCSI Port 



o 


» m \ o- a ^ <p| "i 


|fOj| (ovwv.v.wg; ^^yttt 


mj« MM v®> 


/ 


"T 


I V- v 



-i r— i r 

1 4A 



T 



mmmm mmm 

r—ir-mm 

Appto Computer 



SCSI 

Loopback 

Test Card 



Serial 

Loopback 

Cable 



Figure 4-1 Installing the Loopbacks 



4.6 / Diagnostics 



Dec 90 



Macintosh Classic 



Using the 
MacTest CL 
Menus 



Before you start MacTest CL, you may use the 
MacTest CL menus to select the tests that you want to 
run or to select other features of the diagnostic. You 
cannot use the menus when the tests are running. 



Options Menu 



The Options menu contains the Test Selections and 
Configuration submenus. 

1. Test Selections. To select a test, click in the box 
next to the name of the item to be tested (an X 
appears). To deselect the test, click again in the 
box (the X disappears). When you have selected all 
the tests you wish, click OK to return to the 
MacTest CL Status window. 

a) Logic Board. This test will verify the correct 
functioning of the following circuitry on the 
logic board: 



VIA (Versatile Interface Adaptor) 

SCC (Serial Communications Chip) 

Clock 

SCSI bus 

RAM 



You may select a short or long logic test. The 
running time of the test will vary depending on 
how much memory is installed. At the beginning 
of the RAM test, MacTest CL will indicate the 
maximum running time of the test. The long 
logic test selection also tests the 64K of video 
RAM. Be aware that video patterns will flash 
across your screen during this test. 

b) Sound. This option provides two tests that 
verify the proper functioning of the sound chip: 

• 8-Level Volume Test: produces 8 tones of 
increasing volume. 

• C Scale: produces a C-major scale. 

c) Disk Drives. You may test any or all of the 

drives (except internal or external hard disks). 

Note: The diagnostic will not test an external 
floppy disk drive that is connected through a 
non-SCSI Hard Disk 20. 



Macintosh Classic 



Dec 90 



Diagnostics / 4.7 



d) Loop on selected tests. This selection provides a 
continuous running (in sequence) of all selected 
tests. To stop the looping, click Stop between 
tests (that is, when the screen displays an arrow 
rather than a wristwatch). 

Here are a few simple guidelines to keep in 
mind when preparing to perform loop tests: 

• You cannot loop on both the Logic Board and 
Disk Drives tests at the same time. 

• When loop-testing a disk drive with more 
than one possible data format (FDHD), you 
can select only one format to loop on. 

Configuration. The MacTest CL Configuration 
window indicates the amount of memory in the 
Macintosh, the version number of its ROMs, the 
type of disk controller chip installed, and its 
current disk drive configuration. 



Adjustments Menu The Adjustments menu allows you to select the test 

patterns that are used to adjust the video display. After 
making any necessary video adjustments, click the 
mouse to continue through the test patterns and return 
to the MacTest CL window. 

Note: You cannot loop on Video Adjustments. 






4.8 / Diagnostics Dec 90 Macintosh Classic 



File Menu 



The File menu displays the following items. (Open and 
Close are dimmed.) 



• Open.- 

• Close 

• Save Test Selections 

• Stop 

• Quit 



[Command-0] 

(Dimmed unless a desk 

accessory is open) 

[Command-S] 

[Command-.] 

[Command-Q] 



1. Save Test Selections: Allows you to customize your 
MacTest CL disk by saving your selection of tests 
for the next time you use MacTest CL. 

2. Stop: Ends the diagnostic and returns to the 
MacTest CL Status window. 

3. Quit: Returns you to the desktop. 



Apple Menu 



The Apple (#) menu contains the following items. 
(Chooser and Find File are shown, but they are inactive.) 

1. About MacTest™ CL. When selected, a dialog box 
displays the diagnostic name, version number, date 
of release, serial number, and a copy-protect 
statement. 

2. Control Panel This option allows you to set 
preferences for speaker volume, monitor status, 
mouse tracking, or desktop pattern. 

3. Key Caps. When selected, Key Caps displays a 
window with a keyboard. Press each key on the 
keyboard and verify that the display block for the 
key is highlighted. If the key is not highlighted, 
the keyswitch is bad and should be replaced. If 
numerous keys are not highlighted, exchange the 
keyboard. 



Macintosh Classic 



Dec 90 



Diagnostics / 4.9 



Running 
the Tests 



After using the Test Selections menu to select the tests 
you wish to run, you are ready to start MacTest CL. 
Click Start in the Status window. Please note the 
following: 

• The Status line at the bottom of the window will 
keep you informed of the tests being performed and 
the test results. 

• While running, all tests display a wristwatch. There 
is no other moving or flashing indicator that tells 
you the test is in progress. 

CA UTION: Do not press the reset or interrupt switch 
while the RAM test is running. Pushing reset causes the 
RAM test to fail, and pressing interrupt may damage the 
MacTest CLdisk. 

• You may halt the testing by clicking Stop or Pause 
anytime between tests (when the cursor is an arrow, 
rather than the wristwatch). 

- Choose Stop to halt the testing and to return to 
the Status window. Choose Start when you wish 
to begin the testing sequence again. 

- Choose Pause if you wish to discontinue testing 
temporarily. Choose Continue to resume the 
tests from the point of interruption. 

Note: Pause, the default option, can also be selected 
during testing by pressing the <Enter> or <Return> 
keys. The program will act upon the Pause command 
when it is between tests. 

• When testing the logic board with a SCSI loopback 
card that is missing or improperly installed, testing 
will begin but the SCSI port test will fail. If you 
wish to test the SCSI port, you must switch off 
system power, disconnect all external SCSI drives, 
and connect the SCSI loopback card before 
continuing the test. MacTest CL permits bypassing 
this test. 






4.10/ Diagnostics 



Dec 90 



Macintosh Classic 



• When testing the logic board, if the serial loopback 
cable is missing or improperly installed, the testing 
will begin but the serial ports test will fail. You 
will be instructed to connect a serial loopback cable 
and then to click OK to retry the failed test. (You 
can connect the serial loopback cable without 
shutting down the system.) MacTest CL permits 
bypassing this test. 

• When the long logic board test is selected, the RAM 
test displays several seconds of graphics before the 
program reboots to the MacTest CL Status window. 

• When testing the FDHD disk drive, you will be 
prompted to insert and remove a high-density 
(1.4 MB) disk. Perform the disk swap as directed 
on the screen. 

Note: It is important to insert the requested high- 
density disk. If the wrong disk is inserted, MacTest 
CL will indicate that the disk drive is 
malfunctioning when it may not be. 

Replace any module that the test indicates is faulty (see 
Section 2, Take-Apart). Before replacing the module, 
refer to Section 5, Troubleshooting, to verify the 
diagnosis. After replacing the module, run MacTest CL 
again as a confidence test. 

If all tests pass, MacTest will return to the Status 
window. The message All selected tests have passed 

will appear on the Status line. 



Macintosh Classic Dec 90 Diagnostics / 4.1 1 



□ SCSI LOOPBACK JUMPER PROCEDURE 



To Determine 
If a Jumper 
Is Needed 



To be used with MacTest CL, the SCSI loopback card 
must be jumpered between Pin 25 of Jl and Pin 14 of 
RP1. On newer SCSI loopback cards, the jumper is 
etched into the printed circuit. Only cards with the 
older PCB artwork need the jumper procedure. 

Note: This modification does not interfere with the 
card's use on other Macintosh or Apple II family 
systems, except that to work on Apple II systems, the 
card must be connected to a notched mouse cable. (For 
further information on the notched cable, refer to Apple 
II Family Cards, Section 1, "SCSI Interface Card and 
High-Speed SCSI Interface Card.") 



To Identify 
a Newer Card 



To determine whether you have a newer card, which 
will not need to be jumpered, look at the back of the 
card. If the jumper is included in the artwork, there 
will be an A instead of double zeros (00) at the end of 
the part number, which is located under the words 
"APPLE COMPUTER" (Figure 4-2, #1). These newer 
cards do not have to be jumpered. 



To SCSI Port 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim nTTTnr 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirTiTTTrmr 



iiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiim 




APPLE COMPUTER 



821-7001-A 
1985 



oopooopopooo cy ■ ..,., J-z zi 

J^ ^ 



doo ooop 1 g=oaao-00 W\-\ 






i LS° 



(Underside) 



Figure 4-2 Identifying a Newer Card 



4.12 /Diagnostics 



Dec 90 



Macintosh Classic 



External 
Jumpers on 
Older Cards 



Some cards with the 00 part number and the older 
artwork were modified with an external jumper 
during the manufacturing process. Therefore, if your 
card has a 00 part number, check to see if it has an 
external jumper from Pin 25 of Jl to Pin 14 of RP1 
(Figure 4-3, #1). If the card has no external jumper, 
you must install one yourself. 



To SCSI Port 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii uirnmr 
nTTTTTnTmTiTiTr. 



mimiiiiiimmimim 



APPLE COMPUTER 
| 821-7001-00 
1985 



•OOQOOOOOPOOO Cf h\v- ffff 



>oo 



)o oop ,.l r ooo o^,:p9 ^ <L. 




(Underside) 



Figure 4-3 Identifying an Older Card 



Summary 



To summarize: 



If # on back 
ends with: 
A 

TO 



Do this: 

Nothing 

(Jumper is present in artwork.) 
Check to see if external jumper 
is present. If not, install jumper. 



To Install 
the Jumper 



If you find that the card must be jumpered, solder a 
wire connection between Pin 25 of Jl and Pin 14 of 
RP1, as shown in Figure 4-3. (The pins are not 
numbered on the board. In the orientation shown in 
Figure 4-3, Pin 25 is the pin closest to the upper-left 
corner of the card, and Pin 14 is in the middle line of 
pins, closest to the left edge of the card.) 



Macintosh Classic 



Dec 90 



Diagnostics/ 4.13 






ft Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Classic 

Section 5 - Troubleshooting 



□ CONTENTS 








5.3 


Introduction 




5.3 


General Information 




5.3 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




5.3 


Things to Remember 




5.5 


Battery Verification 




5.5 


Introduction 




5.5 


Materials Required 




5.5 


Verification Procedure 




5.6 


Symptom Chart 




5.6 


Video Problems 




5.8 


Peripheral Problems 




5.9 


Floppy Drive Problems 




5.10 


SCSI Problems 




5.11 


Miscellaneous Problems 






Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Troubleshooting / 5.1 



□ INTRODUCTION 



General 
Information 



There are two diagnostic tests that you may use to 
troubleshoot a Macintosh Classic system: 



• MacTest™ CL 

• Macintosh Hard Disk Drive Diagnostic 
(version 4.0 or higher) 

Refer to Section 4, Diagnostics, under this tab for 
instructions on using MacTest CL. Refer to 
Section 3, Diagnostics, in the SCSI Hard Disk Drives 
Technical Procedures for instructions on using the 
Macintosh Hard Disk Drive Diagnostic disk. 

Use this troubleshooting section if the diagnostics are 
unable to detect a failure. Read the symptom chart and 
the battery verification procedure before you begin 
troubleshooting; you will need this information to 
troubleshoot the Macintosh Classic effectively. After 
repairing the system, run the diagnostics again to verify 
system operation. 



How to Use 
the Symptom 
Chart 



Find the symptom that most nearly describes the 
problem; then perform the corrective actions in the 
order listed. If a corrective action does not fix the 
problem, go to the next action. If you replace a module 
and find that the problem remains, reinstall the original 
module before you go on to the next action. 



Things to 
Remember 



1. Read all the CRT safety precautions before removing 
or installing any modules and follow all ESD 
precautions when troubleshooting. (See the You 
Oughta Know tab for more information.) 

2. Discharge the CRT before removing or installing any 
modules. (See Section 2, Take-Apart.) 

3. Use known-good software. Bad software can produce 
symptoms that appear to be hardware problems. 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Troubleshooting / 5.3 




Figure 5-1 Battery Verification 



5.4 / Troubleshooting 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



□ BATTERY VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



Use the following procedure to check the operation of 
the lithium battery. If the battery falls below 
specifications, it must be replaced. Refer to Additional 
Procedures for replacement information. 

WARNING: Lithium batteries, the type used in the 
Macintosh Classic, have some potential for explosion if 
improperly handled. Follow the procedure below exactly 
as written. 



Materials Required 



Voltmeter 



Verification 
Procedure 



1. Turn the power off and disconnect the AC power 
cable. 



Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . 
Section 2, Take-Apart.) 



(See 



After the CRT is discharged, move the Macintosh 
Classic onto your grounded workbench pad and put 
on your grounding wriststrap. 



Remove the main logic board . 
Apart.) 



(See Section 2, Take- 



5. Locate the lithium battery. The battery in the 
Macintosh Classic is installed in a plastic battery 
holder. You may have to pull out the battery to 
measure battery voltage (Figure 5-1A). 

6. Set the voltmeter range to measure 10 volts DC. 

7. Touch and hold the positive probe of the voltmeter 
to the positive side of the battery (Figure 5-1B). 

(The positive side of the battery is marked +.) 

8. Touch and hold the ground probe of the voltmeter to 
the negative side of the battery (Figure 5-1B). 

The reading for a good battery should be above 2,8 
volts. If the battery voltage is below 2.8 volts, 
replace the battery. To replace the Macintosh 
Classic battery, refer to Section 6, Additional 
Procedures. 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Troubleshooting / 5.5 



□ SYMPTOM CHART 



Video Problems 



Solutions 



Screen is dark; 
audio and drive 
operate 



1. Readjust brightness (see Section 3, Adjustments). 

2. Readjust cutoff (see Section 3, Adjustments). 

3. Check yoke cable connection. 

4. Replace power/sweep board. 

5. Replace main logic board. 

6. Replace CRT. 



Screen is bright and 
audio is present, 
but no video 
information is visible 



1. Replace power/sweep board. 

2. Replace main logic board. 



Screen is dark; 
fan is not running 



- Replace power/sweep board. 



A single vertical 
line is displayed 



1. Replace power/sweep board. 

2. Replace main logic board. 

3. Replace CRT. 



A single horizontal 
line is displayed 



1. Replace power/sweep board. 

2. Replace main logic board. 

3. Replace CRT. 



• Vertical bars 
or stripes are 
displayed 



1. Replace power/sweep board. 

2. Replace main logic board. 



• Horizontal bars 
or stripes are 
displayed 



1. Replace power/sweep board. 

2. Replace main logic board. 



5.6 / Troubleshooting 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



Video Problems Solutions 
(Continued) 

• A white dot is 1. Verify that the yoke cable is connected. 

displayed in 2. Replace power/sweep board. 

center of screen 3. Replace CRT. 



Screen jitters 1. Move Macintosh Classic away from adjacent 

monitors or other electrical equipment that may 
cause interference. 
2. Replace power/sweep board. 






Macintosh Classic Oct 90 Troubleshooting / 5.7 



Peripheral Problems 



• Cursor does not 
move 



Solutions 



l. 

2. 



3. 



. 



Check mouse connection. 

If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to a 

rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, keyboard 

should be replaced. 

If mouse does not work in any ADB port, replace 

mouse. 

Replace main logic board. 



Cursor moves, but 
clicking the mouse 
button has no effect 



1. Replace mouse. 

2. Replace main logic board. 



Cannot double-click 
to open an application, 
disk, or server 



i. 

2. 



3. 



Remove extra system files on the hard disk. 

Clear parameter RAM. Hold down the 

< Shift >< Option> < Command > keys and select 

Control Panel from the Apple pull-down menu. 

Reset mouse controls. 

If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to 

rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, replace 

keyboard. If mouse does not work in ADB port, 

replace mouse. 

Replace main logic board. 



No response to any 
key on the keyboard 



1. Check keyboard connection to ADB port. 

2. Replace keyboard cable. 

3. Replace keyboard. 

4. Replace main logic board. 



Known-good 
I mage Writer or 
ImageWriter II 
will not print 



1. Make sure that Chooser and Control Panel are set 
correctly. 

2. Replace printer driver and system software with 
known-good. 

3. Replace printer interface cable. 

4. Replace logic board. 



Known-good 
LaserWriter 
will not print 



1. Make sure that Chooser and Control Panel are set 
correctly. 

2. Replace printer driver and system software with 
known-good. 

3. Refer to the Networks tab in the Apple Service 
Technical Procedures. 



5.8 / Troubleshooting 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



Floppy Drive Problems 



Solutions 



• Audio and video are 
present, but 
internal drive 
does not operate 



1. Replace bad floppy disk with known-good. 

2. Replace internal disk drive cable. 

3. Replace internal disk drive. 

4. Replace main logic board. 



• External drive 
does not operate 



1. Replace bad floppy disk with known-good. 

2. Be sure the external drive is placed on the right 
side of the Macintosh Classic. 

3. Replace external drive. 

4. Replace main logic board. 



Disk ejects; display 
shows icon with 
blinking "X" 



1. Replace bad floppy disk with known-good system 
disk. 

2. Replace disk drive. 

3. Replace main logic board. 



• Unable to insert 
disk all the way 



1. Insert opened paper clip into hole beside the drive. 

2. Switch off system and hold mouse button down 
while switching on (to complete eject cycle). 

3. Replace disk drive. 



Will not eject 
disk 



1. Insert opened paper clip into hole beside the drive. 

2. Switch off system and hold mouse button down 
while switching on. 

3. Replace disk drive. 



• Internal disk drive 
runs continuously 



1. Replace bad floppy disk with known-good. 

2. Replace disk drive. 

3. Replace main logic board. 

4. Replace disk drive cable. 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Troubleshooting / 5.9 



SCSI Problems 



• Internal or external 
hard disk will not 
operate 



Solutions 



1. Verify that SCSI loopback card is not attached. 

2. Replace hard disk drive cable. 

3. Replace hard disk. 

4. Replace main logic board. 






Works with internal 
or external SCSI 
device but will not 
work with both 



2. 
3. 

4. 



Verify that SCSI device ID switch setting on 

external device is higher than 0. Also verify that 

ID switch setting on external SCSI device does not 

duplicate ID switch settings on any other attached 

external SCSI devices. 

Replace terminator on external SCSI device. 

Verify that terminator is installed on the internal 

SCSI drive. 

Replace SCSI device select cable. 



5.10 / Troubleshooting 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 






Miscellaneous Problems Solutions 



Clicking, chirping, 
or thumping sound 



1. Verify that main logic board power cable is 
connected at J12 on the main logic board. 

2. Replace power/sweep board. 

3. Replace main logic board. 



• Smoke/odor 



- Replace power/sweep board. 



• No video, no audio, 
and no drive operation 


1. 

2. 
3. 

4. 




5. 


• "Sad Macintosh" 


1. 


icon 


2. 




3. 

4. 


• Screen shows 
"Sad Macintosh" 
icon and black 
vertical lines; 
screeching sound 


1. 

2. 
3. 



Connect power cord. 
Switch power on. 
Replace power cord. 
Replace power/sweep board. 
Replace main logic board. 



Replace bad floppy disk with known-good. 

Verify that jumper on memory expansion board 

is configured correctly for "SIMMs" or "No SIMMs. 

(See Section 2, Take-Apart.) 

Replace optional memory expansion board. 

Replace main logic board. 



Verify that jumper on memory expansion board 

is configured correctly for "SIMMs" or "No SIMMs." 

(See Section 2, Take-Apart.) 

Replace optional memory expansion board. 

Replace main logic board. 



Macintosh Classic 



Oct 90 



Troubleshooting / 5.1 1 



ft Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Classic 

Section 6 - Additional Procedures 



□ CONTENTS 



6.2 SIMM Upgrades 

6.2 RAM Configurations 

6.2 SIMM Identification 

6.2 Installing Upgrades 

6.3 Battery Replacement 

6.3 Introduction 

6.4 Replacement Procedure 



Macintosh Classic Oct 90 Additional Procedures / 6.1 



□ SIMM UPGRADES 



RAM 
Configurations 



The Macintosh Classic can be configured with 1 MB, 
2 MB, 2.5 MB, or 4 MB of random-access memory (RAM). 
The Macintosh Classic logic board has 1 MB of soldered 
RAM. The optional memory expansion board also has 1 
MB of soldered RAM. Additional RAM may be added to 
the system by installing two Single In-line Memory 
Modules (SIMMs) on the memory expansion board. 
Adding two 256K SIMMs brings the system total to 2.5 
MB; adding two 1 MB SIMMs brings the total to 4 MB. 



IMPORTANT: The two SIMM slots must contain two 
SIMMs of like memory capacity (two 256K SIMMS, or two 
1 MB SIMMS), or both slots must be left empty. 



SIMM 
Identification 



SIMMs for the Macintosh Classic are available with two 
sizes of RAM — 256K and 1 MB — and come in several 
vendor versions that can be used interchangeably. For 
identification of the various versions, refer to the 
# Quick Reference: SIMM Compatibility card. 



You must use 120 ns (or faster) SIMMs in the 
Macintosh Classic. SIMMs with a slower rating will 
cause serious timing problems. The RAM speed is 
usually indicated by the -xx number after the 
manufacturer's part number. For example, -15 indicates 
150 ns SIMMs and -12 indicates 120 ns SIMMs. 

CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to damage from 
ESD and skin acid. When examining SIMMs, wear a 
grounding strap and handle the SIMMs only by the edges! 



Installing 
Upgrades 



For detailed take-apart, CRT discharge, and SIMM 
installation instructions, see Section 2, Take-Apart. 






6.2 / Additional Procedures 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



□ BATTERY REPLACEMENT 

Introduction Lithium thionyl chloride batteries, the type used in the 

Macintosh Classic, have some potential for explosion or 
overheating if improperly handled. The following 
precautions should be taken when storing, handling, or 
disposing of lithium batteries: 

• Apple's lithium batteries are sealed in individual 
zip-lock wrappers. Upon receipt, inspect the 
batteries for integrity of their wrappers, and store 
them in the same packaging in which they were 
received or in a similar closed, heavy plastic bag. 

• Store lithium batteries in a designated, well-marked 
area with limited access. 

• Lithium batteries cannot be recharged. Do not 
attempt to recharge the battery. 

• Do not allow the leads or terminals to short-circuit. 






• Replace the battery with the correct Apple replace- 
ment battery only. 

• When installing the battery, ensure correct polarity. 
The polarity markings on the battery must match 
those on the battery holder or circuit board. 

• If the battery holder was provided with a cover, be 
sure to replace it. 

• If the dead battery has leads, remove them before 
disposing of the battery. 

• Do not dispose of the battery in a fire or incinerator. 
Doing so may cause the battery to explode. 

• In addition to its explosive potential, lithium is 
water-reactive and must be disposed of as a 
hazardous waste, as follows: 

Place the dead battery into the zip-lock wrapper and 
packaging from which you took the replacement 
battery. Mark the battery package DEAD and return 
it to Apple for proper disposal Exception ; If the 
battery is physically damaged (for example, leaking), 
do not return it to Apple; dispose of the battery 
locally according to your local ordinances. 



Macintosh Classic Oct 90 Additional Procedures / 6.3 



Replacement 
Procedure 



The Macintosh Classic contains a single long-life 
lithium battery that is installed in a plastic battery 
holder. If the battery fails, replace it using the 
following procedure. Refer to Figure 6-1 when 
replacing the battery. 




Figure 6-1 Battery Replacement 

1. Remove the cover and discharge the CRT . (See 
Section 2, Take-Apart.) 

2. After the CRT is discharged, move the Macintosh 
Classic onto your grounded workbench pad and put 
on your grounding wriststrap. 

3. Remove the main logic board and place it on the 
grounded workbench pad. 

4. Grasp the old battery with your fingers and pull it 
out of the battery holder. 

5. Orient the new battery so that the end marked lf +" 
matches the "+" on the main logic board. Insert the 
battery into the battery holder. 

6. Replace the main logic board and the cover . 

7. Package the old battery as directed in the 
introduction to this procedure and return the 
battery to Apple for proper disposal. 



6.4 / Additional Procedures 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Classic 

Illustrated Parts List 



□ CONTENTS 

IPL.3 Internal View (Figure 1) 



The figures and lists above include all piece parts that 
can be purchased separately from Apple for the Macintosh 
Classic, along with their part numbers. These are the 
only parts available from Apple. Refer to your Apple 
Service Programs manual for prices. 






Macintosh Classic Oct 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.1 




Figure! 



IPL.2/ Illustrated Parts List 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Classic 



□ INTERNAL VIEW (Figure 1) 
Item Part No. Description 



1 


661-0597 




661-0599 


2 


830-0270 


3 


815-1216 


4 


490-0001 


5 


416-1330 


6 


982-0055 


7 


742-0011 


8 


630-0408 


9 


661-0596 


10 


630-5812 


11 


815-1195 


12 


426-1007 


13 


435-5002 


14 


865-0051 


15 


590-0380 


16 


426-1001 


17 


805-0985 


18 


661-0598 


19 


661-0402 




661-0403 




661-0410 




661-0494 


20 


076-0103 


21 


630-5825 


22 


462-4100 


23 


805-5050 


24 


661-0474 


25 


003-0003 


26 


460-3400 


27 


805-0950 


28 


661-0614 


29 


444-6104 


30 


590-0211 


31 


590-0521 


32 


590-0167 


— 


602-0210 


— 


602-0164 



Power/Sweep Board 110 V 

Power/Sweep Board 220 V 

Rivet, Nylon Snap-In, Black 

Insulator, Power/Sweep Board 

Screw (power/sweep to chassis; HDA carrier to FDHD 

carrier) 
Screw, M 3 x 0.5 x 30 mm (fan to plenum) 
Fan 

Lithium Battery (without leads) 
Internal SCSI Terminator 
Main Logic Board 
Rear Housing Assembly with Feet 
Rear Housing Access Door 
Screw, Tap, M 4.22 x 1.41 x 16, Torx, Zinc (main case 

top) 
Screw, Tap, 8.32 x 0.625 Fill, Torx, Zinc Oxide (main 

case bottom) 
Platinum Foot 

Power Cable, AC, 110V, Smoke 
Screw, Tap, M 4.22 x 1.41 x 13, Torx, Zinc (CRT to 

bezel; chassis to bezel) 
Chassis with Plenum 

Memory Expansion Board (without SIMMs) 
SIMM, 256K, 120 ns 
SIMM, 1 MB, 120 ns 
SIMM, DIP, 1 MB, 120 ns 
SIMM, DIP, 256K, 120 ns 
CRT and Yolk Assembly 
Front Bezel 

Screw, FDHD (FDHD carrier to chassis) 
FDHD Carrier 

1.4 MB Mechanism, Disk Drive 
Packing Disk, 2-sided (for transporting) 
Screw, M 3 x 0.5 x 6 (FDHD carrier to FDHD) 
HDA Carrier 

HDA, 1" Internal, 40 MB, 3.5 SCSI 
Screw, 6 - 32 x 0.250 (HDA carrier to HDA) 
Cable, HDA, Internal (SCSI connector cable) 
Cable, HDA, Power 
Cable, 1.4 MB FDHD, Internal 
Service Packaging, 800K/1.4 MB Drive 
Service Packaging, 3.5 HDA 



Macintosh Classic Oct 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.3